Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Smoking On Aircraft  
User currently offlineNjdevilsin03 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 731 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 9 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 6801 times:

When the airlines transitioned from allowing smoking on aircraft to no smoking on aircraft, how did the process of making it smoke free go? Did they have to re upholster all the seats? Change the carpets? Etc? I remember flying on 727's and 737's where the ash trays were sealed up. And how much did it cost each airline? Did the government offer any assistance with the transition? And which airline in the US was the last to allow smoking?


717, 727, 731, 732, 733, 734, 735, 73G, 738, 752, 753, 762, 763, 777, DC9, MD80, DC10, L1011, ERJ, CRJ, ATR, DH8, A300,
42 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMascmo From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 93 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 9 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 6768 times:

I can't imagine the process. It seems like when you step in a hotel room that is non smoking and someone has smoked there in the past that it still smells like smoke. Im not sure that smell ever goes away completely, I almost think it gets worse smelling with time.

User currently offlineImag From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2007, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 9 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 6663 times:

What amazed me on a recent Singapore Airlines A380 flight were the ashtrays located near the toilets. Given there are ashtrays now where else on the plane – any ideas why they are here?

Is it if the plane is sold on in years to come and an airline that buys it allows smoking then they are in place given the seats would probably be replaced) or is it in case someone lights up there is somewhere to dispose of the lit cigarette?


User currently offlineFatmirJusufi From Albania, joined Jan 2009, 2441 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (5 years 9 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 6564 times:

Something like that - captain smoking in the cockpit!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwqNb63aznM&feature=related



DO FLIGHTS. NOT FIGHTS.
User currently offlineTG992 From New Zealand, joined Jan 2001, 2910 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (5 years 9 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 6537 times:



Quoting Imag (Reply 2):
What amazed me on a recent Singapore Airlines A380 flight were the ashtrays located near the toilets. Given there are ashtrays now where else on the plane – any ideas why they are here?

The ashtrays are, I believe, a requirement of aviation regulations for certain countries - ie, if someone DOES smoke, they have a safe place to extinguish the cigarette.



-
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5915 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (5 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 6510 times:



Quoting Imag (Reply 2):
What amazed me on a recent Singapore Airlines A380 flight were the ashtrays located near the toilets. Given there are ashtrays now where else on the plane – any ideas why they are here?



Quoting TG992 (Reply 4):
The ashtrays are, I believe, a requirement of aviation regulations for certain countries - ie, if someone DOES smoke, they have a safe place to extinguish the cigarette.

That's correct. Further, ashtrays in the COCKPIT are also a requirement... weird as that is.

Part of a service check for a particular airplane I work on includes a step that says, "Verify presence and condition of "NO SMOKING IN LAVATORY" placard on lavatory door." The item immediately after it reads: "Verify presence of ashtray on lavatory door."

Ironic.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31702 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (5 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 6471 times:

The cost saving of removing all ashtrays on the SQ fleet of B747s contributed to a significant fuel saving over the time.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineAcabgd From Serbia, joined Jul 2005, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 6014 times:



Quoting FatmirJusufi (Reply 3):
Something like that - captain smoking in the cockpit!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwqNb...lated

AFAIK, some airlines still allow smoking in the cockpit.



CSud,D9,MD8x,D10,Trid,BAC1,A30,31,319,320,321,33,346,B71,72,73,74,75,76,77,L10,S20,A42,A72,T13,T15,F50,F70,F100,B146
User currently offlineKiwiinOz From New Zealand, joined Oct 2005, 2165 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5998 times:

I don't smoke anymore, but remember in my early smoking years lighting up on a plane. Bizarre to think of it now. And the smoking sections of aircraft were just awful.

It didn't get phased out in one clean sweep. Some airlines started with short haul flights first, some went before others.

I wouldn't be surpirsed if smoking still occurred on some airlines in Asia.


User currently offlineReality From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 506 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5988 times:



Quoting Njdevilsin03 (Thread starter):
how did the process of making it smoke free go?

