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Two NWA Baggage Handlers Arrested  
User currently offlineRampRat74 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1521 posts, RR: 2
Posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 10712 times:

Two PDX baggage handlers arrested for hundreds of thefts.


http://www.krem.com/news/northwest/s...rem2-022109-pdxtheft.39fad576.html


I was shocked when I heard this. I see these two employees around PDX all the time. You have a good paying job, and you do stuff like this. I noticed the Port installed a ton of cameras throughout PDX over the last year. We have had problems with bag thefts from the claim area ever since the light rail came to the airport.

31 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 8843 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 10602 times:

Who can figure it out, why they would put their jobs and freedom in jeopardy. Is it greed or drugs, stupidity? If they hated their jobs, they will hate jail even more. That is where they deserve to be.


It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlineCaryjack From United States of America, joined May 2007, 305 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 10558 times:

Sorry you ended up working around some thieves but you did get rid of them, and that's good news.

Quoting RampRat74 (Thread starter):
We have had problems with bag thefts from the claim area ever since the light rail came to the airport.

This interests me because here in King County our light rail will soon start service between down Seattle and the airport (SEA). I suppose we should expect the same type of undesirable activity and begin to act accordingly. Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Cary


User currently offlinePlatinumfoota From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 556 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 10175 times:
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If they are found guilty, then good. They bring a bad name to not only their airline but rampers too.


Never forget United 93
User currently offlineAcNDTTech From United States of America, joined exactly 6 years ago today! , 338 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 10128 times:

Back around 1990 - 1991, I had things missing from my luggage while flying on UAL from IND-ORD-TUL. The day after I got home, I went back to UAL's baggage claim rep., but their response was......can I prove that I packed the items that I claimed was missing. Long story short - not long later, a story on the evening news was a huge theft ring was broken at ORD including UAL and AA employees. You know, I can stand a lot of different kind of people......I can't stand a thief though.

User currently offlineNWAESC From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 3381 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 10059 times:

Charges against one have been dropped....

http://www.katu.com/news/39990787.html



"Nothing ever happens here, " I said. "I just wait."
User currently offlineGojetset From United States of America, joined May 2007, 43 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 10049 times:

Does having TSA locks on luggage prevent this?

Pre 9/11 (when you could lock your own bag without the TSA ones) my family and I always used to lock our luggage.

Now after 9/11, we always use TSA locks, but its kind of weird, cause they have the key.

Would employees like these have access to TSA keys?


User currently offlineHatbutton From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1500 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 10008 times:



Quoting RampRat74 (Thread starter):
We have had problems with bag thefts from the claim area ever since the light rail came to the airport.



Quoting Caryjack (Reply 2):
This interests me because here in King County our light rail will soon start service between down Seattle and the airport (SEA). I suppose we should expect the same type of undesirable activity and begin to act accordingly. Any suggestions?

I don't necessarily see how you can conclude a light rail is causing theft problems. There is plenty of bus access to airports that I can't see a light rail being the cause for increased luggage theft. Especially cause this particular story involves rampers. Sure a light rail gives you more access to the airport, but those that really wanted to steal won't just now decide to come do it being that there is a light rail now.

I've never been a fan of airlines leaving baggage out in the claim area though and am surprised nobody has really made a protest to change this.

Quoting Gojetset (Reply 6):
Now after 9/11, we always use TSA locks, but its kind of weird, cause they have the key.

Would employees like these have access to TSA keys?

They shouldn't. But I've heard of TSA issues with theft in luggage as well. So no one is safe. I mean if it comes down to it and a ramper really wants in a bag, they will find a way to break your lock. It's unfortunate but as long as there are desperate people in the world for one reason or another they will find a way. Which leads me to wholeheartedly agree with this statement...

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 1):
If they hated their jobs, they will hate jail even more. That is where they deserve to be.



User currently offlineContrails15 From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 9149 times:



Quoting Hatbutton (Reply 7):
Now after 9/11, we always use TSA locks, but its kind of weird, cause they have the key.

Would employees like these have access to TSA keys?

Locks are broken by TSA if they need to get in the bag. Ramp Agents do not have access to the keys and are in no way allowed to open any bags. I've been a ramp agent for almost 7 years now and fly quit often. I've maybe checked my bag a hand full of times and when I do, there is NOTHING valuable that I put there. Your luggage is in the hands of strangers and there is nothing you can do about it except don't put anything in there that you would to lose. Now I'm not saying that theft happens all the time but it happens. Just becasue we go thru background checks doesn't mean the person loading your bag is a saint. Measures are taken such as under cover employees, cameras in the bag rooms and even in the bellies of some aircraft. It hurts me to hear theses stories as ramp agents all ready get treated like the bottom of the food chain but I can say for the most part there are good agents out there but your always going to have a few bad apples. My best advice, put the valuable stuff in you carry on as best you can.



