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Operating Air-Bridges  
User currently offline767ER From Australia, joined Apr 2001, 1092 posts, RR: 4
Posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 5875 times:

I have always been curious as to who operates air-bridges at airports. I realise they are operated by airline staff but do they need do they have to be 'qualified' to do so, or can anyone operate them? Are they difficult to operate and how an earth do they manage to line them up so accurately. I fly out of SYD fairly often and I have noticed at the control panel on the base of the air bridge there are indicators saying what a/c type ie: 763 for a 767 -- 300.

I imagine there is a lot of safety training as the operator always has the potential to accidentally slip/fall off the bridge from the time the air bridge is pulled back from the aircraft to the air-bridge doors being closed.


Aircraft flown:F27,Viscount. EMB120, SAAB340, ATR70, 737-200.737-300,DC8, DC10,747-100,747-200,747-300,747-400, A320, A3
25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21507 posts, RR: 60
Reply 1, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 5859 times:



Quoting 767ER (Thread starter):
I realise they are operated by airline staff but do they need do they have to be 'qualified' to do so, or can anyone operate them?

Sometimes I wonder. I've been on planes for 10 minutes while the operator tried to figure out how to get the bridge lined up with a 767 door at ATL. This has happened twice in the last 2 years.

Quoting 767ER (Thread starter):
I imagine there is a lot of safety training as the operator always has the potential to accidentally slip/fall off the bridge from the time the air bridge is pulled back from the aircraft to the air-bridge doors being closed.

The operator stands behind a control panel, behind a window on most designs, so the chances of falling off the edge are pretty slim. There is also often a chain/rope across the opening that stays in place while the jetway is not up against the aircraft, but I've seen plenty of times where the operator didn't bother with this.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineKingAir200 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1611 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 5840 times:



Quoting 767ER (Thread starter):
I have always been curious as to who operates air-bridges at airports. I realise they are operated by airline staff but do they need do they have to be 'qualified' to do so, or can anyone operate them?

At my company, there's a computer based training course and some on the job training that you have to do before you can drive them.

Quoting 767ER (Thread starter):
Are they difficult to operate and how an earth do they manage to line them up so accurately.

Not particularly, but like a lot of things, it takes experience to be good at it. A lot of airplanes have lines on the fuselage that help with the lining up process.



Hey Swifty
User currently offlineShamrock321 From Ireland, joined May 2008, 1597 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 5774 times:

Here in DUB or certain companies dispatchers operate them and for others gate staff operate them, there is alot of traing involved and a practical exam to prove you can do it.

Also our staff ID's give access to certain areas etc, ours are smart so the doors recognise certain people you swipe and enter your pin, the airbridges work in a simliar way, you swiape and enter your pin, only those people who have passed the test can operate them, for example Im not trained to operate them so if I swipe it will say access denied.


User currently offlineLHR777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5734 times:



Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 1):
Sometimes I wonder. I've been on planes for 10 minutes while the operator tried to figure out how to get the bridge lined up with a 767 door at ATL. This has happened twice in the last 2 years.

This is often a problem when an aircraft 'stops short' or goes beyond the stop-line for that aircraft type. The jet-bridge is only so long, and can go out of limits, which then shuts it down and it needs to be reset, usually by airport engineering.

Quoting 767ER (Thread starter):
Are they difficult to operate and how an earth do they manage to line them up so accurately.

Not difficult in theory, but they can be temperamental, and operate at different speeds, angles etc from one bridge to the next. Some also have an override button that you need to press when you're very close to the aircraft. It doesn't always work and the jet-bridge can literally bounce off the aircraft, creating a sizable gap between jet-bridge head and fuselage.


User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5634 times:

When I worked for Continental Airlines at IAH, I operated the jetbridge (or jetway as we call them in the US) hundreds of times. I received about 15 minutes of training and a little card for my wallet.

All of the gate agents operated the jetways. As Continental was at that time was not unionized, agents were required to operate them. On some airlines, the union contract required ramp workers to operate jetways.

There is nothing even remotely difficult about operating them. You move the jetway forward to and back from the door, to the right or left, and up and down. There was a little joystick for forward, back, right and left. There were two buttons for up and down. There also were buttons to lower and raise the canopy. After doing it a few times, the gate agents got very good at raising/lowering and moving the jetway forward/back and right/left all at the same time using both hands on the joystick and buttons.

