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Jeffrey Skiles Back In The Cockpit  
User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1639 posts, RR: 1
Posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 7684 times:

Skiles was the F/O on the plane that ditched in the Hudson River. He has, already, done some simulator time to get back up to speed and will resume flying at the end of this month.

That is a real AVIATOR, folks. If you get thrown off a horse, get right back on.

That is reminiscent of the Spitfire and Hurricane pilots who got shot down in the morning and scrambled, again, in the afternoon in 1940 England.

Piece of Cake.

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1965 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 7657 times:

Ha, yea for sure. It is funny how some people can get back on the horse where there are others (like the fa sitting in the back) who have a much more difficult time facing down fear.

Good for him!

[Edited 2009-03-05 22:24:42]


Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2127 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 7311 times:



Quoting ThirtyEcho (Thread starter):
That is reminiscent of the Spitfire and Hurricane pilots who got shot down in the morning and scrambled, again, in the afternoon in 1940 England.

Except the 19-year old wartime pilots had a better-than-even chance of not surviving the afternoon, whereas an airline pilot may see one defining event in a 30-year career. Different set of cojones in my opinion.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineDingDong From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 661 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 7203 times:



Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 1):
It is funny how some people can get back on the horse where there are others (like the fa sitting in the back) who have a much more difficult time facing down fear.

Well, from what I understand, that FA suffered a pretty nasty leg injury and also had to contend with an idiot trying to inappropriately open an emergency exit door even while she had the leg injury... so I wouldn't rag on the FA in the back... That one was pretty tough and clear-headed despite the pain and fear!!

Perfectly understandable she'd need a little more time and space to readjust than most of the crew. Even the LGA? tower controller needed at least six weeks to fully come to terms with what he experienced, according to his public statements.

I'd cut everyone directly involved in this incident some slack, quite honestly. People experience things differently, after all.

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 1):
Good for him!

Indeed. Glad to hear about FO Skiles! bigthumbsup 



DingDong, honey, please answer the doorbell!
User currently offlineFLY2LIM From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1183 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 6978 times:



Quoting DingDong (Reply 3):
Well, from what I understand, that FA suffered a pretty nasty leg injury and also had to contend with an idiot trying to inappropriately open an emergency exit door even while she had the leg injury... so I wouldn't rag on the FA in the back... That one was pretty tough and clear-headed despite the pain and fear!!

... while having water up to her neck, as she described it on a couple of talk shows ... Her worst fear, apparently, was not to die from impact, it was to drown to death.
Funny how people have not said much about the dumb passenger who, essentially, caused the aircraft to start sinking faster by opening the back emergency exit without any assistance. I have seen her on the talk show circuit talking about her family and about how her life was spared, but said nothing of the fact she made a huge mistake. She also pulled out her cell phone and started using it, with little regard to the law and the communications systems for the plane at a critical stage.

As others have said, people deal with tragedies differently.

FLY2LIM



Faucett. La primera linea aerea del Peru.
User currently offlineAzjubilee From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 3799 posts, RR: 28
Reply 5, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 6947 times:

Good for him... getting back on the horse is the best way to heal any wounds IMO. Too bad Sully is too busy working the press junket and begging for change on the street corner.

User currently offlineFxramper From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 7129 posts, RR: 87
Reply 6, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 6929 times:

Glad he's back in the saddle.

Quoting Threepoint (Reply 2):
Except the 19-year old wartime pilots had a better-than-even chance of not surviving the afternoon, whereas an airline pilot may see one defining event in a 30-year career. Different set of cojones in my opinion.

Agree completely.  yes 

My grandfather was 20 years old, surving in the south Pacific with the 5th Air Force, when he was shot down and ditched his A-20 in the ocean. With one eye swollen shut he saved his gunner's life and a few days later, made it back to his group to fly another 21 missions before accepting orders to be sent home.


User currently offlineCatIII From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 2802 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 6844 times:



Quoting ThirtyEcho (Thread starter):
Skiles was the F/O on the plane that ditched in the Hudson River. He has, already, done some simulator time to get back up to speed and will resume flying at the end of this month.

That is a real AVIATOR, folks. If you get thrown off a horse, get right back on.

That is reminiscent of the Spitfire and Hurricane pilots who got shot down in the morning and scrambled, again, in the afternoon in 1940 England.

Look, I have TREMENDOUS respect for what the US1546 crew did. I take nothing away from their airmanship, skills, or heroics.

However, the RAF pilots got back into their fighters on the same day to launch into combat missions. F/O Skiles got back into the simulator a month and a half after the crash. I agree with what everyone on here has said: different people react to these events in different ways. I don't think you can compare them to each other.

Re: the F/A who was in the back, the impact forces ont he back of the airplane were, from what I understand, far greater then the forces on the front of the plane. She was very seiously injured, and understandably impacted emotionally. Give her a break, ok?


User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 10998 posts, RR: 52
Reply 8, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 6782 times:



Quoting CatIII (Reply 7):
Give her a break, ok?

Who's ragging on the FA?



