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"Is There A Physician On The Plane?"  
User currently offlineDoclightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 20249 posts, RR: 59
Posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11654 times:

So I'm sitting in an interesting lecture at work right now about in-flight medical emergencies.

Here are some things I've learned.

1) 1 in 333-1900 flights has a serious medical event. 1 in 10k-40k pax has a serous medical event. 1 in 1M-5M passengers dies on a plane with 21-72 deaths in-flight year nationally. Although AA alone reported 40 deaths in 2005.

2) The most common complaints are (in order) 1) vasovagal (fainting) 2) cardiac 3) neurological (seizures, etc.), 4) gastrointestinal (vomiting/diarrhea) 5) respiratory 6) trauma (usually head strikes from the overhead bins or scalds).

3) MedLink global response service has contracts with >88 airlines and gets about 60 calls/day. )Interestingly, the marketing website for Medlink shows the doctors in the ground center wearing their white coats and stethoscopes. What they are going to do with a stethscope for a patient 6 miles in the sky and thousands of miles away is beyond me.  Wink )

4) No history of any passenger volunteer being sued for providing in-flight assistance.

5) Domestic U.S. aircraft have a much more limited on-board medkit than international or foreign craft. This is because U.S. law basically treats planes as "flying taxies" and thus limits the medications they can have aboard. The kits do not have antiepileptic drugs on domestic US flights. (can someone verify this? We've had some conversations about it on the board.)

Also, about AED's: QF did a study over 64 months. This covered 203,191 flight segments and 31M pax. flights. During this time, the AED's were used 109 times 63 for monitoring and 46 for arrests.

anyway, cool talk.

57 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8956 posts, RR: 60
Reply 1, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11584 times:
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Quoting Doclightning (Thread starter):
6) trauma (usually head strikes from the overhead bins or scalds).

Does this also include turbulence-related injuries from unbelted pax and FAs?

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineTomFoolery From Austria, joined Jan 2004, 529 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11534 times:

This is very interesting. Thanks for passing this on.


Paper makes an airplane fly
User currently offlineAirbuster From Netherlands, joined Mar 2007, 454 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11536 times:

Interesting but why is there such a big range in the numbers you quote, are there not hard numbers? I mean there's a difference between 1 in 333 and 1 in 1900, i'm sure that some better statistics must be available.

thanks anyway for posting.

rgds

AB



FLY FOKKER JET LINE!
User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11434 times:

I know some people will disagree with me but if you're going to have an unexpected medical situation an airplane isn't the worse place to have one...

1. Unless you're on a 19 seater, there's a F/A on your flight who knows extensive first aid and who isn't afraid to help if your having a medical emergency. Only 33% of those people on the ground who need CPR get it because people are to afraid to help. On a plane your 100% guaranteed to get it.

2. An AED is guaranteed to be on board and again there's someone trained and who knows how to use it.

3. This is from a couple years ago but NWA said that 96% of its flights have a medical professional on board. (EMT, Nurse, or Doctor) When people have a medical emergency on the ground I doubt 96% of them have a doctor within close range.

4. As stated above, in the rare event there is no medical professional on board, F/As can call MedLink or a similar service. I'm not sure if this is right but I think (I may be wrong) EWRCabinCrew said in an old thread that he gave a passenger an injection from the med kit under the direction of MedLink. Again, I'm not sure if I am remembering this right.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 20249 posts, RR: 59
Reply 5, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11391 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 4):
I know some people will disagree with me but if you're going to have an unexpected medical situation an airplane isn't the worse place to have one...

It's not the WORST (the top of Mt. Everest is probably worse) but it's pretty near the bottom of the list of places I want to be if I have one.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):

Does this also include turbulence-related injuries from unbelted pax and FAs?

That's actually a relatively rare cause. But because when it happens it usually affects multiple pax on the same flight and scares people, it gets more press.

Quoting Doclightning (Thread starter):

5) Domestic U.S. aircraft have a much more limited on-board medkit than international or foreign craft. This is because U.S. law basically treats planes as "flying taxies" and thus limits the medications they can have aboard. The kits do not have antiepileptic drugs on domestic US flights. (can someone verify this? We've had some conversations about it on the board.)

