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Minimum Altitude AGL Over Airport For GA Aircraft  
User currently offlineSuseJ772 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 794 posts, RR: 1
Posted (5 years 1 month 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 4857 times:

Alright all you ATC people out there. I was wondering what is typically a minimum altitude (AGL) above the airport that ATC will approve GA aircraft to fly directly over an airport.

For example, if I were to fly IFR RYY-ATL-DBN-HXD - using ATL and DBN as a waypoint, what altitude assuming normal operation would I have to climb to for ATC to be comfortable with me flying directly over ATL?


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10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMIgAiR54 From Spain, joined Jun 2007, 1483 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 1 month 6 days ago) and read 4828 times:

FL 350 they will be very comfortable. Big grin Big grin Big grin Big grin Big grin

Usually 3.000´ or 4.000´ it should be enought. But someone from ATL ATC could give you a real help in this.


User currently offlineMcdu From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 1436 posts, RR: 17
Reply 2, posted (5 years 1 month 6 days ago) and read 4818 times:



Quoting SuseJ772 (Thread starter):
For example, if I were to fly IFR RYY-ATL-DBN-HXD - using ATL and DBN as a waypoint, what altitude assuming normal operation would I have to climb to for ATC to be comfortable with me flying directly over ATL?

Not sure they still do it or not, but they used to let you fly directly over ATL at around 5,000'MSL. This was a VFR operation and as far as I know it was for north or southbound traffic only. 5K seemed to keep you below the downwind traffic.

If you are transiting ATL on an IFR flight plan, be prepared to enjoy the aerial version of I-285. You will fly low and around the arrival/departure paths for KATL.

Good Luck.


User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1965 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (5 years 1 month 6 days ago) and read 4788 times:

At YVR they get you to fly mid field at 2,500 feet, well thats the lowest I have asked for, except the time I went in and landed. If you were to file, I have a feeling that you will get lots of vectors and probably would be well away from ATL. I doubt they would have you cross mid field if you were IFR for such things as missed approaches and the like.

Good luck!



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offline727forever From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 793 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (5 years 1 month 6 days ago) and read 4786 times:



Quoting SuseJ772 (Thread starter):
For example, if I were to fly IFR RYY-ATL-DBN-HXD - using ATL and DBN as a waypoint, what altitude assuming normal operation would I have to climb to for ATC to be comfortable with me flying directly over ATL?

Good luck going over the top of ATL. Everytime that I have tried I would vectored around the corridors. This was years ago, but they took me nearly 20 miles east and then on course about 20-25 miles north/south of ATL. The problem is that they have jets descending on the downwind from 11,000' down to 5,000' before they turn them to a 20 mile base. Departing traffic is cleared to 10,000' so the airspace must be clear for them to climb as well for nearly 20 miles off of the departure end. If you wanted to go over the top I would say the minimum would be 12,000'. When I would do this trip I learned to just stop for fuel somewhere in the ATL area which seemed to help as they would still vector me around ATL traffic, but I would be held down at a lower altitude closer to on course below the arrivals than if I had stayed up at a normal cruise altitude. Good luck and have a good trip.

727forever



727forever
User currently offlineJkudall From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 615 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (5 years 1 month 6 days ago) and read 4774 times:

There isn't really any definite rule governing how low you can fly directly over a controlled airport, as long as it meets all the other altitude requirements. ATC would obviously have a say in it though and it is all airport specific.

This depends on a lot of factors such as airspace, landing patterns, traffic flow, etc.

At SLC, there is a published transition route through the Class B airspace which has you fly over the approach ends of whatever runways are in use at roughly 1300 to 1800' AGL (5500-6000' MSL) which always gives a great view of the airport. And by flying over the approach ends of the runway you aren't hindering any arriving or departing traffic either so it is never really a problem. It is pretty cool flying over the runway and a 757, 1000' below just as it is on short final. If I wanted to fly directly over the airport midfield, I could certainly request it from the tower but I probably wouldn't get it unless I timed it perfectly when there are no planes arriving or departing (which is almost never).

As for ATL, it really depends how low you want to go. If you want to get lower, you would obviously need a Class B clearance (assuming you were VFR) and would need to make a request with ATC. The worst that could happen is they say no. Otherwise, you can fly over the airport outside of class B airspace (I am guessing 10,000 MSL for ATL), assuming there isn't any other restrictive airspace. But that is rather high.

[Edited 2009-03-12 09:07:18]

User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3825 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (5 years 1 month 6 days ago) and read 4758 times:



Quoting Jkudall (Reply 5):
This depends on a lot of factors such as airspace, landing patterns, traffic flow, etc.

As well as above power lines and tall buildings.



Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineJkudall From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 615 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (5 years 1 month 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 4753 times:

One other thing...

If you file IFR for a flight over ATL, I can almost guarantee you won't get very close to the airport. In fact, they would probably ammend your flight plan for you and direct you well away from the airport. You are probably better off VFR.

Quoting Confuscius (Reply 6):
As well as above power lines and tall buildings.

Yes, I hope so.  Smile


User currently offlineRJ111 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (5 years 1 month 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 4710 times:

An Aerdrome Traffic Zone is 2,000ft in a 2nm or 2.5nm radius in the UK.

MATZ (military) is 3,000ft around 5nm, with two stubs in the direction of the runway.

But larger Airports will have a CTR (control zone) which will extend to a specified height.

You need radio permission to enter any of the above.

Correct me if i'm wrong.

Edit: Heh, having read the thread more you probably all knew that anyway.

[Edited 2009-03-12 10:42:48]

User currently offlinePizzapolli From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 243 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 1 month 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 4689 times:

At LAX I've flown the Mini Route many a times directly over the airport and you do that at 2500 feet. Then there is also the Special Flights Rules area over LAX that takes you directly over the field at 3500 MSL southbound and 4500 MSL northbound.

User currently offlineSuseJ772 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 794 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (5 years 1 month 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 4605 times:



Quoting Jkudall (Reply 5):
Otherwise, you can fly over the airport outside of class B airspace (I am guessing 10,000 MSL for ATL), assuming there isn't any other restrictive airspace. But that is rather high.

ATL it is 12,500 if outside class B and VFR. Not really looking to climb a 172 to 12,500 out of RYY (about 28 miles from ATL) - plus I would still have to go through Class B to get to 12,500 - thus not solving much of my problem  wink 

Quoting Pizzapolli (Reply 9):
At LAX I've flown the Mini Route many a times directly over the airport and you do that at 2500 feet. Then there is also the Special Flights Rules area over LAX that takes you directly over the field at 3500 MSL southbound and 4500 MSL northbound.

I know! The LAX shots I have seen from Daniel Werner is what got me thinking about it in the first place.

It seems "relatively" easy to fly over LAX, but I haven't seen much the same for other airports. Hence the curiosity about ATL (that and it would be "on the way" to Hilton Head - which is how I plan to build my hours once I start my PPL).



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