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Missing Autistic Teen Found In California  
User currently offlineDUALRATED From United States of America, joined May 2008, 1001 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 3 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 2887 times:

A cute story about a young aspiring aviation buff. I had no idea this could even happen.


http://www.cbs12.com/news/kenton_4717335___article.html/car_boca.html


AIRLINERS.NET MODERATORS SUCK MOOSE DICK!!!!
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19412 posts, RR: 58
Reply 1, posted (5 years 3 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2791 times:

You call it "cute." I call it "frightening as hell." Those poor parents...

User currently offlineDUALRATED From United States of America, joined May 2008, 1001 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 3 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2775 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
You call it "cute."

I was being sarcastic.I forgot to add the " sarcastic " sorry.



AIRLINERS.NET MODERATORS SUCK MOOSE DICK!!!!
User currently offlineJbernie From Australia, joined Jan 2007, 880 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 3 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2756 times:

Sounds like this kid could have a job in Aviation Security soon.... will be interesting to see the details of how he managed to do it.

Almost like he managed to get beyond security (a big enough concern) and from then on everyone assumed he was supposed to be there and didn't double check, then maybe he got lucky with not many people flying so there were empty seats.


User currently offlineNASBWI From Bahamas, joined Feb 2005, 1308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2508 times:

If he flew from FLL, that's awfully fishy. Having been through that airport a number of times, the TSA there is pretty strict - and that's just with flight crew! How did a 13 yr old manage to purchase a ticket, go through security, and board a flight with few or no flags raised? (learning disabilities notwithstanding)


Fierce, Fabulous, and Flawless ;)
User currently offlineJmc1975 From Israel, joined Sep 2000, 3253 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2481 times:



Quoting Jbernie (Reply 3):

Almost like he managed to get beyond security (a big enough concern) and from then on everyone assumed he was supposed to be there and didn't double check,

Asperger's Syndrome can do wonders!  Smile



.......
User currently offlineLoneStarMike From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 3811 posts, RR: 34
Reply 6, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2472 times:

Here's another article. Apparently his airline of choice was WN.

I figured it had to be WN. Any other airline and he probably would have had to change planes somewhere, but WN has a two-stop direct flight from FLL to SJC.

So it seems he used a stolen credit card to purchase the ticket - most likely online. If he didn't have luggage, which he probably didn't, he could have gotten his boarding pass from the kiosk. But he still had to get through security without an ID, but maybe since he's a kid, he isn't required to have an ID.?

I know the article said he was 13, but he looks like he could be a year or two older. How does the TSA handle someone say 14 or 15 who might be considered old enough to fly alone (I.e. not an unaccompanied minor) but still too young to have a drivers license or other form of ID?

LoneStarMike


User currently offlineNASBWI From Bahamas, joined Feb 2005, 1308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2422 times:



Quoting LoneStarMike (Reply 6):
I know the article said he was 13, but he looks like he could be a year or two older. How does the TSA handle someone say 14 or 15 who might be considered old enough to fly alone (I.e. not an unaccompanied minor) but still too young to have a drivers license or other form of ID?

Everyone must have a valid form of ID. UM's have it, and it's usually in the form of a birth certificate - at least for domestic travel. They are also escorted through security by a crewmember and their parents/guardians - who has their ID. Meet and Assists have ID, and it's verified by the crewmember escorting them and presented to TSA (or the appropriate security official). And of course, adults have ID.



Fierce, Fabulous, and Flawless ;)
User currently offlineTheCommodore From Australia, joined Dec 2007, 2754 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2407 times:

Just goes to show you that NO level of security is 100%, in America or anywhere else for the matter.

Makes the "Security system" look pretty pathetic really. Heads should roll over this one.



Flown 905,468 kms or 2.356 times to the moon, 1296 hrs, Longest flight 10,524 kms
User currently offlineDesertFlyer From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 515 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2399 times:

My girlfriend (who looks young) has gotten through TSA security without any ID. They scold her, and send her through additional screening, but say since she looks under 18 she can get through. I just wish she wouldn't loose her ID so often... *sigh*

Still, that could explain how this kid made it through.


User currently offlineThePalauan From Guam, joined Oct 2006, 264 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2196 times:

The article mentions he used his REPORT CARD as his ID. Unless schools are sophisticated now and you have your picture on them, I find it really hard to comprehend any ticketing or TSA agent letting a person fly simply because they show marks from school and claim to be the person whose name is on the card.

 redflag  As interesting as this story is, the fact that the kid had no real form of ID and still flew means someone (or some people) screwed up big time!