So I got some clarification from the lecturer. Apparently, in the U.S. carriers are REQUIRED to have a less extensive kit than they are internationally. However, they are NOT PROHIBITED from having advanced medical kits aboard, and many carriers do choose to have more than the basic kit.

Thus, if your U.S. domestic carrier does carry the whole shebang on all A/C, that's why.

Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 4):
1. Unless you're on a 19 seater, there's a F/A on your flight who knows extensive first aid and who isn't afraid to help if your having a medical emergency. Only 33% of those people on the ground who need CPR get it because people are to afraid to help. On a plane your 100% guaranteed to get it.

If you're on a widebody and you can get the patient to an open spot of floor (like the galley) then you can do OK. If you're on a WN 737 or a CRJ then you're pretty screwed because you simply don't have enough room to do good CPR.


User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 11295 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 5):
It's not the WORST (the top of Mt. Everest is probably worse) but it's pretty near the bottom of the list of places I want to be if I have one.

Well if the airplane can quickly land its not that bad but if you're over the mid-pacific its not good.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 5):
If you're on a widebody and you can get the patient to an open spot of floor (like the galley) then you can do OK. If you're on a WN 737 or a CRJ then you're pretty screwed because you simply don't have enough room to do good CPR.

The PAX can be laid across the seats and the rescuer can go in the space between the seats and perform CPR.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineMoose135 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2382 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 11214 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 6):
Well if the airplane can quickly land its not that bad but if you're over the mid-pacific its not good.

Define "quickly"...if you are at altitude, even over a major airport, it's probably going to be 20 minutes or more until you are on the ground and medical personnel can reach you. In most places, I would suspect you would have a quicker response, whether it's EMTs, ambulance, FD, etc. if you are on the ground and call for assistance.

Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 6):
The PAX can be laid across the seats and the rescuer can go in the space between the seats and perform CPR.

But you need a solid surface under the patient for effective CPR. Seat cushions probably wouldn't work well.



KC-135 - Passing gas and taking names!
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14132 posts, RR: 62
Reply 8, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 11188 times:

Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 6):
The PAX can be laid across the seats and the rescuer can go in the space between the seats and perform CPR.

Did you ever have to carry out CPR in earnest (I did, though not sucessfully)? You'lll need a solid surface beneath the patient to be able to compress the thorax properly. Also you'll need working space. What you suggest is impossible. First, the seat cushions are much too soft, secondly, with today's seat pitches, it is impossible to work. Getting the patient into a galey and stretching him out on the floor is the only option.

Then, many airlines just opt for the cheapest first aid kit mandatet by regulations. Most big mainline carrier have a defibrilator and an additional doctor's kit on board though, containing laryngoskope, tracheal tubes, a suction aparatus, various strong, injectable medications, a stetoskope, blood pressure apparatus, plasma expander or other carrier fluid for infusions, syringes and hypodermic neddles etc.
This kit is only to be used by a meddical professional (physician, registered nurse, trained paramedic), not by the cabin crew.

Jan

[Edited 2009-03-17 14:44:47]

User currently offlineTavong From Colombia, joined Jul 2001, 836 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 11167 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 6):
The PAX can be laid across the seats and the rescuer can go in the space between the seats and perform CPR.

Not without breaking the patient's neck, you at least need some hard floor to make basic maneuvers. Not talking about heart massage if you can't get an airway clear.


Gus
SKBO



Colombian coffee, the best...take a cup and you will see how delicious it is.
User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 11149 times:



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 8):
Did you ever have to carry out CPR in earnest

No, fortunately I have not. The aisle, although narrow may also work.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 11, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 11133 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 4):
Only 33% of those people on the ground who need CPR get it because people are to afraid to help. On a plane your 100% guaranteed to get it.

33% because they are afraid or 33% because someone does not know how? I'm trained in both cpr and first aid (eagle scout) and if the situation ever presented itself, I would begin treatment.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 11065 times:



Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 11):
33% because they are afraid or 33% because someone does not know how? I'm trained in both cpr and first aid (eagle scout) and if the situation ever presented itself, I would begin treatment.

