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Cape Air Looking For Cessna 402 Replacement  
User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4537 posts, RR: 42
Posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 19631 times:

Just read on Flight that Cape Air are looking for a Cessna 402 replacement. They want something multi-engined, with equivalent capacity and costs.

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...ement-options-for-cessna-402s.html

There are a lot of these 9 seat twins out there that need replacing sooner or later (increasingly sooner). I'll be interested to see whether anyone can make a viable proposition out of it...

A few years ago, CASA in Australia produced an interesting report on the ongoing structural safety of these aircraft as they age, which can be downloaded at http://www.casa.gov.au/airworth/papers/littleairliners.pdf


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72 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21103 posts, RR: 56
Reply 1, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 19574 times:

I wonder who they're having conversations with, since I can't think of any new nine-seat multi-pistons that are out there at the moment.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineBomber996 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 390 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 19520 times:

When the Cape Air CEO came to the University of North Dakota for a conference I asked him this exact question. He said that their ideal replacement for a Cessna 402 is a Cessna 402 with turbine engines. Although this seems unlikely, he also said that if needed the 402's have another good 15-20 years in them before they absolutely need to be replaced.

Peace  box 



AVIATION - A Vacation In Any Town, I Own Nothing
User currently offlineNASBWI From Bahamas, joined Feb 2005, 1286 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 19451 times:

Hmmm...Cessna seems to have been pretty successful in rebuilding their C172/182/206 aircraft....how about rebuilding (and modifying) their highly successful C402 series? I'm sure they'd get a lot of interest from potential customers. Perhaps even expand on it and redesign the aircraft altogether.


Fierce, Fabulous, and Flawless ;)
User currently offline727forever From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 793 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 19447 times:



Quoting Bomber996 (Reply 2):
Although this seems unlikely, he also said that if needed the 402's have another good 15-20 years in them before they absolutely need to be replaced.

If you believe that I have some ocean front property that I have a good deal on for you.

The 402 is a great airplane but We're approaching 30 years since the last ones were built. They are tough though not as tough as a Douglas or Boeing yet fly many cycles and hours every day down in the bumps. I believe the 402C that Cape Air flies did not fall under the A.D. that the 402A/B did, but I would not be surprised to see wing A.D.s start popping up on them as well. It is time for a fresh design. I think that there is demand for this type of airplane world wide, but the cost is going to be such that I doubt you will see manufacturers jumping to build one because they know the operators needing them won't be able to afford an airplane that will cost between $1.5million and $2.5 million. So, could we see Cape Air go and find some old King Air 90's to fill the gap??

727forever



727forever
User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2951 posts, RR: 37
Reply 5, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 19431 times:
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If they insist on a twin the choices are limited.

However if they would consider singles as well, then the Caravan line and the PC-12 might come into play. Though the PC-12 is probably too much plane for Cape Air's routes.

Maybe consider a slightly larger replacement and get some of the new build Twin Otters?

A re-engined turbine powered 402 doesn't seem like an impossible option, though it would be a very overpowered aircraft IMHO... maybe just update the existing pistons to something slightly bigger but more efficient? The smallest turboprops I know of are the things like the TPF351 (waaaay too big) or adapted turboshaft designs (RR500 series). The latter might work though I'm not aware of any commercial uses of those engines.



Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
User currently offlineKPDX From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 2690 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 19420 times:

PC-12's would be nice!


View my aviation videos on Youtube by searching for zildjiandrummr12
User currently offlineCHRISBA777ER From UK - England, joined Mar 2001, 5964 posts, RR: 62
Reply 7, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 19361 times:

Lovely birds but getting on a bit now. Had loads and loads of flights on them and loved every one of them.

I'd say PC12s are the most likely but then I'm pretty sure a King Air version would do the job.



What do you mean you dont have any bourbon? Do you know how far it is to Houston? What kind of airline is this???
User currently offlineAdam42185 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 408 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 19343 times:



Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 5):
However if they would consider singles as well, then the Caravan line and the PC-12 might come into play. Though the PC-12 is probably too much plane for Cape Air's routes.

I was just thinking of the PC-12. I could definitely see them operating the PC-12 on their flights, or the caravan, I hadnt thought of that at first. Either or, the colors would look nice on them, I think.

What are the operating costs of a king air 90 vs PC-12 vs caravan? acquisition costs?
Would a king are 200 fit into the picture or is that too large?


User currently offlineA342 From Germany, joined Jul 2005, 4675 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 19308 times:

Very simple: The Reims-Cessna F406. It's basically a 404 Titan with PT6s:

http://www.reims-aviation-industries...x=1&page=1&sousmenu=0&setLangue=en



Exceptions confirm the rule.
User currently offlineHatbutton From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1477 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 19259 times:
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Quoting Adam42185 (Reply 8):
I was just thinking of the PC-12. I could definitely see them operating the PC-12 on their flights, or the caravan, I hadnt thought of that at first. Either or, the colors would look nice on them, I think.

What are the operating costs of a king air 90 vs PC-12 vs caravan? acquisition costs?
Would a king are 200 fit into the picture or is that too large?



Quoting KPDX (Reply 6):
PC-12's would be nice!



Quoting CHRISBA777ER (Reply 7):
I'd say PC12s are the most likely but then I'm pretty sure a King Air version would do the job.

I hate to burst the bubble but there is no way the PC-12 would work. That plane is really too stinking expensive. I think last time I calculated, the direct and indirect operating costs are somewhere near $1000/hr where I think 9K's costs on the 402 are $500-600/hr. Plus flying a pressurized aircraft on some of their 20 minute flights? That seems like too many cycles for that kind of plane.

