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Cargo Part In Commercial Flights  
User currently offlinePaco1980 From Belgium, joined Jan 2009, 21 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3171 times:

Dear All,

I am just wondering what is the Cargo part in non-cargo flights (commercial flights), if existing:
- what is the percentage of containers and pallets that are used for passengers luggage in a commercial flight?

- I know it depends on the Aircraft, but is there like an Airline interest of coupling cargo and passengers? if yes, what is the volume for the aircraft you know or the airline you work for?

- what such cargo would contain generally? post office mails?

- I assume the cargo business is optimized for Cargo airlines so what is the interest if any to couple cargo and Passengers transportation? probably fill in the remaining allowed weight and get some money out of it....

Sorry for the silly question as it depends on the Aircraft, the Airline, and probably the color of the captain's cap  Wink but any information on the subject will help satisfying my curiosity...

Thanks to all.

Paco

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEmptyarm From Norway, joined Jan 2007, 169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3159 times:

Normally, airlines decide an allotment on each route, given the space and weight needed for baggage (on a full flight basis)...After this, if passengers and baggage are not 100%, the rest of the payload can be filled up with cargo booked on the last days.
For instance, in my airline we use at most 10 LD3 for baggage, so we can fit up to 6 LDP (between 10-15 tons) of cargo


User currently onlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9317 posts, RR: 29
Reply 2, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3150 times:



Quoting Paco1980 (Thread starter):
am just wondering what is the Cargo part in non-cargo flights (commercial flights), if existing:
- what is the percentage of containers and pallets that are used for passengers luggage in a commercial flight?

that can vary from flight to flight and depends on the passenger booking situation, weather etc.. Even booked cargo can be bumped from a flight at last minute.

Quoting Paco1980 (Thread starter):
what such cargo would contain generally? post office mails?

cargo and mail are different items. Mail has a higher priority than cargo. Cargo can contain anything that is allowed on an aircraft, even dangerous goods. Except from the class cargo like DGR or human remains or perishables, there is a term FAK which stands for freight all kinds.

Quoting Paco1980 (Thread starter):
- I assume the cargo business is optimized for Cargo airlines so what is the interest if any to couple cargo and Passengers transportation? probably fill in the remaining allowed weight and get some money out of it....

It depends on the airlines business model. We just had a thread about combination carriers which are airlines that have all cargo as well as passenger a/c.

The combination carriers will sell all available space on gtheir flights, regardless if that is cargo or pax a/c They will exchange (transfer) pallets at their hiubs from pax to cao a/c and vv.

Very few flights LH operates do not carry freight, the reason is either too short turn around on domestoic services or the freight office of the handling agent at the destination is not staffed over weelkend, like EDI for instance., Such flights are blocked and cannot be booked for cargo.

Some low cost carriers don't carry cargo at all, likely because it is difficult to rip-off freight forwarders.

The laast sentence of the above question is really what pulls the industry down.

As long as there are carriers that sell fill up space for any price they can get on the market, it will be difficult to make some decent mones in freight. In that case I do prefer an LCC who refrains from carrying freight.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineTW741 From Liechtenstein, joined Sep 2004, 478 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3150 times:

Cargo or better Airfreight is a substantial money maker for airlines especially on widebodies.
At my time with TW we had high freight loads westbound to the US and hardly anything eastbound from the US to Europe.

Quoting Paco1980 (Thread starter):
- what is the percentage of containers and pallets that are used for passengers luggage in a commercial flight?

our average was 1/3rd baggage and 2/3rd freight - one exception we had which was just 1 container with bags plus the belly squeezed with bags and 11 tons of airfreight on the B767-200 to JFK - but that was an exception

Quoting Paco1980 (Thread starter):
- what such cargo would contain generally? post office mails?

when you have a mail contract then you are lucky as mail pays well. normal airfreight is almost anything from perishable goods over spare parts and garments to playstations, car tires and pianos. certain routes see very specific airfreight (thinking of the chestnut season from Milan to North America), other routes have more general commodities. I experienced a typical mix of almost everything sent as airfreight, only thing I didn't like at all where dangerous goods.

Quoting Paco1980 (Thread starter):
- I assume the cargo business is optimized for Cargo airlines so what is the interest if any to couple cargo and Passengers transportation? probably fill in the remaining allowed weight and get some money out of it....

yes and no. the larger the items the better for pure freighters. same for live animals (horses, cows, ...). Actually most airlines try to get as much airfreight as possible supplementing the income of the flight. Sometimes airlines even send larger aircraft to a destination because of high airfreight loads - recently I was reading here on a.net of a LH A300 going to Malta because of airfreight but with a pax load more suitable for an A319....