The only caveat about operating the jetway is that the flight attendent must open the door. If the agent uses the outside handle to open the door, you run the risk of engaging the slide. I would usually knock on the door if the F/A was slow, but as the F/A jumpseat is near the door, the F/A are usually very quick to open the door.

Quoting LHR777 (Reply 4):
This is often a problem when an aircraft 'stops short' or goes beyond the stop-line for that aircraft type. The jet-bridge is only so long, and can go out of limits, which then shuts it down and it needs to be reset, usually by airport engineering.

This was not usually a problem. If the ramp guys and pilot did not park the aircraft on its mark and you could not get the jetway in place, you called the operations desk and told them they would have to hook up a tug and move the aircraft manually to the right place. This was OK with the gate agents as the ramp agents then took the delay. You would note what happend in your trip report.


User currently offline44k From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5510 times:

At AA gate agents operate jetbridges. i do it all the time and did receive "on the job" training after I was hired. Fleet service clerks do not operate them and are even contractually forbidden to touch them.

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 5):
There is nothing even remotely difficult about operating them.

Depends what kind of jetbridge/siuation it is. There are many models and some are much more difficult to operate than others.

Also, at my airport (CMH) i have to "swing" the jetbridge sometimes from A to B line, as there are two aircraft parallel parked on the stand at the same time. It takes quite some skill to maneuver around one aircraft and mate the jetbridge to another, especially going backwards.

I know plenty of colleagues who struggle with them on a daily basis, while it isn't an issue for me. It's like driving, some are just better at it as others.


User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 5400 times:



Quoting 44k (Reply 6):
Depends what kind of jetbridge/siuation it is. There are many models and some are much more difficult to operate than others.

I only know the ones I operated for Continental in Houston. They were all quite easy to operate.

At the time (pre-2nd-bankruptcy) we had a lot of young people making $6.50 per hour operating the jetways and working gates. None of the had any problems.

I was not exaggerating when I said hundreds of times. I usually worked 5-6 flights per day, 5-days per week, for two years. Each flight requiring putting on and taking off a jetway.

I calculate that I operated a jetway 2500 times in my career as a gate agent. We had had about 35 gates at the time each with a gate agent and two shifts. I rarely heard of anybody having trouble operating them.


User currently offlineSmi0006 From Australia, joined Jan 2008, 1531 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days ago) and read 5373 times:

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 1):
The operator stands behind a control panel, behind a window on most designs, so the chances of falling off the edge are pretty slim. There is also often a chain/rope across the opening that stays in place while the jetway is not up against the aircraft, but I've seen plenty of times where the operator didn't bother with this.

In MEL the bridge won't move unless the strap and shoe are in place in its holder (the shoe is a sensor that slides under the door, as the aircraft are loaded and unloaded the rise and lower on their suspension this drops the bridge down so that it doesn't rip the door off as the aircraft get heavy.)
The door two bridge gate 11 at MEL is a right pain in the arse goes all over the shop as it gets close, the others are generally ok, simply and easy open book test to drive them.

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 5):
The only caveat about operating the jetway is that the flight attendent must open the door. If the agent uses the outside handle to open the door, you run the risk of engaging the slide.

Depends on the airline at QF it is strictly forbidden that crew open the doors on any aircraft (except the dash-8s and the 737 where they must be 'cracked') unless there is an emergency. If you open the door from the outside it will disarm the slide, this is in place to protect ground-staff. I believe at UA the ground-staff open the doors as well.
For me at my airline the crew do open the doors however I always feel uneasy, I worry that after a long flight one of the crew is tired or gets distracted and opens the door armed on me!!!I I suspect kill the both of us.

I Believe this happend at IB not so long ago killed the ground-staff a hostie and took out a toilet block, there is alot of force behind them...

[Edited 2009-03-22 20:56:56]

User currently onlineCush From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 235 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 5 months 4 days ago) and read 5321 times:

The air bridges don't require any special training or qualifications. I learned how to use it in about 15 minutes and have been doing it ever since. The only 2 things you need to watch out for are the sensative instruments sticking out of the front of the plane and also to leave 1-3 inches between the jetway and aircraft skin. Anyone with common sense and patience can learn it in no time flat.


