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TSA's New Secret Weapon!  
User currently offlineFxramper From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 7277 posts, RR: 85
Posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 12068 times:
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Politeness?  fluffy 

I am sorry, but for someone like myself that is in an airport 8 days a week, the weapon for the TSA is still secret to me (no offense to TSA employees that read this site).

The reactions from the TSA when I walk up with no luggage, no nothing, just a smile, and some airport badges they aren't familar with. "Can we let this guy through just to get some food?!"

Can anyone tell a difference with TSA these days? Comments and experiences welcome.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29142020/

28 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAdam42185 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 414 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 11827 times:

I just read the article myself, you beat me to posting it! I haven't been through TSA since January and I wasn't really paying attention then. Normally for me nothing noteworthy happens at screening checkpoints and agents are for the most part courteous and polite. I have, however, experienced first and second hand some pretty nasty treatment at security checkpoints, if this eliminates all rudeness at checkpoints I applaud the TSA and will be very impressed. I think its unlikely though that every agent will be as polite as the article claims they will be because its just too hard to control everybody's emotions and behavior.

I wonder if there will be any oversight to this, if there will be disciplinary action for rudeness?


User currently offlineSkyGirl From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 451 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 11452 times:

In a lot of the larger airports I've noticed that the feelings I get from TSA aren't so much anger or annoyance - it's more along the lines of apathy. I've literally seen them roll their eyes as they holler for everyone to hold on to their boarding pass or to remove laptops from their bags. And yes, I've stifled many a giggle when I see those eyes roll. I can understand a bit of the frustration when you shout the same thing over and over and no one listens.

Smaller airports...Now there's a different story. TSA generally has no sense of humor. At all. I remember going through TSA at SCE and they gave me a thorough talking to because I didn't declare my half a bottle of hotel lotion that was in my purse. It was the only liquid I had. If the talking to wasn't bad enough, they then took the lotion and put it in a ziploc bag and re ran both it and my purse through the x ray machine. And then they let me know that as a crew member I should have known better.

I understand they have a job to do whether I agree with all the nonsense they do or not. But between the apathetic and the I take myself too seriously attitudes I have yet to find those that are truly polite. Please? Thank you? Have a nice day? I only hear that if I say it first.



...Now they face an even greater danger...Tyrannousaurs in F-14's!!
User currently offlineSiromega From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 735 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 11239 times:

That is about the only part I feel bad for the TSA. No one listens anymore. Even I wasn't paying that much attention (it was the 6th time I had traveled in 2008, which is a lot for me, I usually only fly once or twice a year), and I almost forgot to put my cellphone in my carry-on from my pocket.

User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 10979 times:

Does anyone know the TSA's turnover rate? This sounds like a great plan, but it will be a huge and costly undertaking if there's still a revolving door in the personnel department...


Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineAer From Guatemala, joined Mar 2004, 1048 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 8541 times:



Quoting Fxramper (Thread starter):
I am sorry, but for someone like myself that is in an airport 8 days a week

A Beatles fan I take?



nice and spacious airports in need of new airlines and flights... GUA or FRS anyone?... anyone at all?
User currently offlineIflyswa From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 154 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 8093 times:



Quoting Fxramper (Thread starter):
and some airport badges they aren't familar with.

In December, I was told by not one, not two, but THREE TSA employees at DTW's North Terminal that they weren't familiar with my employee badge. Clearly, Southwest isn't the only airline operating from that terminal and definetely not the most prominent, but the badge I was presenting was a Southwest Employee badge that differs from a Southwest crew badge only by the lack of the word "CREW" in bold letters at the bottom; otherwise, the badges are identical. The ID checker had to get a second opinion from the other agent that monitors the line, and together they needed clarification from a supervisor who wanted to take my badge over to our ATO to verify with a Southwest Employee that this was a valid ID (as if I would be attempting to clear a TSA checkpoint posing as an Employee?). Even though I had a security document, he also questioned my NRSA passes which he said weren't valid because I had "filled them in" and they weren't specifically valid only for the date of my intended travel. Other Southwest Employees will know that the information on the PB-002, such as the passenger's name, listing number, routing, etc, are filled in by hand, and these are the same documents that all Employees and Employee dependents use for NRSA travel. But TSA claimed never to have seen one before.