The flight attendants announced that there is "no smoking" and people didn't smoke. Simple.


User currently offlineAviateur From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 1360 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5969 times:

NW, you might recall, was the first major carrier to go smoke-free throughout its entire network.

This was 1990 or so. Not that long ago.


PS



Patrick Smith is an airline pilot, air travel columnist and author
User currently offline767ER From Australia, joined Apr 2001, 1092 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5965 times:

They did it gradually 'down under'......NZ and QF first abolished smoking on domestic.....then trans tasman.......then the rest...the Japanese flights were the last to go IRCC.


Aircraft flown:F27,Viscount. EMB120, SAAB340, ATR70, 737-200.737-300,DC8, DC10,747-100,747-200,747-300,747-400, A320, A3
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 12, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5925 times:



Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 5):
Part of a service check for a particular airplane I work on includes a step that says, "Verify presence and condition of "NO SMOKING IN LAVATORY" placard on lavatory door." The item immediately after it reads: "Verify presence of ashtray on lavatory door."

It's an AD...... sorry, the number slips my mind right now...

Quoting Njdevilsin03 (Thread starter):
When the airlines transitioned from allowing smoking on aircraft to no smoking on aircraft, how did the process of making it smoke free go? Did they have to re upholster all the seats? Change the carpets? Etc? I remember flying on 727's and 737's where the ash trays were sealed up. And how much did it cost each airline? Did the government offer any assistance with the transition? And which airline in the US was the last to allow smoking?

I would say no to all of your questions... the airlines just no longer allowed it. I doubt seriously they made a major effort the redo the interiors. I remember it started with Delta back in the late '80's



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineRaffik From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2006, 1718 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5625 times:

My mother smoked and whenever we flew, we had to sit in the rear Smoking section of the aicraft. It was just awful. Very smokey and your clothes ended up smelling terrible after even the most shortest of flights.

However, I last had a cigarette on an aircraft in 2002, on an MEA A310 flying London to Beirut. They abolished their smoking section that year I believe.
I had run out of cigarettes and one of the cabin crew went into her handbag and gave me 10 Marlboro Lights! Talk about good service  yes 

Previous to that, when I had flown with JAT in 2001, the cabin crew were all in the rear galley smoking!

I am glad that smoking isn't allowed on aircraft any more. I don't smoke now, but even if I did, I would feel uncomfortable doing it. I always felt it was dangerous.



Happy -go- lucky kinda guy!
User currently offlineAcabgd From Serbia, joined Jul 2005, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5606 times:



Quoting Raffik (Reply 13):
I am glad that smoking isn't allowed on aircraft any more. I don't smoke now, but even if I did, I would feel uncomfortable doing it. I always felt it was dangerous.

I seem to remember there was a couple of emergencies due to people discarding lighted cigarettes in the lavatory trash bins?

Although, that might've happened after the flights were non-smoking - there was no need to smoke in lavatories prior to that  Smile



CSud,D9,MD8x,D10,Trid,BAC1,A30,31,319,320,321,33,346,B71,72,73,74,75,76,77,L10,S20,A42,A72,T13,T15,F50,F70,F100,B146
User currently offlineRaffik From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2006, 1718 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5578 times:

It wouldn't surprise me! I guess that's why the ashtrays are still there, incase somebody does light up!

I always dipped my ciggy in some water to ensure it was extinguished before I put it into the ashtray.



Happy -go- lucky kinda guy!
User currently offlineSeaBosDca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5768 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5549 times:



Quoting Raffik (Reply 13):
It was just awful. Very smokey and your clothes ended up smelling terrible after even the most shortest of flights.

 checkmark 

As a child I flew semiannually between SEA and GVA, and usually ended up with last-minute tickets and the resulting seats in the smoking section (or one or two rows forward of it, as if that makes any difference).

That was the experience that caused me to form my somewhat militant views on the rudeness of smoking in any public place, anywhere.

