Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
BMW Gina Concept...Could It Be Used On Planes?  
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (5 years 8 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2985 times:

Some of you may have seen this video already:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pwabDeqVi8&feature=related

I was wondering if any of you thought this application could be used on aircraft, specifically to change the shape of the airfoil during different periods of flight for most economical operation. I know it's probably too complex to apply to airliners at this point in time, but it does raise some interesting design features that might be used in the future. Though, I do not know what type of substance is used on the car, and the rigidity of the skeletal structure of the vehicle, but it would be interesting to see what designers could come up with.

UAL

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline0NEWAIR0 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 939 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 8 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2981 times:

I'm pretty sure Boeing and Airbus are already working on it. Except their technology has to do with the shape of the wings/winglets and not the body of the plane.


"The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams."
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15781 posts, RR: 27
Reply 2, posted (5 years 8 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2961 times:

As far as practical use on aircraft, probably not. But this construction appears to be very similar to aircraft construction up until the 1930s and Zepplin construction.


Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineB6JFKH81 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2896 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (5 years 8 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2875 times:

If you think about it, we kind of saw this very early on in aviation...back when airframes were made of wood and skin was made of canvas.  old 

My concern with looking into making a modern version of this, like in the video, is the huge amount of mechanical things that will be needed to support such a design. That would be A LOT of moving parts, actuators, computer systems, etc. that are currently not on aircraft and could really turn into a maintenance or even operational nightmare real quick.



"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
User currently offlineUal747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (5 years 8 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2817 times:

Yeah, I wouldn't want to see what would happen if one wing decided to go "fat" during cruise while the other one stayed the same. Up and over!

UAL


User currently offlineNickMDW From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (5 years 8 months 3 days ago) and read 2705 times:



Quoting 0NEWAIR0 (Reply 1):
I'm pretty sure Boeing and Airbus are already working on it. Except their technology has to do with the shape of the wings/winglets and not the body of the plane.

It has to start somewhere.

http://blog.wired.com/cars/2009/02/new-wing-tips-w.html


User currently offlineB6JFKH81 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2896 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (5 years 8 months 3 days ago) and read 2681 times:



Quoting NickMDW (Reply 5):
It has to start somewhere.

http://blog.wired.com/cars/2009/02/n....html

Nice catch!

One point from that blog is:

"induce lower wing bending loads than fixed winglets"

This is one problem that Airbus has been going through. IIRC, the tests on a winglet for the A320 were stopped because of the extra weight that had to be added to beef up the wing due to this problem, and the shift in the bending moment of the wing as well.

Kind of freaky if you think about it though. You have a window seat and watch as the plane takes off and as you get closer to cruise altitude and speed you watch the wing get an erection LOL!  spit 



"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 7, posted (5 years 8 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2563 times:



Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
I was wondering if any of you thought this application could be used on aircraft, specifically to change the shape of the airfoil during different periods of flight for most economical operation.

In the short term, no, because the Gina concept uses a non-structural skin. All the load is carried by the skeleton and the skin is just providing aerodynamic fairing. Aircraft moved away from this type of construction towards monocoque and semi-monocoque structures back in the 30's (maybe 20's?) because it's considerably lighter.

With current materials technology, there's no way to employ something like Gina without going back to unstressed skin construction, which would have major weight penalties (not counting all the actuators, hinges, etc. to make it go).

Tom.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Can Handheld GPS Be Used On Planes To Check Speed? posted Mon Jan 14 2002 04:45:40 by Bobcat
Thai A380 To Be Used On BKK-LHR Route posted Sat Aug 9 2008 09:07:28 by Bochora
Dobbins ARB - Could It Be A 2nd Airport For ATL? posted Tue Jun 10 2008 13:43:54 by Hamfist
CVR And FDR In Aircraft - Could It Be Hosted? posted Sat Oct 14 2006 04:07:00 by Scalebuilder
Could It Be? Yes! Irish Aviation Thread 6 posted Tue Jun 13 2006 06:52:12 by Kaitak
Aeromexico 777 Where Could It Be Heading? posted Mon Mar 20 2006 06:42:49 by MIA767
Air Travel's "Golden Age"--Could It Be Repeated? posted Sun Nov 13 2005 16:57:11 by IcemanT37
Can Airband Radios Be Used On Aircraft? posted Tue May 10 2005 20:52:07 by Aerlingus330
Manchester - Could It Be A Major Hub? posted Thu Feb 3 2005 13:24:41 by Concorde001
Can It Be Carried On Board An A/c? posted Sun Nov 7 2004 19:48:38 by Soups