I've traveled to/from DTW a few times since then already and haven't encountered anything like this again (nor have I encountered this at any point before--at any airport). In fact, my recent trips though the checkpoint there were pleasant as could be. But I was shocked TSA would admit being unfamiliar with my badge...how would they know whether actual CREW badges are the real thing, either? Obviously our crews enter through the same checkpoints and present the same ID. I didn't even run into this problem when I interened with the Company, and the Intern badge is vastly different from our Employee badges. One TSA agent that initially questioned my Intern credentials eventually determined that as long as it said Southwest, it must be okay (which, in retrospect, is somewhat concerning, also).

Bartenders and convenience store clerks will even have some idea of what an ID looks like from neighboring states to avoid serving or selling alcohol to an underage drinker with a fake ID, and most can spot some pretty good fakes. Better yet, some will have a book that shows a sample and outlines what to look for to differetiate a valid original from a fake. I was even trained to spot a fake Michigan driver license when I worked in Residence Life and attended school in the state. Am I to believe that TSA does not receive training as to what valid airline employee credentials look like or have some resources or guidance on the subject? That's incredible to me.

iflyswa



Opinions expressed by "iflyswa" are not those of Southwest Airlines Officers, Directors, or Employees.
User currently offlineN747PE From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 103 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 8045 times:

I agree with Skygirl. The TSA agents at the larger airports are very professional, the smaller airports are a different story. My daughter was an 11 year old UNAM and she flew out of SCK last year. First TSA was not going to admit her to the boarding area because she didn't have a government issued ID, thank god I had her passport in the car for just such an idiot! My daughters two oz bottle of contact lense fluid was confiscated. The two TSA agents at SCK had to be prison guard rejects. My daughter was so put off by the experience that she will not fly alone anymore. I want to thank the TSA staff at PHX and BUR for giving great professional service. Maybe the problem with smaller airports is the reduced tours of duty? The good TSA agents work at big airports where they can make more money. I would just like to remind the TSA agents at smaller airports that if the screening experience does not improve people will just give up flying and TSA will be out of a job!

User currently offlineSkyguyB727 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 7775 times:



Quoting Iflyswa (Reply 6):
Am I to believe that TSA does not receive training as to what valid airline employee credentials look like or have some resources or guidance on the subject?

I've flown out of some airports where the TSA refused to accept my air carrier ID badge and SIDA badge (government issued) as valid ID. At another airport, an obviously new TSA agent refused to accept any ID that didn't have my birthdate on it. I have no idea what my birthdate had to do with my ability to clear security and board a flight.


User currently offlineIflyswa From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 154 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 7659 times:



Quoting SkyguyB727 (Reply 8):

IDs meeting REAL ID standards are required to display the subject's birthdate. However, TSA guidelines establish that IDs issued by a state or federal government agency meeting REAL ID standards will be accepted, among a few other forms (tribal ID cards, etc). In addition, an air carrier ID is also listed as an accaptable ID.

iflyswa



Opinions expressed by "iflyswa" are not those of Southwest Airlines Officers, Directors, or Employees.
User currently offlineEBGflyer From Denmark, joined Sep 2006, 1002 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 7601 times:

I come through the US a lot and I tell you it's a pain going through TSA when you have a prosthetic leg. I sometimes get treated like a suspect just because I trigger the metal detector with a major blip. Courtesy is one thing, but it would be nice with a little bit of common sense.


Future flights: CPH-BKK-MNL; MNL-GUM-TKK-PNI-KSA-KWA-MAJ-HNL-LAX
User currently offlineZvezda From Lithuania, joined Aug 2004, 10511 posts, RR: 64
Reply 11, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 7475 times:

I was in the queue a few years ago behind a US Navy officer in uniform. The TSA agent refused to accept his US military ID on the ground that he could only accept government-issued ID.  Yeah sure About 30 seconds of discussion with a supervisor ensued, after which he was let through. The same TSA agent looked at my lithuanian ID card (no English, French, or any other commonly understood language) and asked "Is this government ID?" I said "Yes." He gestured for me to pass. The private contractors before 9/11 were, on average, so much more intelligent, courteous, and professional. The only way to fix TSA is privatization.