Fly me to the moon let me play among the stars.
User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5263 times:



Quoting Smi0006 (Reply 8):
In MEL the bridge won't move unless the strap and shoe are in place in its holder (the shoe is a sensor that slides under the door, as the aircraft are loaded and unloaded the rise and lower on their suspension this drops the bridge down so that it doesn't rip the door off as the aircraft get heavy.)

Our jetways had a little rubber wheel that was in contact with the fuselage and adjusted the jetway up and down. Occasionally, it did not work properly and a flight attendant would come up to the gate frantic and say the door was about to be ripped off. But this was rare.

Quoting Smi0006 (Reply 8):
Depends on the airline at QF it is strictly forbidden that crew open the doors on any aircraft (except the dash-8s and the 737 where they must be 'cracked') unless there is an emergency.

We did not have many widebodies where the door slid electrically up into the ceiling. Most of our aircraft were narrow bodies (principally MD80s and 737s) where the slide was at the foot of the door and armed after closing. The flight attendants did not swing the door out (I did that), but they did have to open them for us.


User currently offlineNwaesc From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 3385 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5234 times:



Quoting KingAir200 (Reply 2):
At my company, there's a computer based training course and some on the job training that you have to do before you can drive them.

Really? Is that new? All I ever had was OJT...

Quoting KingAir200 (Reply 2):
Not particularly, but like a lot of things, it takes experience to be good at it. A lot of airplanes have lines on the fuselage that help with the lining up process.

Most do. Aside from that, if you have good hand/eye coordination, you're 99% of the way home.

On the ramp, we operate the jetways when towing in a plane. otherwise the agents usually do it.

For me the trickiest part is "readjusting" the jet bridge (eg. An A320 had been there last, and now we're bringing in a DC9).

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 5):
You move the jetway forward to and back from the door, to the right or left, and up and down. There was a little joystick for forward, back, right and left. There were two buttons for up and down. There also were buttons to lower and raise the canopy. After doing it a few times, the gate agents got very good at raising/lowering and moving the jetway forward/back and right/left all at the same time using both hands on the joystick and buttons.

We also have ones where "drive left" and "drive right" are buttons. Actually, now that I think about it, we have a different type of operating controls at each of our gates...

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 5):
The only caveat about operating the jetway is that the flight attendent must open the door.

At my company, the agent *always* opens the door from the outside. You give a little knock, and the F/A gives a thumbs up through the window confirming that the door's disarmed.

Quoting 44k (Reply 6):
Fleet service clerks do not operate them and are even contractually forbidden to touch them.

Wow!

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 10):
Our jetways had a little rubber wheel that was in contact with the fuselage and adjusted the jetway up and down.

The autoleveler...

In one of our outsourced cities, someone thought it'd be fun to spin that wheel (you know, even though it says "do no touch" on it?), and destroyed the door on an A320...



"Nothing ever happens here, " I said. "I just wait."
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21507 posts, RR: 60
Reply 12, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 5178 times:



Quoting LHR777 (Reply 4):
This is often a problem when an aircraft 'stops short' or goes beyond the stop-line for that aircraft type. The jet-bridge is only so long, and can go out of limits, which then shuts it down and it needs to be reset, usually by airport engineering.

This was not the case though. It wasn't a matter of the jet-bridge going out limits, it was the driver going left, going right, going up going down, while we all waited, and the F/As laughed at the incompetence while waiting to let us all off.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineBWE320 From Germany, joined Aug 2007, 88 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 5055 times:



Quoting 767ER (Thread starter):
I realise they are operated by airline staff

At FRA the air bridges are operated by FRAPORT staff only. They are driving from one air bridge to the next on little bicycles and they wear always suit and tie.


User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12241 posts, RR: 35
Reply 14, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 5001 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR



Quoting Nwaesc (Reply 11):

We also have ones where "drive left" and "drive right" are buttons. Actually, now that I think about it, we have a different type of operating controls at each of our gates...