Only carriers to my knowledge not accepting airfreight are LCC's and possibly regionals with small aircraft. But the usual 737s and A320s do also carry a good amount of airfreight on every flight.

just my  twocents 



TWA - we showed you how good we have been!
User currently onlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9317 posts, RR: 29
Reply 4, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 3129 times:



Quoting TW741 (Reply 3):
Cargo or better Airfreight is a substantial money maker for airlines especially on widebodies.
At my time with TW we had high freight loads westbound to the US and hardly anything eastbound from the US to Europe.

you see what a difference an excellent sales force plus a good office crew makes. The TWA people at FRA were tops, at JFK the Eurpoean carriers moved the bulk of the US/Europe freight.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineDalmd88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2543 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 3107 times:

I noticed on a narrow body like an MD80 the aft cargo is full of bags and the mid is usually cargo. Sometimes there is also cargo in the fwd. Live animals like dogs have to go in the fwd most bin for these planes.

User currently offlineTW741 From Liechtenstein, joined Sep 2004, 478 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 3105 times:



Quoting PanHAM (Reply 4):
The TWA people at FRA were tops

yes our FRA ground staff, be it Ops, Cargo or Pax where real pro's (like we have been at VIE) ..... inbound from JFK, if there was freight on board, same arrived usually unmanifested, no docs - it was always a mess....
but it was the same when I was with AC - westbound top loads, eastbound poor loads with poor service from our overseas colleagues .....

My impression always was that the eastbound loads all arrived on LH and KL....

After my TW time the carrier I worked for had just regional aircraft just fitting a few envelopes as airfreight  Big grin



TWA - we showed you how good we have been!
User currently offlinePaco1980 From Belgium, joined Jan 2009, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3063 times:

Thanks to all for the replies.

I have a further question:

- What generally limits the additional cargo for passengers flights?
Is it the available volume? or is it the available remaining weight which should be if I am not wrong limited by the Aircraft Maximum Zero Fuel Weight?

Because, theoretically, it all depends on the density of what you carry... so how is it in the real life?


User currently onlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9317 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3036 times:



Quoting Paco1980 (Reply 7):
Is it the available volume? or is it the available remaining weight which

Both. In load planning you have to conisder the available space and weight capacity and get that in line with the weight and volume of the airfreight.

Quoting Paco1980 (Reply 7):
it all depends on the density of what you carry

Good man, wanna start a career in airfreight? Indeed the density is important. Presently, 1 kg equals 1 cdm which means that one cubic metre is charged at 167 kgs or, if greater, the actual weight.

The rule is multiply lenght widht and height and divide by 6 and you get the volumetric weight. The chargeable weight is whatever is greater, actual or volumetric.

.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineTW741 From Liechtenstein, joined Sep 2004, 478 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3019 times:



Quoting Paco1980 (Reply 7):
- What generally limits the additional cargo for passengers flights?
Is it the available volume? or is it the available remaining weight which should be if I am not wrong limited by the Aircraft Maximum Zero Fuel Weight?

a lot of factors but most important
- weight restrictions for the flight - a refuel stop just because of a full cargo load wouldn't pay

other reasons could be
- volume
- floor loading limits - what can be ok for a maindeck freighter is sometimes not loadable in the lower holds of a passenger plane - not because of size but of the high weight per square-meter and per loading position
- special cargo/dangerous goods - not all kind of dangerous goods are allowed on pax aircraft but may be carried on dedicated freighters (what i remember some kind of radioactive material for instance)
- size limitations - on freighters I can load long pieces over more than one pallet position which i cannot do in the lower hold
.....
but the most annoying reason for limiting airfreight on passenger flights is a lack of containers/pallets - no ULD's - no freight  banghead  (especially when the colleagues on the other end forget to send empty ULD's with the inbound flight

for narrow body aircraft it can also be a weight and balance issue.

But for me the most important limitation for airfreight on passenger aircraft is the matter of weight restrictions (additional fuel stops).

Quoting Dalmd88 (Reply 5):
on a narrow body like an MD80 the aft cargo is full of bags and the mid is usually cargo

worst aircraft for me for cargo loading where the DC9s/MD80s with the inward swinging door restricting additionally the available height and additionally having to keep the door area free of any loads - 737s and 727s are/where workhorses for airfreight loads. Brrrr - thinking of the problems with the surfboards on the mad dogs  cry 



TWA - we showed you how good we have been!
User currently offlineMayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10393 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2971 times:

Another restriction we had at SLC, particularly for the ATL widebodies, was the "necessity" to have containers for connecting bags. The way it was set up didn't make much sense because you might have a container going out with only 5 bags in it, just because they were connecting to a certain "zone" in ATL. Such a waste, when those bags could have gone in the bulk bin and another container of cargo could have been loaded. I think that has changed, now, but I can't be certain. SLC cargo had an excellent relationship with SLC ramp and, therefore, we were able to move alot of cargo.


On another note, when I worked cargo at ORD, our 747 to MIA would have all the pax bags in the bulk bin and all the containers would be mail and freight.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlinePaco1980 From Belgium, joined Jan 2009, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (5 years 7 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2939 times:

Thanks all for all this info.
Cheers,

Paco


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