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YQY Says No To Sunwing Flights...  
User currently offlineCB97 From Canada, joined Mar 2008, 90 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 3550 times:

Apparently the airport authority in Sydney, Nova Scotia, has told Sunwing they won't allow them to operate their seasonal service to Toronto this summer...

CBC story
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia.../2009/04/16/ns-sydney-sunwing.html

Chronicle Herald story
http://thechronicleherald.ca/NovaScotia/1117010.html

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineYWG From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 1146 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 3546 times:

Well if that isn't protectionism (of AC), then I don't know what is!!


Contact Winnipeg center now on 134.4, good day.
User currently offlineGte439u From Canada, joined Nov 2003, 361 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3368 times:

Does an airport operator in Canada have the legal right to refuse an airline the ability to operate a certain route on the grounds that the market is insufficient in size? I thought that, south of the 55th parallel, air transport in Canada was deregulated, and any Canadian carrier could enter and exit any market at will.

User currently offlineHeathrow From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2005, 979 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3348 times:

Great! I love only having a choice of AC and WS  Yeah sure

If the U.S. can have CO, DL, AA, UA, US, B6, WN, and many more, i don't see how WG is going to cause a massive imbalance. Besides, no one said no to SG or Z4....


User currently offlineMAH4546 From Sweden, joined Jan 2001, 32899 posts, RR: 71
Reply 4, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3334 times:



Quoting Gte439u (Reply 2):
Does an airport operator in Canada have the legal right to refuse an airline the ability to operate a certain route on the grounds that the market is insufficient in size? I thought that, south of the 55th parallel, air transport in Canada was deregulated, and any Canadian carrier could enter and exit any market at will.

In the United States, privately run airports which recieve no federal funding have this right. The only airport in the U.S. that I know of which works this way is Branson, Missouri - 100% privately owned and operated, and it has given AirTran a monopoly on the Atlanta route.

Not sure if that is how it works in Canada.



a.
User currently offlineGhYHZ From Canada, joined Feb 2008, 263 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3271 times:



Quoting YWG (Reply 1):
Well if that isn't protectionism (of AC), then I don't know what is!!

And it’s not that long ago it was Air Canada YQY had in their gunsights.

In 2005 Air Canada Jazz wanted to down-gauge a couple of the five daily Dash-8 flights to YHZ to Air Georgian operated Beech 1900s. YQY Airport Authorities approach.......we’ll just ban Air Georgian from flying here!


User currently offlineGte439u From Canada, joined Nov 2003, 361 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3237 times:



Quoting MAH4546 (Reply 4):
In the United States, privately run airports which recieve no federal funding have this right. The only airport in the U.S. that I know of which works this way is Branson, Missouri - 100% privately owned and operated, and it has given AirTran a monopoly on the Atlanta route.

Not sure if that is how it works in Canada.

Airports in Canada are generally owned by Transport Canada, a federal agency. Since the 1990s, Transport Canada has leased operations and terminal facilities of the airports to local airport authorities.

It surprises me that a local airport authority would be able to engage in anti-competitive behaviour that clearly favours one carrier airport user over another.


User currently offlineMultimark From Canada, joined Jul 2006, 796 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3163 times:



Quoting Gte439u (Reply 6):
It surprises me that a local airport authority would be able to engage in anti-competitive behaviour that clearly favours one carrier airport user over another

The airport's making a prudent decision. Its long been apparent that Canada can only sustain two national airlines. Why let Sunwing step in on a seasonal basis and jeopardize the two year-round carriers (and hence the airport's long-term revenue)? Sydney's only got a population of @25,000.


User currently offlineCB97 From Canada, joined Mar 2008, 90 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 3007 times:

WestJet only flies seasonally to YQY according to their route map. Maybe this is a little incentive to get them to start year-round service?

User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16285 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2943 times:



Quoting Gte439u (Reply 2):
Does an airport operator in Canada have the legal right to refuse an airline the ability to operate a certain route on the grounds that the market is insufficient in size?

It would appear to be the case.

Blatant favouritism (whether intentional or not) not to mention uncompetitive behaviour. This story is bewildering.



Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5003 posts, RR: 43
Reply 10, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2822 times:



Quoting Yyz717 (Reply 9):
This story is bewildering.

I agree. YQY airport has had a very long history of harassing its tenants. One that sticks out is as mentioned .... threatening to bar the use of B1900s for YHZ-YQY flights unless AC places DHC-8s instead!!!

When AC announced the YYZ-YQY-YYZ flight with the CL-65, YQY airport announced that they thought the scheduled times were inconvenient and unless AC rescheduled them, they "may not" allow them to land! I guess AC told them to take it or leave it, as the times have not changed. But in reality, the late into YQY and early out of YQY are best for connections.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineSkywatcher From Canada, joined Sep 2002, 460 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2721 times:

I believe the Sydney metro population is a bit above 100,000 (and dropping steadily but surely over the last 50 years).

It's amazing that the most economically disadvantaged area in Canada (Cape Breton Island) has bureacrats that behave this way. Is this atittude representative of local atittudes? Is this the type of thinking that is contributing to the economic disaster in Cape Breton?


User currently offlineGte439u From Canada, joined Nov 2003, 361 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (5 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 2684 times:



Quoting Multimark (Reply 7):
The airport's making a prudent decision. Its long been apparent that Canada can only sustain two national airlines. Why let Sunwing step in on a seasonal basis and jeopardize the two year-round carriers (and hence the airport's long-term revenue)? Sydney's only got a population of @25,000.

I would probably agree with you in regards to the market size. However, the issue here is whether or not it is in the power of a Canadian airport authority to refuse to do business with an airline approved by the Canada Transportation Agency.

Quoting Yyz717 (Reply 9):
Quoting Gte439u (Reply 2):
Does an airport operator in Canada have the legal right to refuse an airline the ability to operate a certain route on the grounds that the market is insufficient in size?

It would appear to be the case.

Blatant favouritism (whether intentional or not) not to mention uncompetitive behaviour. This story is bewildering.

I'm sure that Sunwing has a few good lawyers on retainer. While the airport authority *may* have the power to refuse a carrier landing slots, I question if 'insufficient market size' is a permissible ground on which to make such a refusal.


(I am still researching this problem even though only the competition aspects are related to my thesis topic; airlines are more fun than gold mines! One of the joys of graduate studies in law is having an academic law library my disposal 24/7.)


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