Afraid that they're going to get sued or don't know it. If I was ever in a situation where someone went into cardiac arrest I would only do CPR under the guidance of the 911 operator or if a family member or friend needed it. I would be afraid that a strangers family would sue me.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2843 posts, RR: 45
Reply 13, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 10896 times:

Hey, Doc; I'm glad that you brought this one up. I am a Captain for a US major airline, and have flown both International and domestic, currently domestic. I know of no prohibition against carrying a more extensive set of equipment domestically, and most of our fleet does carry the full complement at all times, but I have heard that epinephrine has been removed from some domestic kits because of differing reactions in individuals. I have not yet heard this from our maintenance people, and I'm not opening the kit to check for myself. My guess is that this is a lawyer-driven decision because epinephrine can have a wide degree of effects on an individual patient. To me it seems wise to have it onboard to be used by a qualified individual if it's needed. What's your input on this? Is it scary enough to warrant removing from the plane? I would be appreciative to get any thoughts you have on the issue, via PM if you don't want them on the board, as this is something I have been planning to bring up at a meeting scheduled for next week. Thanks in advance for your insight!

User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 14, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 10884 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 12):
Afraid that they're going to get sued or don't know it. If I was ever in a situation where someone went into cardiac arrest I would only do CPR under the guidance of the 911 operator or if a family member or friend needed it. I would be afraid that a strangers family would sue me.

It's called the "good Samaritan law" go look it up.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 10850 times:



Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 14):
It's called the "good Samaritan law" go look it up.

Yeah but I have no formal training, my employer basically handed me a pamphlet on it and had me read a poster and then told me I should do CPR on someone if they go into cardiac arrest but I wasn't required to since I'm not a trained rescuer. Saying, "I read a pamphlet on it" in court wouldn't be to convincing to a jury I'm afraid.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 16, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 10767 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 15):
Yeah but I have no formal training, my employer basically handed me a pamphlet on it and had me read a poster and then told me I should do CPR on someone if they go into cardiac arrest but I wasn't required to since I'm not a trained rescuer. Saying, "I read a pamphlet on it" in court wouldn't be to convincing to a jury I'm afraid.

Then you shouldn't be trying anyways. Im not a "trained rescuer" either, but I know what Im doing and if the person should sadly not make it, the GS law protects you.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineHaggis79 From Germany, joined Jun 2006, 1096 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 10738 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 12):
If I was ever in a situation where someone went into cardiac arrest I would only do CPR under the guidance of the 911 operator or if a family member or friend needed it. I would be afraid that a strangers family would sue me.

don't know about the law in the US - but in Germany you can't be sued if you genuinely were trying to help, even if you made things worse. You can, however, be sued (and charged) for not attempting to help....



300 310 319/20/21 332/3 343 AT4/7 143 B19 732/3/4/5/G/8/9 742/4 752/3 763/4 77E/W CR2/7/9 D95 E45/70 F50 F70 100 M11 M90
User currently offlineHaggis79 From Germany, joined Jun 2006, 1096 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 10727 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 15):

Yeah but I have no formal training, my employer basically handed me a pamphlet on it and had me read a poster and then told me I should do CPR on someone if they go into cardiac arrest but I wasn't required to since I'm not a trained rescuer. Saying, "I read a pamphlet on it" in court wouldn't be to convincing to a jury I'm afraid.

sorry for posting twice, but I've just seen this post now. My advice on this: go and have some first-aid training - not just for your work, but also to be able to help in an emergency situation when a family member or friend needs some urgent help. A course which teaches CPR and some basic applying of bandages does not take longer than one weekend and shouldn't be expensive, but it may enable you to save a life one day. Just a thought.