You can take the boy out of the island, but not the island out of the boy!
User currently offlineLoneStarMike From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 3811 posts, RR: 34
Reply 11, posted (5 years 3 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2159 times:



Quoting NASBWI (Reply 7):
Quoting LoneStarMike (Reply 6):
I know the article said he was 13, but he looks like he could be a year or two older. How does the TSA handle someone say 14 or 15 who might be considered old enough to fly alone (I.e. not an unaccompanied minor) but still too young to have a drivers license or other form of ID?

Everyone must have a valid form of ID.

This is from a June, 2008 press release from TSA.gov:

Quote:
Beginning Saturday, June 21, 2008 passengers that willfully refuse to provide identification at security checkpoint will be denied access to the secure area of airports. This change will apply exclusively to individuals that simply refuse to provide any identification or assist transportation security officers in ascertaining their identity.

This new procedure will not affect passengers that may have misplaced, lost or otherwise do not have ID but are cooperative with officers. Cooperative passengers without ID may be subjected to additional screening protocols, including enhanced physical screening, enhanced carry-on and/or checked baggage screening, interviews with behavior detection or law enforcement officers and other measures.

According to WN's policy Children 12 and over do not have to travel as unaccompanied minors. If the child is traveling on a youth fare, then age verification is required. But at the bottom, it notes:

Quote:
If you are not traveling on a Youth, Child, Senior, or Infant Fare, you do not need to be age verified to request your boarding pass on southwest.com or at an E-Ticket Check-In kiosk

So how is this any different from an adult, who loses or forgets his/her ID but is cooperative with the screeners and is allowed to fly?

LoneStarMike


User currently offlineLoneStarMike From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 3811 posts, RR: 34
Reply 12, posted (5 years 2 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 1871 times:



Quoting ThePalauan (Reply 10):
As interesting as this story is, the fact that the kid had no real form of ID and still flew means someone (or some people) screwed up big time!

Update from the South Florida Sun-Sentinel

West Boca boy, 13, tells TV show audience of his solo trip to California

Quote:
Weaver said he used his report card as his identification to get through airport security. Air travelers younger than 21 don't have to show a picture ID. Officials said it was not against the policies of Southwest Airlines or Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport for a 13-year-old to travel by himself.

LoneStarMike


User currently offlineJcs17 From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 8065 posts, RR: 39
Reply 13, posted (5 years 2 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 1850 times:

As soon as I heard this story I had one thought: How long will it take for this kid to post a trip report?


America's chickens are coming home to rooooost!
User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (5 years 2 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 1835 times:



Quoting ThePalauan (Reply 10):
As interesting as this story is, the fact that the kid had no real form of ID and still flew means someone (or some people) screwed up big time!

Sorry, but I don't understand why everybody thinks something was wrong.

First of all, this is Southwest's policy on children traveling alone:

"Children under the age of five must be accompanied throughout their trip by a Customer twelve years of age or older."

"Children who are 12 years of age or older travel under the same policies and terms as adults."

So he was not in any violation of Southwest's rules.

As for the identification, it is true that a report card does not have a picture, but then neither does a birth certificate. I can't speak for all school districts, but the school district that I work for does include the birthdate on the report card. It is to guard against two children who have the same name (i.e. Juan Garcia) switching their report cards to get into college. Very few children age 12 to 15 have state issued picture ids.

As for TSA "screwing up", I don't see how they did. Their job is to prevent people on the no-fly list or with weapons to get onboard an aircraft. They probably assumed that the young men on question was not on the no-fly list (a fairly safe assumption) and they undoubtedly scanned him as usual to check for weapons.

The only thing he did which could be held against him was using his father's credit card, but I know of many parents who send their children to the store to buy things with their credit cards. It is not at all unusual.


User currently offlineThePalauan From Guam, joined Oct 2006, 264 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1608 times:



Quoting LoneStarMike (Reply 12):
Quote:
Weaver said he used his report card as his identification to get through airport security. Air travelers younger than 21 don't have to show a picture ID. Officials said it was not against the policies of Southwest Airlines or Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport for a 13-year-old to travel by himself.

I didn't know that. Thanks.

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 14):
As for TSA "screwing up", I don't see how they did. Their job is to prevent people on the no-fly list or with weapons to get onboard an aircraft. They probably assumed that the young men on question was not on the no-fly list (a fairly safe assumption) and they undoubtedly scanned him as usual to check for weapons.

I'll admit I've overreacted to the story somewhat. I'm just a bit surprised that with the number of changes in traveling rules in the past few years that the TSA would have this kind of exemption. My only concern would be regarding some kid using this loophole to run away from home. Buy the ticket under one name and then disappear using another. Heck, it could even happen with a kidnapping (even with security cameras). Well, hypothetically it could work that way, right?



You can take the boy out of the island, but not the island out of the boy!
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