Giants football!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
User currently offlineCrimsonNL From Netherlands, joined Dec 2007, 1844 posts, RR: 42
Reply 9, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 8687 times:
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CHAT OPERATOR

What surprised me at some US airports, the baggage claim belts were just 10 meters away from the street (domestic luggage) So you can just walk in, grab a suitcase and run! There was just 1 revolving door between the belt and the street!

At AMS there is a one way door so you cant walk in from the "outside" to the claim area, seems to me thats a lot "safer" then just acces from anybody into the claim area.



Fly DC-Jets!
User currently offlineMayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10345 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 8551 times:

When I hired on with DL at ORD in '71, 7 DL ramp agents had just been fired for pilferage from luggage. Several years later, a few ramp agents were fired after it was discovered that they were stealing cases of soft drinks to have at their softball games. It happens, but, I could never understand why someone would want to jeapordize what was a pretty good job, with good benefits and pay (at least at that time).

I never understood, why, at ORD, they removed the people that checked your bag tags against your bag receipts when you left baggage claim. I realize it's a money saving issue, but this alone should help deter thefts. Now, you can just walk in, grab a couple of bags and walk back out.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineRamprat74 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1521 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 8360 times:



Quoting Hatbutton (Reply 7):
don't necessarily see how you can conclude a light rail is causing theft problems. There is plenty of bus access to airports that I can't see a light rail being the cause for increased luggage theft. Especially cause this particular story involves rampers. Sure a light rail gives you more access to the airport, but those that really wanted to steal won't just now decide to come do it being that there is a light rail now.

We don't have Tri-Met bus service to the airport. It stopped when the light rail came. It's a whole easier for a crook to come in on the train, steal a bag from the claim belt, then hop right back on the train. I talk to plenty of the Port Police officers. They are the ones telling me, they are catching the crooks on the train. We also have a big problem with the homeless taking the train to the airport at night, and trying to sleep somewhere in the terminal. The POP Police finds them and kicks them out.

Back to the subject. Even though the woman wasn't charged. I believe NWA will still fire her.


User currently offlineUpcfordcruiser From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 106 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 7512 times:

I don't know how background checks work there but in Tx, rarely does an employer ever background check for misdemeanors, which is exactly what most thefts are. Unless you get caught numerous times or someone gets hurt (aggrivated robbery), it is almost never a felony.

User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets87 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 7121 times:



Quoting AcNDTTech (Reply 4):
Back around 1990 - 1991, I had things missing from my luggage while flying on UAL from IND-ORD-TUL. The day after I got home, I went back to UAL's baggage claim rep., but their response was......can I prove that I packed the items that I claimed was missing. Long story short - not long later, a story on the evening news was a huge theft ring was broken at ORD including UAL and AA employees. You know, I can stand a lot of different kind of people......I can't stand a thief though.

One of my friends here at Riddle was flying home from Portland, Maine to Daytona Beach about a year ago and (stupidly) packed his new Wii in his checked bag. All of his Air Force uniforms were in there too. His bag disappeared somewhere between Portland and Daytona. He put down a claim for the maximum amount allowed by the airline and got $5,000.

Fortunately I've never had anything stolen out of my luggage but then again, the only thing I usually check are my golf clubs. Rarely do I check I suitcase even with clothes.

Quoting Mayor (Reply 10):
I never understood, why, at ORD, they removed the people that checked your bag tags against your bag receipts when you left baggage claim. I realize it's a money saving issue, but this alone should help deter thefts. Now, you can just walk in, grab a couple of bags and walk back out.

The worst I've seen was in Cincinnati back in December 2004. Due to heavy snowstorms and hundreds of cancelled flights, there were literally hundreds of suitcases just placed along the wall in baggage claim, and anyone could just walk up and grab any bag if they wanted to.


User currently offlineLuv2cattlecall From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1650 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 6582 times:
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Quoting FlyDeltaJets87 (Reply 13):
The worst I've seen was in Cincinnati back in December 2004. Due to heavy snowstorms and hundreds of cancelled flights, there were literally hundreds of suitcases just placed along the wall in baggage claim, and anyone could just walk up and grab any bag if they wanted to.

Since it seems that quite a few airlines don't actually scan bag tags...what would happened if you landed and your bag isn't at the bag-claim? What I mean is..how would the airline be able to differentiate between a bag that got lost in transit vs. one that was stolen at the bag claim?

Also, who's liable for a bag stolen from bag claim?

I lost quite a bit of my trust of the general public after I caught someone trying to walk away with my bag (the bright yellow Flyertalk bag tag is unmissable!)...in CID of all places.