300 310 319/20/21 332/3 343 AT4/7 143 B19 732/3/4/5/G/8/9 742/4 752/3 763/4 77E/W CR2/7/9 D95 E45/70 F50 F70 100 M11 M90
User currently offlineChrisjw From United States of America, joined Jan 2009, 123 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10611 times:



Quoting Haggis79 (Reply 17):

Sadly in the U.S. it's not that way. I have 2 friends who just got finished becoming certified EMT's. If they don't have permission to treat you, they can sue you. It goes that way with a anyone. It happens pretty often actually, more than one might expect. The instructor was telling my friends about people who will act unconscious and when the EMT 'goes to work on them' they will 'wake up' and sue them for Battery simply because they had nothing to do that day.

Now whether or not the case stands up in court is a whole other issue. But sadly it does happen.


User currently offlineHaggis79 From Germany, joined Jun 2006, 1096 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10571 times:



Quoting Chrisjw (Reply 19):
Now whether or not the case stands up in court is a whole other issue. But sadly it does happen.

well, ok, I guess people could theoretically sue you in Germany as well - but with no hope of success: for legal action, the public attorney's office would have to take action, but they won't as they know there's no chance of success.

Then of course, people could start civil action - but if they loose (which is almost 100% certain due to the German law), they have to pay their own attorney, the attorney of the opposite side plus the court fees. So I guess no one in their right mind would do so.

It is actually a different matter if a certified medical doctor treats you wrongly - in that case, civil action could end with him having to pay some form of compensation. The difference is that the law assumes the certified doctor should exactly have known what he's doing - unlike the untrained first aid helper who just tried his best to help. I guess the law is also set up like that so as not to be a deterrent from people to administrate first aid.



300 310 319/20/21 332/3 343 AT4/7 143 B19 732/3/4/5/G/8/9 742/4 752/3 763/4 77E/W CR2/7/9 D95 E45/70 F50 F70 100 M11 M90
User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 4040 posts, RR: 28
Reply 21, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10573 times:



Quoting Doclightning (Thread starter):
4) No history of any passenger volunteer being sued for providing in-flight assistance.

Not totally related, but I have a friend of mine who was once called to provide medical assistance on a flight to a patient who was having an epilepsy attack (he is a dentist, not an MD, btw). There were no anti-epileptic medications on-board but there was some valium to calm down the seizures. The medical officer on the ground wanted him to shoot up the valium on the patient but since according to him it doesn't really stop the attack (only the physical motion during the seizures) and the patient didn't want it he refused to give it (partly because he feared the consequences). What did happen, however, was a flight attendant coming to him and telling him "The Captain wants to inform you that he has the authority to mandate you to give the shots", to which he replied "Well, if the Captain feels so strongly about that then he can come over and give the shot himself". I would have preferred a "I'll let the captain tell me how to treat a patient if he lets me tell him how to land a plane", myself.

Quoting Doclightning (Thread starter):
The kits do not have antiepileptic drugs on domestic US flights. (can someone verify this? We've had some conversations about it on the board.)

Not sure about U.S. domestic flights, but the story I just told happened on a Swiss flight LIS-ZRH and there were no antiepilectic drugs onboard.



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineManu From Canada, joined Dec 2004, 406 posts, RR: 7
Reply 22, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10563 times:



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 4):
NWA said that 96% of its flights have a medical professional

I would like to understand this statistic--it seems way too high. Maybe someone with first aid training. If you look at the number of doctors, nurses and EMTs in North America and then calculated the probability they'd be on any given flight I doubt it woudl be 96%. My guess would be more like 30%, but that's a pure guess and may not be any more right than the 96%. This

website says only 21% of people would be confident to perform CPR, even with 89% willing to help and 65% had received CPR training.

http://americanheart.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=429

Quoting Moose135 (Reply 7):
it's probably going to be 20 minutes or more until you are on the ground and medical personnel can reach you.

And from there, they still need to get you into the hospital. The only advantage to having an incident on an aircraft is you can divert to a place relatively close to a major trauma centre more quickly than many places without one close by, like small towns. But once you're down, you still need to be transported further. The golden hour is the key--get to a trauma centre within an hour and your percentage of survival increases.

Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 12):
If I was ever in a situation where someone went into cardiac arrest I would only do CPR under the guidance of the 911 operator or if a family member or friend needed it.



Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 14):
It's called the "good Samaritan law" go look it up.



Quoting M11Stephen (Reply 15):
Yeah but I have no formal training

Cadet57, you should never attempt a medical procedure without understanding what you are doing. CPR isn't hard. If you don't know it, you should take the hour or two and get trained on basic CPR. Everyone should. I've been a First Aid/CPR instructor and used to lifeguard. I've saved lives. It is a humbling experience, knowing someone's life may have been different if you weren't there. I think everyone should at least get trained so when the opportunity comes they too can help.

The only thing you can get in trouble for with the good samaritan laws is leaving after starting something. Once you commit to help you must stay unless your own life is in danger.

Anyone with health care statistics? This map says 390 people per doctor in USA and 470 per Canadian doctor. What does that mean for an aircraft of about 100 seats? My probability math is dusty!
http://strangemaps.wordpress.com/200...-doctorspatients-map-of-the-world/


User currently offlineJetstar From United States of America, joined May 2003, 1661 posts, RR: 10
Reply 23, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10545 times:
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Quoting Haggis79 (Reply 18):
sorry for posting twice, but I've just seen this post now. My advice on this: go and have some first-aid training - not just for your work, but also to be able to help in an emergency situation when a family member or friend needs some urgent help. A course which teaches CPR and some basic applying of bandages does not take longer than one weekend and shouldn't be expensive, but it may enable you to save a life one day. Just a thought.

I totally agree with Haggis, everyone out there should get some first aid training, contact your local red cross, fire house or local hospitals to see if they run any courses, because you never know when and where it will happen.

I feel the 2 most things to learn, besides basic first aid is CPR and the Heimlich maneuver, which is used on someone chocking on food, which clears the airway passage.

I took the EMT course in the late 1970’s, when I was a volunteer in at the time Civil Defense, and even though I have never taken any refresher courses, I feel that I still remember enough to apply both procedures if needed.

Many years ago, the former Mayor of New York City, Ed Koch was eating in a restaurant and started to choke on food, it was someone nearby who knew the Heimlich maneuver who saved his life. If this person hadn’t helped him, by the time the paramedics got there he would have been dead.

In someone is choking on food or in cardiac arrest, it’s only a matter of minutes before permanent brain injury sets in, and not much longer when death occurs.

Without proper hands on training, even though you mean well, you can cause more damage than good if the person has passed out but is not in cardiac arrest because one of the first parts of CPR training is recognizing the signs of cardiac arrest. And if not properly trained you can possibly break a rib and puncture a lung.

So again I recommend getting basic first aid training, you never know whose life you can possibly save, it even might be a close family member

JetStar


User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (5 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 10407 times:



Quoting Jetstar (Reply 23):
I took the EMT course in the late 1970’s, when I was a volunteer in at the time Civil Defense, and even though I have never taken any refresher courses, I feel that I still remember enough to apply both procedures if needed.

Take a refresher. CPR has changed A LOT in the recent years. The breath to compression ratio has gone from 1:5 to 2:30. Now, the American Red Cross even says to do compressions only in cardiac situations.

""In 86 percent of the cases, we had a nurse, paramedic or a doctor on board who could assist in treating the patient," said Sand. "Another possibility would be a bonus program for physicians who voluntarily register as a physician on board in case there will be an emergency."

""This study, like the others that have been done, is actually pretty reassuring," said Andrus. "If there is an emergency, they are probably better off than they would be in a lot of other public spaces."

Here is some info I found. http://www.sharp.com/news/health/newsArticle.cfm?articleID=12705