I'm also perplexed every time someone gets nostalgic about a supposed "golden age" of aviation -- think of how smoky those aircraft must have been!  yuck  vomit  yuck 


User currently offlineN702ML From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5509 times:

Just a bit of trivia....

I think one of the first jet US airlines that did not allow smoking at all was Muse Air well before any other airline even considered non-smoking flights or before any laws were passed prohibiting smoking.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Frank C. Duarte Jr.



Here is an interesting tidbit copied from museair.com:

"Soon after Southwest Airlines' purchase of the airline, Muse Air changed it's no-smoking policy to allow for designated smoking areas on board their flights. Muse Air predicted that up to 35% of their potential passengers were being lost because of the no-smoking policy. Yet less than a decade later, Delta Air Lines surveyed their passengers and found they would only lose up to 7% of their passengers. Clearly the country's attitudes towards smoking were quickly changing, but not fast enough for Muse Air."

The original FAA-mandated non-smoking laws began in April 1988 on domestic flights of less than 2 hours.

The law was expanded in February 1990 to include all flights between the 48 contiguous states and either Puerto Rico or the US Virgin Islands. The only exceptions were flights in excess of 6 hours between a point in the United States, Puerto Rico or the US Virgin Islands and a point in Alaska or Hawaii or any flight of more than 6 hours between a point in Alaska and a point in Hawaii.

[Edited 2009-02-28 06:52:52]

User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13170 posts, RR: 15
Reply 18, posted (5 years 9 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5509 times:

I recall in the USA, the transition was set by Federal law in 2 steps. At first, flights under 4 hours flight time banned smoking for a period of time, then all domestic USA flights no matter the length banned smoking. Penalties were increased for attemping to smoke on USA flights, especially in the toilet area and if tried to disable the smoke detector. The requirement for an ashtray in the toilet is probably so that people don't put a still hot cigarette into the paper filled waste bin and cause a fire or to jam the toilet systems.

As to changes in the seats and interiors after smoking was banned, most waited for when the a/c would get it's regular major cleaning or refitting of interior components. In some cases the ashtrays, which after the smoking bans became mainly a place to put chewed gum and gum wrappers, were pulled out and cover plates were put in over the remaining holes where the ashtrays were.


User currently offlineMAN2SIN2BKK From Germany, joined Feb 2009, 241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (5 years 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 5148 times:



Quoting Aviateur (Reply 10):
NW, you might recall, was the first major carrier to go smoke-free throughout its entire network.

This was 1990 or so. Not that long ago.

I flew Seoul to Tokyo and then Tokyo to Singapore in February 1998 on NW and smoking was allowed still; I was surprised checking in at Seoul being offered smoking or non smoking, aisle or window etc


User currently offlineC5LOAD From United States of America, joined Sep 2008, 917 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (5 years 9 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 5022 times:

What was the point of having certain rows for smoking? If you have designated rows throughout the a/c for smoking, it would still get into the vent system and circulate throughout the whole plane wouldn't it? So it would make nonsmoking sections a pointless gesture.


"But this airplane has 4 engines, it's an entirely different kind of flying! Altogether"
User currently offlineSkydrol From Canada, joined Oct 2003, 980 posts, RR: 10
Reply 21, posted (5 years 9 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4974 times:

Perfect example of the irony:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9iByYyMeEs

I remember the signs to designate rows where smoking was allowed and prohibited as shown in this video at about 0:43...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYXi17chj8I&fmt=18

It was amazing, the smoke would just magically stop at the first row of seats in the non-smoking section !



LD4



∙ ---{--« ∙ ----{--« ∙ --{-« ∙ ---{--« ∙ --{--« ∙ --{-« ∙ ----{--« ∙
User currently offlineZrs70 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 3206 posts, RR: 9
Reply 22, posted (5 years 9 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4920 times:

In 1986, I flew BOS-DEN on a CO DC-10. I asked for a seat as far forward in the cabin as possible, to be away from the smoking section.

Alas, in that particular aircraft, the smoking section was in the front of the plane!

(On the bright side, the DC-10's had "pub" service, and there was a coach lounge with a bar, pastries, and such).



