Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Did BA Consider The A300?  
User currently offlineMCO2BRS From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2007, 540 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 7916 times:

Did British Airways ever consider the A300? I've never seen any reference or picture of BA having it, but I recently came across two die-cast models of an A300 in BA's Landor livery that I bought when I was a kid, circa 1997. This has made me wonder if they were considering it but didn't take it.

Cheers!

MCO-2-BRS

21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAlangirvan From New Zealand, joined Nov 2000, 2106 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 7814 times:

They may have sort of considered it during the 1960s when they really did not want to buy anything from Europe. The L10 won the competition. Ah, what would the A300 have been with RR engines, right from the start. Also, during the late 70s, the A310 was a finalist in a competition which was won by the 757.

If you visit an airline's Engineering Department, you will see all sorts of models of aircraft that were nearly operated by that airline.


User currently offlineFCKC From France, joined Nov 2004, 2348 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 7498 times:

As Alangirvan says England considered the A300 in the 60s , (B2 version at that time) , but to be more precise , BA was not yet born.
It was BEA (British European Al) who had a look at it.
The other English airline was BOAC (British Overseas Al Corp) .
BEA + BOAC gave BA at the merger.

BEA went Tristar , as it has British engines , but in fact they never received any L1011s , as at the time of delivery , they didn't exist anymore , having merged with BOAC , and thus the first Tristar has been delivered to British Aw.
Only one Tristar had BEA livery , this was the demonstrator at the Farnborough Air Show.


User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 7393 times:



Quoting FCKC (Reply 2):
As Alangirvan says England considered the A300 in the 60s , (B2 version at that time) , but to be more precise , BA was not yet born.
It was BEA (British European Al) who had a look at it.
The other English airline was BOAC (British Overseas Al Corp) .
BEA + BOAC gave BA at the merger.

English and British are two very different things.......think you are certainly confusing them there. You're also forgetting several other airlines!


User currently offlineEDICHC From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 7222 times:



Quoting FCKC (Reply 2):
As Alangirvan says England considered the A300 in the 60s , (B2 version at that time) , but to be more precise , BA was not yet born.
It was BEA (British European Al) who had a look at it.
The other English airline was BOAC (British Overseas Al Corp) .
BEA + BOAC gave BA at the merger.



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 3):
English and British are two very different things.......think you are certainly confusing them there.

No more so than BA do themselves!  Wink  duck 


User currently offlineBabybus From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 7182 times:

I believe at the time what was then BEA said they would never buy Airbus.

They purchased the L1011 which also caused a lot of controversy at the time due to their size and un-needed capacity. They were intended for the London-Paris and London-Frankfurt routes.

By the time the L1011 turned up BEA was no more and they were now BA aircraft.

It's amazing how things have changed since then. BA must now be 90% Airbus aircraft and also a world leading airline.


User currently offlineRichardw From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 3750 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 7162 times:



Quoting Babybus (Reply 5):
BA must now be 90% Airbus aircraft

Gosh is it really?


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3595 posts, RR: 29
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 7135 times:

BA was also nicknamed "Boeing Always" for many years.

User currently offlineVeeseeten From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2008, 169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 7112 times:



Quoting Babybus (Reply 5):
also a world leading airline.

Some might say that they've done a flip flop on that!* I'm pretty sure that, at its peak, BA was Europe's largest airline by quite a long way - which certainly isn't the case anymore. Can anyone verify that? Or maybe provide some stats about passenger numbers (relative to the time) and/or fleet size?


*.....not I though, long live BABig grin


User currently offlineScouseflyer From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2006, 3390 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 7049 times:



Quoting Richardw (Reply 6):
Quoting Babybus (Reply 5):
BA must now be 90% Airbus aircraft

Gosh is it really?

Not yet, the latest figures I can find are:
Airbus

A32X - 78

Boeing:
B737 - 21
B747 - 55
B757 - 11 (may be less by now)
B767 - 21
B777 - 42

The 757s are being retired currently and the 767's will be replaced by 787's eventually. Some of the 747s will be reaplced by the A380s from 2012 onwards nowhere near all B as an airline but nowhere near all A either.