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
25 FlyingDoc : There was an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association a few years ago about inflight medical emergencies. It said that 75% of US dom
26 Swf : Take a refresher. CPR has changed A LOT in the recent years. The breath to compression ratio has gone from 1:5 to 2:30. Now, the American Red Cross ev
27 Traindoc : I provided emergency care on CO 79, ZRH to EWR, on February 25th. A male passenger spiked a fever, dropped his blood pressure and became very lethargi
28 M11Stephen : Traindoc, thank God for people like you. I can only imagine how the situation would have ended up had you not been there. Besides first aid, I know no
29 Zkpilot : Well if you consider that doctors are usually in the upper half of incomes and likewise can afford to fly on a regular basis, and that the bottom 1/3
30 Kevindca : I have been a flight attendant for 18 years. Thankfully, I can count the number of medical emergencies I have had onboard on both fingers and toes, ab
31 EWRCabincrew : If it were only that easy. I have had medical emergencies with no medical help, whatsoever. We do, however, use MedLink. When they are called, they a
32 DocLightning : That won't work at all. I've done CPR enough times to know that. Maybe if you could drag the patient to the entryway... Which is going to be a bit so
33 DocLightning : First of all, a benzodiazepine like lorazepam (ATIVAN) or diazepam (VALIUM) will stop a seizure, even at the level of the EEG (brain waves). However,
34 Bralo20 : Isn't this terrible? That people are affraid for being sued if they do something wrong? Actually this makes me very sad... Fortunately I don't live i
35 Terminalc : I've literally been on a few hundred TPAC flights with a lot of requests for a physician during flight. There have always been multiple physicians or
36 LVTMB : Exaaactly!. Thank you. I could not have said that better myself. So, to the thread starter's question about anticonvulsants, you don't really want th
37 INNflyer : As an Anesthesiologist and EMS physician, I have helped out over the years on several medical emergencies. Most of them were minor medical problems, b
38 LVTMB : Man .... that was a flying hospital! MB
39 Bralo20 : Same thing here in Belgium... You can't be sued if something goes wrong since you did the best you could do. Au contrary you can indeed be sued if yo
40 Jetstar : That sounds like an excellent idea. The airlines should have someway of determining if a passenger is a medical professional capable of administratin
41 DocLightning : I carry a copy of my medical license.
42 Alitis : I'll add my 2 cents here. Long story short, my wife and I were on OA 411 (747)from ATH to JFK a few years back when a call was made on the PA for a ph
43 BeyondBristol : Just to throw in a few points, although it seems there are enough senior medical staff on this board to deal with the medical questions!! Exactly. Unl
44 UA777lover : I was on a United flight from SFO-ORD and was seated in business class. I'm an ER nurse and am trained in CPR and many other things. There was a passe
45 Bralo20 : AFAIK the laws of the country where the aircraft / operator is registered apply... A few weeks ago a child was born on a Delta flight from Brussels a
46 413x3 : Just because a "doctor" is on board doesn't mean that they are able to provide assistance. I work with medical doctors who have been doing genetic res
47 Pyrex : Not exactly sure on the details. From what he told me, the patient was having multiple, frequent seizures, and refused the treatment in between seizu
48 413x3 : In such a situation is a patient consious enough to be able to make a decision on what's best for them? I find that type of thinking and any court tha
49 Luvfa : Whenever we have an onboard emergency our first step is to call for medical assistance as well as call the cockpit. The medical person can be MD, DO,
50 AF340 : From my (limited) use of them, they seems to be very "smart" machines. To answer your question, most of them do diagnose arrhythmias. Although I'm no
51 M11Stephen : What do you do if there are no medical personnel on board and someone needs an IV? If its a life or death situation, and under the guidance of a doct
52 Zkpilot : Most onboard med kits don't have that kind of equipment. Med kits tend to be made up of medication that can be administered by injection or orally. T
53 DocLightning : Actually, vets are pretty good. Unlike MD's, they are specialists in multiple species. Most vets specialize in mammals (dogs, cats, horses), which ar
54 DocLightning : You DO want to stop a seizure! You ABSOLUTELY want to stop a seizure!!! Serious brain damage can ensue if one goes on for longer than 30 minutes. The
55 Flymia : If the person is not concious you are allowed to treat them under the good samaritain law. It is in good faith. You can not be crimnally charged or s
56 DocLightning : Yup. That is correct. Unless the patient is wearing a bracelet or something that says "DNR," the consent is implied.
57 Lucky727 : In my CPR training (I'm a fire warden on my floor here at work) with St. John Ambulance, the training body for volunteers like me, taught us to obtai
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