14 year airliners.net vet! 2000-2013
User currently offlineKE7JFF From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 47 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (5 years 9 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4892 times:

I remember as a wee child of 4 flying ALB-RDU as the first leg in a family move to Grenoble, France where it seemed like the first class section was smoking but I am not certain. This would be circa 1989.

User currently offlineMoPac From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 215 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (5 years 9 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 4837 times:

Oh how I long for the days of hot boxing at FL350...

25 Andz : I non rev on standby sometimes and when SAA still allowed smoking I always ended up in the smoking section. What irritated me was people sitting in no
26 Pylon101 : As a smoker I keep wondering if any airlines still exist which allow smoking? In Africa or South America?
27 C5LOAD : Oh how I long for that kind of service to come back. Maybe in the distant future when airlines have their heads on straight again.
28 Acabgd : I'd love to hear about that as well. Although we did manage to turn some sports charters into smoking flights, with the friendly asistance from the (
29 474218 : Cigarette smoke (nicotine) was the best NDT method ever invented. Even the smallest crack in the fuselage would show up as a brown streak where the pr
30 LHR380 : What happened to that Smoking only airline that was gunna make an appearance. Flying from Hong Kong if I recall?
31 Pylon101 : I still think you meant not "nicotine" but "tar" as issue. C'mon, I am sure that modern technologies are able to separate tobacco minority from aggres
32 747buff : Domestic in 1988 Transatlantic around '95 or '96 I believe Transpacific in '98
33 Emaman : The last time I saw smoking allowed was Garuda from SIN-AMS in Oct 2000. I was quite surprised to see it allowed - been flying frequently since 96 hav
34 Viscount724 : Not that I'm aware of. They would be violating ICAO recommendations if they did permit it.
35 Post contains links Raffik : There was this one, but might not be the one you're on about http://www.boingboing.net/2006/06/28/allsmoking-airline-t.html
36 Acabgd : It's a recommendation, not a rule to be violated. Does PIA still allow smoking on domestic flights?
37 AmricanShamrok : Aer Lingus still has useable ashtrays on its older A330s...
38 LHR380 : Yea, that the one, Smintair. Looks like its not starting up though...... J
39 Captaink : I started working on the airport in 2002, and I am almost certain that Condor allowed smoking then. I remember the rear of the airplane smelling rath
40 Post contains links Jetplaner : Yea, that was the probable cause on Air Canada flight 797. It was en-route from DFW to YYZ when smoke started coming out of the rear lav. When the sm
41 LoveTheSkies : Actually, Delta was the first airline to go smokefree worldwide (Jan. 01, 1995). This is copied of the ANR's (Americans for nonsmokers' rights) smoke
42 Viscount724 : The relevant excerpt from the NTSB probable cause is "a fire of undetermined origin". While a discarded cigarette was a possibility, the fact that th
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Smoking On The Apron By Aircraft posted Thu Mar 6 2008 04:47:15 by RussianJet
Commission On Aircraft Sale, Lease posted Sat Dec 20 2008 06:22:47 by Vimanav
TSA Crawling On Aircraft? posted Thu Oct 2 2008 19:52:34 by B727LVR
Which Airlines Still Allow Smoking On Planes? posted Thu Oct 2 2008 13:31:03 by Deaphen
B763ER Repair on Nat Geographic: Question On Aircraft Livery posted Sun Sep 28 2008 19:30:30 by Themightydude
Should Airlines Ban Pax Own Food On Aircraft? posted Wed Aug 27 2008 15:27:24 by NorthstarBoy
Brig On Aircraft posted Mon Jul 14 2008 05:46:42 by SPR773
Should DOT Require Escape Stairs On Aircraft? posted Wed Jun 11 2008 00:04:02 by NorthstarBoy
Milk On Aircraft? posted Fri May 16 2008 20:14:43 by UPS707
Can Polluted Air On Aircraft Damage Health? posted Fri Apr 18 2008 08:05:51 by NEMA