User currently offlineFleet Service From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 622 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 6595 times:

The TSA can go defecate in a hat, touchy feely video training or not.In my eyes the TSA is the Bureau of Bureaucracy.

They strut around here (LGA) like they own the place,they squat in the food court in concourse D like it's their break room,passengers can barely find a table to sit at with their meal because the TSA are everywhere.They storm troop through employee areas like they're the cops with a search warrant and they act like they are in fact sworn officers with powers of arrest.

I was outside the terminal smoking a cigarette on my lunch break and I had three of these dopes walk up on me and ask to see my ID.The woman tells me "Don't worry, I'm not going to arrest you for smoking" I laugh and tell her she couldn't give me a ticket for jaywalking as she has no authority to do that.

That didn't go over too well,but I've got no use or sympathy for the TSA.



Yes, I actually *do* work for an airline,how about you?
User currently offlineSkymiler From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 529 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 5025 times:

I am another "8 days a week" flyer, and find the TSA very inconsistent from airport to airport, although I have found BUF to be a notable bright spot with the way it is organised (even with construction) and a willingness to help!
The queues can look fearsome but they REALLY move everybody through!



I love to fly, and it shows!
User currently offlineAlaskaqantas From New Zealand, joined Dec 2005, 905 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 4818 times:

you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink.

granted, I do hope that this training does help, but I feel that the TSA agents that were already friendly will just become even more friendly and the ones that hated their job will just roll their eyes like a kid whose mum has told him to clean his room 10 times.

One time when I was in MSP going through security I ran into a 'tsablem.' The TSA agent didn't want to except my New Zealand passport because of these three reasons:
* She didn't know what a real New Zealand passport looked like,
* She thought I looked too young in my picture (it was only issued 3 years ago),
* And... my lack of a New Zealand accent. (due to my training Im being taught proper american speech, so I try to use that in public in America)

Since I had lost my license in Malawi a few weeks earlier and didn't have any other form of ID on me, I had to go get my bags from check-in (where luckily they hadn't been put through to the plane yet) and get my American Passport out(dual-citizenship).

I think that this was ridiculous. I mean I have always traveled on my New Zealand passport, except when arriving into the US from an international flight, it has just become habit.

Now I always make sure to just use my New Zealand accent when going through security and that seems to be enough for them...
~Cheers-
~~Kyle H



to some people the sky is the limit, to aviation enthusiasts, its home!
User currently offlineAccess-Air From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1939 posts, RR: 13
Reply 15, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 4782 times:



Quoting Skymiler (Reply 13):
I am another "8 days a week" flyer, and find the TSA very inconsistent from airport to airport,

That is exactly how they want it.....If its all the same at every airport, then that could be a way for TSA to be breached...

Of course, I have flown as recently as last year in April and May and I have not had too many bad things to say about them. However, I have observed, randomly at big or smaller airports that some are nice and others need to go find another job. Some are arrogant and some are clueless.....To tell you the truth, I dont feel any safer now than I did before 9/11....
Because I know that the people hi-jacked those planes with items that the FAA said was okay to take on the plane, doing what we are doing now, is like closing the barn door after the horse has run away....
I used to be a GSC (Ground Security Co-Ordinator) with Great Lakes Airlines at KSQI, just to qualify my comments here....

Access-Air



Remember, Wherever you go, there you are!!!!
User currently offlineXtoler From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 953 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 4538 times:



Quoting SkyguyB727 (Reply 8):
I have no idea what my birthdate had to do with my ability to clear security and board a flight.

Maybe he used to work at a liquor or convenience store and you didn't look 21!

I haven't had too much problem with TSA at any of the airports I've been in and out of. But there are some agents that are missing a five beers out of a six pack and I've wondered how the hell they got hired. Oh yeah, government.



