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Pilot Seniority Fiasco: Father Is Below Son At AC!  
User currently offlineWatewate From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 2284 posts, RR: 1
Posted (13 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1295 times:

Yes, you read the subject line correct.


Open feud erupts among merged Air Canada pilots
Former Canadian Airlines crew cry discrimination
John Spears
BUSINESS REPORTER

A feud between Air Canada pilots and pilots from the former Canadian Airlines has erupted following an arbitrator's ruling on seniority.

Angry words - even pushing and shoving in airport corridors - have erupted following the ruling, which Canadian Airlines pilots say puts them far down the newly merged seniority list.

``Hostilities have broken out,'' said Don Paxton, who heads the Air Line Pilots Association, representing the former Canadian Airlines pilots.

He said Air Canada staff have been gloating over the decision.

On a Winnipeg-Toronto flight Monday, a flight attendant announced the decision to passengers and hailed it as a ``big win over the Canadian pilots,'' he said.

``It's not a pleasant environment.''

Paxton said pilots making up to $180,000 a year could be bumped to the rank of first officer, at 60 per cent of their former pay scale.

But Don Johnson, president of the Air Canada Pilots Association, said that's not likely to happen.

He said he doesn't understand the animosity being directed against Air Canada pilots following the decision of arbitrator Morton Mitchnik, who drew up a formula to determine seniority.

``If they have a beef, it's with Mr. Mitchnik,'' Johnson said.

Paxton said the seniority formula means there are three senior Air Canada pilots near the top of the list for every senior Canadian pilot.

The bottom 442 names are nearly all Canadian pilots, he said.

When Air Canada took over Canadian last summer, Air Canada had 2,180 pilots and Canadian had 1,258.

Paxton said the Air Canada bias is so severe that one senior Canadian pilot is ranked below his son, who flies for Air Canada.

His association will seek a judicial review of the arbitrator's award, arguing that statements by Air Canada president Robert Milton interfered with the decision.

Seniority issues could come to a head when Canadian and Air Canada crews are intermingled and assigned to the same aircraft.

Paxton said that could happen as early as June. He's currently flying Boeing 767s but said he figures he'll end up flying the smaller, older Boeing 737s because of the bias.

Air Canada's Laura Cooke said the airline is still working on how to intermingle the crews and reassign aircraft.

Johnson said Mitchnik's decision is fair and recognizes the fact that it was Canadian Airlines, not Air Canada, that was on the brink of failure last summer.

He also said that 300 pilots have been hired since the takeover, all of whom are junior to the Canadian pilots.

Air Canada has pledged that there will be no forced layoffs or relocations resulting from the merger prior to March, 2002.


3 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMarrty From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (13 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1249 times:

It's obvious that the former Canadian pilots need to grow up. They need to be reminded and be thankful that they have a more secure job with higher pay than they did two years ago. The reason for the son being ahead of his father is because Canadian's hiring has been much slower over the last several years compared to Air Canada's.

Let's not forget that Canadian was on the brink of bankruptcy, and the government made it clear they weren't going to continue to bail Canadian out of their financial jams.

Pushing and shoving? They should publish the names of those involved, as passengers wouldn't want to fly on an aircraft piloted by those who resort to juvenile school yard behaviour.




User currently offlineDeltaSFO From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2488 posts, RR: 22
Reply 2, posted (13 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 1217 times:

It's obvious that the former Canadian pilots need to grow up. They need to be reminded and be thankful that they have a more secure job with higher pay than they did two years ago. The reason for the son being ahead of his father is because Canadian's hiring has been much slower over the last several years compared to Air Canada's.

Let's not forget that Canadian was on the brink of bankruptcy, and the government made it clear they weren't going to continue to bail Canadian out of their financial jams.

Pushing and shoving? They should publish the names of those involved, as passengers wouldn't want to fly on an aircraft piloted by those who resort to juvenile school yard behaviour.


Try reading the article again.

I've met enough ex-Western pilots in my life to know exactly why the ex-CP guys are so pissed off.

DeltaSFO
former Air Canada employee



It's a new day. Every moment matters. Now, more than ever.
User currently offlineMarrty From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1195 times:

Not exactly comparing apples to apples...

What do the ex-Western pilots have to do with anything? This is 2001, and involves the largest airline in Canada. I know first hand the details of the Cdn/AC seniority woes, and I will say again - the former Canadian pilots need to wake up, and be thankful of where they are now compared to where they were two years ago.

For years, many Canadian pilots have been reluctant to buy new homes or cars, because they didn't feel they had job security with their employer. Now they have security, with the exception of those who have been hired within the last few years. Sounds like a fairly fruitful situation to me. These are the employees that endured cuts and invested their earnings in the company - I could go on. I think now they are being rewarded from a monetary standpoint for toughing it out - enough whining about seniority. They have exceptionally well paying jobs, and can now begin to plan their futures!

These guys should take a look at the charter pilots in Canada who get paid much less, yet are many times more professional than those who are pushing and shoving in the corridor. When C3 and Royal merge their lists, something tells me they will adopt a team approach and move forward.

DeltaSFO, I respect the fact that we are all entitled to our own opinions. However, let's be more realistic.

And that is only my opinion.



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