User currently offlineRichardw From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 3750 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 6925 times:



Quoting Scouseflyer (Reply 9):
nowhere near all B as an airline but nowhere near all A either

Exactly.


User currently offlineCHRISBA777ER From UK - England, joined Mar 2001, 5964 posts, RR: 62
Reply 11, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 6911 times:



Quoting Richardw (Reply 6):
Quoting Babybus (Reply 5):
BA must now be 90% Airbus aircraft

Gosh is it really?

233 AIRFRAMES TOTAL:


AIRBUS

Airbus A318-100 - 2
Airbus A319-100 - 33
Airbus A320-200 - 34
Airbus A321-200 - 11

= 80

BOEING

Boeing 737-300 - 3
Boeing 737-400 - 19
Boeing 737-500 - 2
Boeing 747-400 - 55
Boeing 757-200 - 11
Boeing 767-300ER - 21
Boeing 777-200 - 3
Boeing 777-200ER - 39

= 153

FUTURE DELIVERIES

Airbus A320-200 - 17
Airbus A380-800 - 12
Boeing 777-300ER - 6
Boeing 787-8 - 8
Boeing 787-9 - 16

CURRENT PERCENTAGE = AIRBUS 34.4% / 65.6% BOEING

TOTAL INCLUDING ON-ORDER AIRFRAMES = AIRBUS 37.3% / 62.7% BOEING

One in the eye for the cheerleaders who think nobody in Europe buys Boeing because we are all anti-competitive, self-interested Europhiles....

Just for a giggle - lets say BA do their end-of-year fleet renewal order tomorrow and it is:

A388 x 10
A359 x 35
A350-10 x 25

= 70 more Airbus airframes and not a sausage for the Seattle boys.

This gives us 179 Airbus and Boeing 183 - still only a 49.45% / 50.50% split STILL IN BOEING'S FAVOUR.

So much for being mostly Airbus eh?



What do you mean you dont have any bourbon? Do you know how far it is to Houston? What kind of airline is this???
User currently offlineCHRISBA777ER From UK - England, joined Mar 2001, 5964 posts, RR: 62
Reply 12, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 6873 times:

Back on topic - I've always thought a BA Landor A300-605R would have been a handsome aircraft.

I read a book a while back which was written in the early 80s and set in the mid-80s, and the hero (a British spy/intelligence type chappie IIRC) took a flight out of Moscow to Heathrow on a very comfy BA A300.

Was one of these "The Russians will elect someone mental and they will bring back Stalin-esque Communism, nuke everyone and eat lots of caviar" type efforts as i recall. There are hundreds of books like that!

Frederick Forsyth maybe?



What do you mean you dont have any bourbon? Do you know how far it is to Houston? What kind of airline is this???
User currently offlineGisors From France, joined Apr 2008, 46 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 6765 times:



Quoting Veeseeten (Reply 8):
BA was Europe's largest airline by quite a long way - which certainly isn't the case anymore. Can anyone verify that? Or maybe provide some stats about passenger numbers (relative to the time) and/or fleet size?

Europe's leading airlines (2008):

- in terms of pax boarded:
1. LH 54.7 mln
2. AF 49,9 mln
3. BA 33.6 mln
4. KL 23.8 mln

- in terms of revenue passengers/km BA comes much closer to LH and AF, due to their strong presence on intercontinental destinations:
1. AF 129.7 bln
2. LH 126,3 bln
3. BA 115.5 bln
4. KL 77.5 bln

All in all BA is still *possibly* leading European airline on long haul.

Their position in freight transport is on the other hand strangely weak, well behind LH, AF, Cargolux and even KL.


User currently offlineVeeseeten From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2008, 169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 6275 times:

Ah sorry - I think you mis-interpreted, my question was more about BA's size and position in the late 70's to mid-90's!