Send me a PM at http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/sendmessage.main?from_username=NULL
User currently offlineLHRSpotter From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2006, 182 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 6755 times:



Quoting Azjubilee (Reply 5):
Too bad Sully is too busy working the press junket and begging for change on the street corner.

This statement alone is quite likely to cause a raging debate in a few hours, so brace yourself for some serious bashing.
My take on this matter is that if Captain Sullenberger is worried about his finances, he will now be in a position to get a massive (well deserved) boost to his consultancy business. I think he is campaigning about pilot pay in general and since his voice will now be heard this can only be good.

Shame about comments like yours though...


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 18704 posts, RR: 58
Reply 10, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 6733 times:



Quoting ThirtyEcho (Thread starter):
Skiles was the F/O on the plane that ditched in the Hudson River. He has, already, done some simulator time to get back up to speed and will resume flying at the end of this month.

One wonders if someone might find a way to finangle a promotion to Captain for him. I'd say he earned it.


User currently offlineAzjubilee From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 3799 posts, RR: 28
Reply 11, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 6675 times:

LHRspotter - if you had any clue how annoyed many pilots in the USA are with Sully you'd understand why I made the comment. Now he's an advocate for all airline pilots? He hasn't got the faintest idea of how GOOD his life is at USAirways when compared to other pilots in the industry. I'm not distracting from what he AND his crew did. I'm just so sick of the hype and fame this has attracted. Very little is ever mentioned of his crew. Every pilot when they go to work does their job with safety and comfort in mind. Day in and day out, we solve problems and deal with issues that don't make the news. The last thing we need is every pilots actions, decisions and comments compared to the all mighty Sully. He AND his crew were doing their jobs. Just like every other crew out there, each and every day.

Oh... I'm ready for the flaming, I knew my post would ruffle the feathers of some people.


User currently offlineTWAL1011727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 619 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 6611 times:



Quoting FLY2LIM (Reply 4):
She also pulled out her cell phone and started using it, with little regard to the law and the communications systems for the plane at a critical stage.

The said plane was powerless except for battery power, RAT power and possibly later APU.
I really dont think there was anything a cell phone could do to interrupt communications
at that particular time.
Concerning the law, I also don't think the FAA or other governmental body is gonna fine her.

Not trying to get on your bad side but....
Lets see what you do on an A/C getting ready to ditch/crash.
I definitely have no idea what I would do.

KD


User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2127 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 6501 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 10):
One wonders if someone might find a way to finangle a promotion to Captain for him. I'd say he earned it.

And every FO above him on the seniority list would take turns flogging him with a rubber hose should he accept such an offer.

Quoting Azjubilee (Reply 11):
Oh... I'm ready for the flaming, I knew my post would ruffle the feathers of some people.

Your post is fair in my opinion. Whatever flaming you receive won't compare to the beating I took just after the accident when I dared suggest the crew's actions weren't heroic.
Wheeee, that was fun.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 10998 posts, RR: 52
Reply 14, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 6479 times:



Quoting Threepoint (Reply 13):
Quoting DocLightning (Reply 10):
One wonders if someone might find a way to finangle a promotion to Captain for him. I'd say he earned it.

And every FO above him on the seniority list would take turns flogging him with a rubber hose should he accept such an offer.

Interestingly enough, he used to be a Captain at US Airways. He accepted a FO gig to not be furloughed, or something like that.



Send me a PM at http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/sendmessage.main?from_username=NULL
User currently offlineLHRSpotter From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2006, 182 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 6402 times:



Quoting Azjubilee (Reply 11):
He hasn't got the faintest idea of how GOOD his life is at USAirways when compared to other pilots in the industry.

I think it's exactly the opposite. He has been in the industry long enough, he must be realizing the situation all too well and hence the campaigning.

And about what they did: Of course they did exactly what they were being paid to do but just happened to be first crew anywhere to go through this. I don't have the slightest doubt that any other crew in that position would've achieved exactly the same positive result (I am saying this with a lot of irony, especially after some more recent events)...


User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8206 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 6273 times:



Quoting DingDong (Reply 3):
Even the LGA? tower controller needed at least six weeks to fully come to terms with what he experienced, according to his public statements.

I really felt bad for that guy. He was a key player in the event (whether it happened at all, etc). It was a true test for ATC. IMO the guy did a great job. But there on the tape, you hear the poignant silence. He was pretty sure those people were going to die. He desperately wanted to give 100% to try to save them, but he couldn't. Professionally, his worst nightmare was coming true, or so it seemed.


User currently offlineBEG2IAH From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 892 posts, RR: 15
Reply 17, posted (5 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 5923 times:
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Quoting FLY2LIM (Reply 4):
Funny how people have not said much about the dumb passenger who, essentially, caused the aircraft to start sinking faster by opening the back emergency exit without any assistance.

What I heard her say was that she was told later that the door got out of its frame so water was already rushing in. That passenger wanted to open the door, but it was already screwed up and leaking.

I still don't get it why he would try to open the door when the water was already rushing in.

BEG2IAH



FAA killed the purpose of my old signature: Use of approved electronic devices is now permitted.
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