When you have to breaststroke to your connecting flight...it's a crash!
User currently offlineRailker From Canada, joined Aug 2006, 171 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 6475 times:



Quoting Gojetset (Reply 6):
Does having TSA locks on luggage prevent this?

As mentioned already, if someone really wants into a bag, they'll get in. But I suppose an open bag would be more appetizing than a locked one.

But as far as those locks you put on staying on your bag? Let's just say there's buckets of debris under the belt system -- anything that dangles off your bag (such as locks and straps) is likely to get ripped off your bag, caught between sections of belt.

I have seen some bags, however, that have a lock as part of the bag -- so instead of looping an add-on lock through your zippers, your zipper handles get locked directly onto a locking receptacle on your bag. A better choice if you're carrying valuables in your bag, I would imagine.

Quoting Contrails15 (Reply 8):
Ramp Agents do not have access to the keys and are in no way allowed to open any bags.

No access to keys for sure, but up here, the manual from the airline states that a bag can be searched (i.e. vibrating bags, only with cause). But there needs to be two witnesses, preferred to be from the airline, and a document signed by both witnesses and the ramper searching to state that the bag was searched and for what reason, and that document is left in the bag.


User currently offline3holeflyer From United States of America, joined May 2008, 30 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 6415 times:

I always thought that it was inconvenient, pointless & ineffective to restrict non-ticketed pax from the gate areas. I would rather see non-ticketed pax prevented from entering the bag claim area. Besides baggage security, in a lot of locations friends & family crowd the claim area.

In fact if I was running things, I would build a fence between each baggage carousel (with old unclaimed bags & smart-carts if necessary), and entry would be by a scanner matching the ticket to a recent flight arrival. Problems??? See the baggage window.

I virtually never check bags, but I did check one about 2-1/2 years ago to LAS. I had to go get a car rental picked up, etc., & when I came back 5 hours later it was still on the carousel with a new batch of bags.


User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22718 posts, RR: 20
Reply 17, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 6268 times:



Quoting Hatbutton (Reply 7):
I don't necessarily see how you can conclude a light rail is causing theft problems. There is plenty of bus access to airports that I can't see a light rail being the cause for increased luggage theft. Especially cause this particular story involves rampers. Sure a light rail gives you more access to the airport, but those that really wanted to steal won't just now decide to come do it being that there is a light rail now.

 checkmark The light rail in St. Louis has gone to the airport for some time (~15 years), and we don't have a big bag theft problem. If people are going to steal bags, they're going to do so regardless of how they get to the airport.

Quoting CrimsonNL (Reply 9):
At AMS there is a one way door so you cant walk in from the "outside" to the claim area, seems to me thats a lot "safer" then just acces from anybody into the claim area.

I think the question really comes down to how much of a problem bag theft is-- and how acceptable that level of theft is. If adopting the AMS arrangement at, say, ORD, would cost $10 million and eliminate 10 bag thefts a year, it's probably not worth it.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineContrails15 From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 5324 times:



Quoting Railker (Reply 15):
No access to keys for sure, but up here, the manual from the airline states that a bag can be searched (i.e. vibrating bags, only with cause). But there needs to be two witnesses, preferred to be from the airline, and a document signed by both witnesses and the ramper searching to state that the bag was searched and for what reason, and that document is left in the bag.

Well maybe some would want to look into a bag that was vibrating or making noise, but I don't get paid enough to take the risk. Its happened to me many times and I've notified my sup or manager who then gets the police.



Giants football!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
User currently offlineJetjeanes From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 1430 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 5245 times:

Just curious this guy lives in seattle what does he commute daily to Pdx


i can see for 80 miles
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12128 posts, RR: 52
Reply 20, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 5085 times:



Quoting CrimsonNL (Reply 9):
What surprised me at some US airports, the baggage claim belts were just 10 meters away from the street (domestic luggage) So you can just walk in, grab a suitcase and run! There was just 1 revolving door between the belt and the street!

At AMS there is a one way door so you cant walk in from the "outside" to the claim area, seems to me thats a lot "safer" then just acces from anybody into the claim area.

Thieft from airline baggage happens at every commerical airport in the world, including AMS.

Quoting Mayor (Reply 10):
I never understood, why, at ORD, they removed the people that checked your bag tags against your bag receipts when you left baggage claim. I realize it's a money saving issue, but this alone should help deter thefts. Now, you can just walk in, grab a couple of bags and walk back out.

This is not the problem that happened. These thiefts happened on the ramps, or under the terminals, where they are out of site. Although baggage is stolen from the baggage carosels, it is a 99% chance the person who owns that bag is standing there.