User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4009 posts, RR: 33
Reply 15, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 6146 times:

Back to the A300.

I think it was on the cards but
The British Government withdrew from the Airbus consortium.
The British Government bailed out Rolls Royce when it went bankrupt.
Airbus would not put the RB211 on the A300.
BEA was a government ruled organisation.
They had no choice but to buy the Tristar with the British engine on it when the A300 had little British content.


User currently offlineBreiz From France, joined Mar 2005, 1917 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 5375 times:



Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 15):
when the A300 had little British content.

Your comments are correct, but the last one is misleading. The wings were British designed and produced. Not a minor item.
And BEA was set on the BAC 3-11 with RR engines.


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4009 posts, RR: 33
Reply 17, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 5256 times:



Quoting Breiz (Reply 16):
The wings were British designed and produced. Not a minor item.

Yes but they were produced as a private venture by HS.
It is easy to forget how much control the Government had in those days.


User currently offlineShankly From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 1543 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 4647 times:



Quoting Breiz (Reply 16):
And BEA was set on the BAC 3-11 with RR engines

Beat me too it Breiz

BAC3-11

Another "what might have been" for the UK aircraft industry



L1011 - P F M
User currently offlineMCO2BRS From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2007, 540 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3120 times:



Quoting CHRISBA777ER (Reply 12):
Back on topic - I've always thought a BA Landor A300-605R would have been a handsome aircraft.

I quite like the models I have, they are definitely unique. I think the actual model I have is more the earlier one as it doesn't have the small fences at the wingtips. Unfortunately I played with them a lot when I was kid, so they aren't in the best of condition, but you can certainly appreciate them for their aesthetic.

Purely based on the fact they have the Landor c/s I would have said it dated from the 80's, thanks for all the info guys, it's always great to have the Anet crowd answer life's aviation mysteries!

Cheers

MCO-2-BRS


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25346 posts, RR: 22
Reply 20, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2941 times:



Quoting FCKC (Reply 2):
BEA + BOAC gave BA at the merger.

It depends on the context since BA was also BOAC's IATA code prior to the merger with BEA. When the discussion involves longhaul routes I usually consider "BA" as inclusing both the current BA plus BOAC.


User currently offlineBrilondon From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 4229 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 2599 times:



Quoting Babybus (Reply 5):
It's amazing how things have changed since then. BA must now be 90% Airbus aircraft and also a world leading airline.

You need to check you facts. You must have too much french wine my friend. They have more Boeing aircraft then Airbus, although if you break down the fleet...oh, my mistake they are still a predominantly a Boeing airline.



Rush for ever; Yankees all the way!!
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
What Else Did AA Consider During A300 Order? posted Sat Aug 19 2006 20:33:41 by JAM747
Where Did BA Get The GE-powered A319s And A320s? posted Fri Dec 19 2003 22:02:53 by Thrust
Why Did American Buy The A300-600R? posted Fri Nov 23 2001 20:21:11 by TranStar
Why Did BA Opt For The Trent895 As Opposed To 892? posted Sun Aug 12 2007 01:26:17 by EA772LR
Did Airbus Try To Sell The A300-600ST To FedEx? posted Tue May 15 2007 13:06:27 by EI321
Why Will BA Not Consider The A350? posted Sat Aug 20 2005 18:56:45 by Gilesdavies
Did Balair Ever Operate The A300? posted Fri Nov 12 2004 21:49:12 by DeltaWings
When Did The A300 And A310 Production Stop? posted Mon Jul 19 2004 03:20:19 by TriJetFan1
Did Air Canada Ever Consider The 777? posted Sun Jun 17 2001 20:43:41 by Teej13
BA And The GE90 posted Sun Feb 15 2009 17:19:31 by Mascmo
Why Will BA Not Consider The A350? posted Sat Aug 20 2005 18:56:45 by Gilesdavies
Did Balair Ever Operate The A300? posted Fri Nov 12 2004 21:49:12 by DeltaWings