We have two different kinds in our area, however, two gates are notorious for being "difficult" due to the design angle, versus the angle the plane is actually lined up with the line these days

Quoting Nwaesc (Reply 11):
In one of our outsourced cities, someone thought it'd be fun to spin that wheel (you know, even though it says "do no touch" on it?), and destroyed the door on an A320...

Oops  Silly Sounds like a smart thing to do



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineLHR777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 4941 times:



Quoting Eghansen (Reply 5):
The only caveat about operating the jetway is that the flight attendent must open the door. If the agent uses the outside handle to open the door, you run the risk of engaging the slide. I would usually knock on the door if the F/A was slow, but as the F/A jumpseat is near the door, the F/A are usually very quick to open the door.

You must have worked at CO a long time ago. Our company policy at CO is that aircraft doors are ALWAYS opened by the agent, from OUTSIDE the aircraft.

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 12):
This was not the case though. It wasn't a matter of the jet-bridge going out limits, it was the driver going left, going right, going up going down, while we all waited, and the F/As laughed at the incompetence while waiting to let us all off.

With all due respect, you wouldn't know that, if you're inside the aircraft. Some jet-bridges are just really temperamental. I've used some where you push the joystick right and the bridge moves forwards, or you turn left and the wheels rotate to the right. They're not all as easy to use as some people seem to think!


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3999 posts, RR: 34
Reply 16, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 4904 times:



Quoting LHR777 (Reply 15):
Some jet-bridges are just really temperamental.

Don't you notice that as airbridges become more sophisticated, they go wrong more often.
All our old bridges are simple. Even aircraft technicians and cleaners have approval to operate them. But the newest bridges are computor controlled, and drive themselves out to the aircraft. Now at last after two years of delays while the ramp went to get steps, they have fitted manual overrides in them so the ramp agent can drive them manually. I don't touch them!

Quoting BWE320 (Reply 13):
At FRA the air bridges are operated by FRAPORT staff only

Thats maybe a good idea. We have to remove the jetties from the aircraft at night. This means that if the cleaners and technicians do not have approval for the operation, then a ramp agent must hang around and wait until we've finished.
Bet those FRAport guys are busy at 0600, racing around putting all the jetties back on!!


User currently offlineFlyboy1108 From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 94 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 4790 times:



Quoting Nwaesc (Reply 11):
Really? Is that new? All I ever had was OJT...

Hahaha in that case you have one step up on me:

Day 1: Boss: "Congrats! Here's your employment offer for Ramp Agent" Me: "Yippee!"
Day 2: Boss: "Here's a test and the answers for our jetbridge operating procedures. You'll never have to do it but we're all required to take it. Don't bother reading the packet, just fill out the test." Me: "Uh, okay?"
Day 3: (Boss has day off) Lead CSR: "Nick the plane's been on the ground for 15 minutes and we need someone who is qualified to operate the jetbridge and you are the only one here who has taken the test." Me: "I've NEVER DONE IT BEFORE" Lead CSR: "Well looks like you're going to learn now doesn't it?"

Nothing like being thrown into the fire, right? Let's just say once I got it turned on without the auto-level alarm going off there would have been a hole in the side of the airplane if it didn't have an automatic stop mechanism on it. Ah, good times, Hahaha


NCB
ABE



"God is great, beer is good, and people are crazy"
User currently offlineScottishLaddie From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 2384 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 4631 times:

It's interesting to hear how every place is different. At EDI it's the dispatchers employed by the handling agents who operate them, and need trained on them to a certain level before being issued with a license from the airport authority. They take a bit of getting used to but like anything when you're operating them everyday it becomes second nature. But don't think anyone would admit to enjoying putting them on B737 classics.  Wink

User currently offlineKingAir200 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1611 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4542 times:



Quoting Nwaesc (Reply 11):
Really? Is that new? All I ever had was OJT...

There's a course in LMS for it. I don't remember anything from it, so it couldn't have been particularly informative.

Quoting Nwaesc (Reply 11):
Actually, now that I think about it, we have a different type of operating controls at each of our gates...

Us too. One of ours is North Central vintage.



Hey Swifty
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21507 posts, RR: 60
Reply 20, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4527 times:



Quoting LHR777 (Reply 15):
With all due respect, you wouldn't know that, if you're inside the aircraft. Some jet-bridges are just really temperamental.