Quoting Upcfordcruiser (Reply 12):
I don't know how background checks work there but in Tx, rarely does an employer ever background check for misdemeanors, which is exactly what most thefts are. Unless you get caught numerous times or someone gets hurt (aggrivated robbery), it is almost never a felony.

Untrue. In Texas, and every other commerical airport in the US, there is a massive background check done on everyone who gets a SIDA badge. This includes fingerprints and a criminal background check. Some misdemeanors are not considered a problem, but thieft at any level of crime (felony or misdemeanor) within the last 10 years is a cause for denying a badge to be issued. That is how we do it at DFW. It is also done that way at IAH, HOB, DAL, SAN, ELP, AUS, LBB and everywhere else in TX. That is a TSA requirement, spelled out in CFR part 1542.


User currently offlineUpcfordcruiser From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 106 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4809 times:



Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 20):
Untrue. In Texas, and every other commerical airport in the US, there is a massive background check done on everyone who gets a SIDA badge. This includes fingerprints and a criminal background check. Some misdemeanors are not considered a problem, but thieft at any level of crime (felony or misdemeanor) within the last 10 years is a cause for denying a badge to be issued. That is how we do it at DFW. It is also done that way at IAH, HOB, DAL, SAN, ELP, AUS, LBB and everywhere else in TX. That is a TSA requirement, spelled out in CFR part 1542.

Thanks for the clarification. I was speaking more for general (non-airport) employers but that does clarify the criteria an employee has to meet before being hired. It's amazing how some people will throw away a clean history for trinkets and the occasional laptop.


User currently offlineContrails15 From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4667 times:



Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 20):
Quoting Upcfordcruiser (Reply 12):
I don't know how background checks work there but in Tx, rarely does an employer ever background check for misdemeanors, which is exactly what most thefts are. Unless you get caught numerous times or someone gets hurt (aggrivated robbery), it is almost never a felony.

Are you kidding me. Background checks are insane right now. My friend just got his customs seal renewed and they found out that he got arrested for loitering back when he was 17. He's 33 right now. He had to go to court and get the paper work from when it happened and summit it to US Customs and Board Patrol. For some reason they didn't pick it up the first time they got the seal which is another topic, but background checks are done with a fine tooth comb at JFK.



Giants football!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
User currently offlineAirNz From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4648 times:



Quoting Caryjack (Reply 2):
I suppose we should expect the same type of undesirable activity and begin to act accordingly. Any suggestions?

I see no viable reason for such an assumption and fully agree with Hatbutton (reply 7) in that light rail transport does not necessarily imply any such thing. I would respectfully suggest there is plenty of what you call 'undesirable activity' in your general area without light rail transport being involved.

Quoting Ramprat74 (Reply 11):
It's a whole easier for a crook to come in on the train, steal a bag from the claim belt, then hop right back on the train. I talk to plenty of the Port Police officers. They are the ones telling me, they are catching the crooks on the train.

That may be so and I wouldn't outrightly dispute it, but it also doesn't mean anything definitive.
I've also talked to a lot of police over the years and, unfortunately, many do like to spin their day

Quoting Ramprat74 (Reply 11):
Even though the woman wasn't charged. I believe NWA will still fire her.

On what legal basis if she has not committed a criminal act? She has no charges filed against her, let alone be convicted by a court.


User currently offlineRamprat74 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1521 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 4149 times:



Quoting AirNz (Reply 23):
On what legal basis if she has not committed a criminal act? She has no charges filed against her, let alone be convicted by a court.

She probably broke a few of NWA'a Code Of Conduct rules, like this one.

Engaging in conduct, on duty or off, that is or could be detrimental to the company or that could negatively affect the company's relationship with its customers, travel agents, suppliers, employees, or the public.

We will just have to wait and see.


25 DingDong : I realise that things related to the USA is not particularly popular in your eyes, but for better or worse, most employers in this country operates o
26 M404 : Jetjeanes Just curious this guy lives in seattle what does he commute daily to Pdx The article does not say he lives in Seattle. It (the lead story) s
27 SkyguyB727 : The airline is. I've also seen pax file fraudulent, missing bag claims when they actually have the bag. I don't understand why people would do that.
28 Greasemonkey : Everyone talks about locking their luggage, it doesn't do any real good. check around online and you can find out how easy it is to get in with just a
29 Cubsrule : OTOH, if the opportunistic thief has two identical bags next to each other-- one locked and one not-- the lock might be reason enough to steal from t
30 SYfan100 : I could not agree more with that. In the business I work in you have your people who just do not think. They steal either product or time theft was a
31 Nwaesc : She has not been fired, and is on paid leave while NWA continues their investigation. Not NWA. There is a due process she's entitled to, and we'll al
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