EMB145 F/A, F/E, J41 F/A, F/E, because my wife clipped my wings, armchair captain
User currently offlineDALMD88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2546 posts, RR: 14
Reply 17, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4099 times:

The little airport factor isn't anything new. I worked at SPI way before the TSA existed. Sure it is a state capitol, but it is a sleepy airport that at the time had service to Chicago and St Louis. The cops at that airport were a little intense. They would give us the once over every time we flew out. Our jole was they suspected us of trying to sneak Lincoln's body out of the city in our carry ons.

User currently offlineBurnsie28 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 7539 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 3770 times:



Quoting Fxramper (Thread starter):
The reactions from the TSA when I walk up with no luggage, no nothing, just a smile, and some airport badges they aren't familar with. "Can we let this guy through just to get some food?!"

haha that reminded me that when my roommate and I were in MSP and we were heading back to GFK, he at the time was employed by Skywest, he tries to go through security and the guy said that he never heard of this airline and that they don't fly to MSP so he can't go through.

Well
1. Even if they don't fly to MSP it doesn't matter, an airline employee badge is good enough for any US Airport.

2. They do fly there as Midwest Connect (Granted in Humphrey), and Delta Connection



"Some People Just Know How To Fly"- Best slogan ever, RIP NW 1926-2009
User currently offlineDxBrian From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 135 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3679 times:



Quoting Burnsie28 (Reply 18):
1. Even if they don't fly to MSP it doesn't matter, an airline employee badge is good enough for any US Airport.

That's actually not true. If your airline has no operations at a particular airport, your badge is not acceptable through the employee line.


User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3626 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3551 times:



Quoting DxBrian (Reply 19):
That's actually not true. If your airline has no operations at a particular airport, your badge is not acceptable through the employee line.

Technically true, but youll find that rarely enforced (leading back to the notion of inconsistency)

Plenty of examples to back that up...



I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
User currently offlineZvezda From Lithuania, joined Aug 2004, 10511 posts, RR: 64
Reply 21, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 3512 times:



Quoting DxBrian (Reply 19):
If your airline has no operations at a particular airport, your badge is not acceptable through the employee line.

Airline ID still valid ID for the SLF line at any US airport.


User currently offlineCrewchief From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3400 times:

I haven't noticed any correlation in the size of the airport and TSA employee's demeanor. Most all are polite, or at least speak politely.

Sometimes the politeness can be surreal. Like when the screener apparently mistook the GPS dash mount in my travel bag for a hand grenade. Without telling me what the problem was, they stopped the conveyor belt, stopped everyone from transiting the screening area, removed my bag from the conveyor belt, and as it was walked past me one of the screeners shook it in from of my face and loudly demanded "What's in here?"

After the bag was taken to an area to be searched, a different screener politely asked if they could open the bag to look inside. Without knowing what the problem was, I consented. While several TSA employees witnessed the search, and called the police, everyone called me "sir", yet wouldn't respond to my question about what they were searching for or allow me to move away from the screening area. Finally the police officer asked me if the bag contained a grenade -- that's the first time I was aware of their problem.

Once TSA confirmed the false alarm, a different TSA employee walked up to me to say that the event would not be reported anywhere, but a record of the false alarm kept at the airport.

Polite, yet surreal. And the first time in countless trips with the GPS dash mount that anything like that occured.


User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1871 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3362 times:
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Quoting Iflyswa (Reply 9):
an air carrier ID

Little does he know that an US air carrier ID is one step below a federal LEO credential...It is to be accepted at all airports and in some cases in place of a SIDA badge...also allows you to be exempt from selectee processing.



The only valid opinions are those based in facts
User currently offlineJohns624 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 923 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3325 times:

What's really scary is that CBP (Customs and Border Protection) is getting a large percentage of their new hires from TSA. I'm not sure if there is a mandate or not...

25 FlyDeltaJets87 : My dad used to have the worst experiences with them traveling out of MCN (Macon, GA). Often times he had to travel in uniform (Air Force) because of
26 Henry757 : Personally I think there could be something way BETTER THAN TSA. I work at MIA airport, for the airline however I do have the county badge too. TSA em
27 Jeremy : They do the same in IND. I try to appreciate them but the ineptness really bugs me. That's government hiring for you.
28 Davehammer : I've never really had a very bad experience with the TSA anywhere though some of them do seem like they have no personal skills whatsoever. There does
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