With all due respect, the F/As on DL know ATL pretty well, and know what SHOULD happen. So when it doesn't and it takes 10 minutes, and they comment on it, am I supposed to believe that it is just a "temperamental" jetway or at least some level of incompetence?

It's like saying that watching a bad parallel parker screw up over and over is not their fault, because some cars are harder to park than others. It doesn't really matter, because the vehicle is a given, and the driver should be able to master their vehicle over time. Same for a jetway. If the jetways in ATL are hard to use, then it takes extra training. But in most cases I've landed there, somehow the operator got the jetway up to the door without issue.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineRevo1059 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 132 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (5 years 5 months 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3250 times:



Quote:
With all due respect, the F/As on DL know ATL pretty well, and know what SHOULD happen. So when it doesn't and it takes 10 minutes, and they comment on it, am I supposed to believe that it is just a "temperamental" jetway or at least some level of incompetence?

I consider myself damn good at positioning a jetway. The ones at ORD T5 were real fun when trying to get down to an MD80 or trying to avoid the pitot tubes on a 737. YES there are times when the jetway has an issue. We had a few at ORD that were very touchy, then all it takes is the A/C to park short or long or even off center and that throws more wrenches into the mix.

Considering F/A's don't touch jetway controls ever I wouldn't consider them the #1 source on how jetway positioning should be done (with all due respect)

and yes, I'm sure there is the occasional turd who can't get it right, just like in any other profession.


User currently offlineAirportGuy1971 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 355 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (5 years 5 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2273 times:



Quoting Nwaesc (Reply 11):
Quoting KingAir200 (Reply 2):
Not particularly, but like a lot of things, it takes experience to be good at it. A lot of airplanes have lines on the fuselage that help with the lining up process.


Most do. Aside from that, if you have good hand/eye coordination, you're 99% of the way home.

Look left and below the main aircraft door here. There is a perfect example of the marks described above. A corresponding single line on the jetway creates a lowercase "t" when properly aligned.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Chad Thomas - Jetwash Images



User currently offlineLHR777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (5 years 5 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2100 times:



Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 20):
With all due respect, the F/As on DL know ATL pretty well, and know what SHOULD happen. So when it doesn't and it takes 10 minutes, and they comment on it, am I supposed to believe that it is just a "temperamental" jetway or at least some level of incompetence?

...but F/A's also generally have never touched a jetway in their lives, so how would/should they know? With all due respect, of course.

I fly into LHR all the time - it doesn't mean that I therefore know that every jet-bridge works the same as every other jetway. They're mechanical objects, each with their own little 'quirks', and thus all different, to a certain extent.

What's to say it wasn't a new employee, AND a temperamental jetway?


User currently offlineTonystan From Ireland, joined Jan 2006, 1423 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (5 years 5 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2094 times:



Quoting Shamrock321 (Reply 3):
Here in DUB or certain companies dispatchers operate them and for others gate staff operate them, there is alot of traing involved and a practical exam to prove you can do it.

Really? lol!
I worked on the ground for EI and even as a low grade we were all trained on Air Bridges if we worked in Boarding. Training lasted about an hour and we were simply shown how to manouver the jetty. It really is not that hard at all, if its the type with a joystick its literally point where you want it to go and away it goes. However we did have one very old jetty at B22 Not sure if it is still there) which had a "wand" with a wheel on which you used to set the wheels in motion, on the wand below the wheels were two buttons, one to turn it to the left and the other to the right...it was also on a big chord so you could literally drive the thing from the bottom of the steps of the jetty if you wanted to!



My views are my own and do not reflect any other person or organisation.
User currently offlineFlaps From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 1266 posts, RR: 4
Reply 25, posted (5 years 5 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1974 times:



Quoting LHR777 (Reply 23):
...but F/A's also generally have never touched a jetway in their lives, so how would/should they know? With all due respect, of course.

I fly into LHR all the time - it doesn't mean that I therefore know that every jet-bridge works the same as every other jetway. They're mechanical objects, each with their own little 'quirks', and thus all different, to a certain extent.

What's to say it wasn't a new employee, AND a temperamental jetway?

LHR777

That was a well worded response. I was trying to respond to the same thing in the same way but was unable to come up diplomatically acceptable wording.


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