Dan Wolf has been quoted before about discussing options for the Caravan with Cessna. That would be the most logical choice right now because of it's lack of pressurization and it's costs.

Acquisition costs are really the big damper on this. A PC-12 will run at least $2-3 million a piece. I doubt 9K has anywhere near $100 million to replace 50 Cessna 402s. Leasing costs on a PC-12 are insanely high as well. But even the Caravan at around a million a pop is going to be tough. Wolf has said before that 9K's model works best because they own pretty much all of the 402s outright. So there are a lot less overhead costs. Dishing out $20-30k a month for a PC-12 is a huge hit to the bottom line.

Quoting 727forever (Reply 4):
think that there is demand for this type of airplane world wide, but the cost is going to be such that I doubt you will see manufacturers jumping to build one because they know the operators needing them won't be able to afford an airplane that will cost between $1.5million and $2.5 million.

 checkmark 

Quoting A342 (Reply 9):
Very simple: The Reims-Cessna F406. It's basically a 404 Titan with PT6s:

http://www.reims-aviation-industries...ue=en

It's a beautiful plane and would work well, but I've searched around and it costs anywhere from $1.5-3 million as well. I'm guessing the costs is one of the reasons they've made so few examples.

This will be very interesting for sure. I'm curious to see what they end up with or if they can push someone hard enough to get something new built.

[Edited 2009-04-30 09:18:43]

User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2951 posts, RR: 37
Reply 11, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 19224 times:
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Quoting A342 (Reply 9):
Very simple: The Reims-Cessna F406. It's basically a 404 Titan with PT6s:

The 404 is an option sure... but the question is is it worth buying used airframes to re-engine or is it better to just go all new with a PC-12/Caravan/King Air/etc option? Especially considering that, as i recall, Cape Air has some of the final 402Cs built, which means they are younger than any 404?

There are a whole bunch of turboprop or frames with conversion options from the Cessna line (414, 421, 441, etc) but none of them are current.

Another possible option might be the T-1040 from Piper, but so very very few of those were produced i doubt Cape could source enough to replace all their great multitudes (50+?) of C402s... though I think (maybe???) that the Cheyenne IV jigs are "in storage" so maybe Piper would consider restarting production if Cape Air committed to replacing the whole fleet?

However the more i think about it, the more i think that the 208B Grand Caravan with it's PT6 is probably the best option, maybe a slow replacement of the oldest 402s and keep the younger ones for another 10 years?

The 208 is light, efficient for the stage lengths Cape Air averages (i dunno about those longer flights they do into VT/NH/NY/ME but if the 402 works the 208 is only slightly slower), the right size, been around in service for many years and is in current production.



Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
User currently offlineHatbutton From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1477 posts, RR: 14
Reply 12, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 19213 times:
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Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 11):
The 404 is an option sure... but the question is is it worth buying used airframes to re-engine or is it better to just go all new with a PC-12/Caravan/King Air/etc option? Especially considering that, as i recall, Cape Air has some of the final 402Cs built, which means they are younger than any 404?

The Reims F406 is not a refurb. It is a brand new airplane that Reims got the plans from Cessna for and started reproducing them starting back in 1983.


User currently offlinePiedmontINT From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 376 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 19202 times:

I agree with the others, the PC-12 is way too expensive to operate for those kinds of markets. Way too high of acquisition costs and the likelyhood of Cessna refurbishing and rebuilding those old 402s is pretty unlikely. However, with Viking Air of Canada aquiring the type certificates for the entire classic DHC line, I would think Cape Air would be talking with them about some new build Twin Otters or even the possibility of them restarting production on the single Otter

User currently offlineAdam42185 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 408 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 19199 times:



Quoting Hatbutton (Reply 10):
That plane is really too stinking expensive. I think last time I calculated, the direct and indirect operating costs are somewhere near $1000/hr where I think 9K's costs on the 402 are $500-600/hr

Thanks for the info
However, there would be more people in a PC-12 than in a Cessna 402, wouldnt there? But given that difference in operating costs I cant see it working either.

Quoting Hatbutton (Reply 10):
Plus flying a pressurized aircraft on some of their 20 minute flights?

Do you have to exercise the pressurization of the cabin always on a plane that has a pressurized cabin or could you just fly at a lower altitude?

Quoting Hatbutton (Reply 10):
Acquisition costs are really the big damper on this. A PC-12 will run at least $2-3 million a piece. I doubt 9K has anywhere near $100 million to replace 50 Cessna 402s

If they could get them at $2 million, i was thinking they would get more like 35 PC-12s instead of 50, given the size increase, so that would be roughly $70 mil on the cheap end -- how much money would you estimate they are going to be able to spend?

With caravans being $1 Mil per frame that does seem more realistic to me, but still I would assume they would order fewer frames than 50. What are the operating costs on the caravan?


User currently offlineAirevents From Germany, joined Jan 2002, 866 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 19163 times:

What about the Gippsland GA-8? It is flying with a number of airlines now and from what I see on pictures, it should carry about 9 pax. Dunno about speed, range and fuel consumption though.


www.airevents.com
User currently offlineTransIsland From Bahamas, joined Mar 2004, 2038 posts, RR: 9
Reply 16, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 19161 times:


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Not as fancy as a C402, but I reckon it would look good in Cape Air colours. Better than this abomination, anyways.



I'm an aviation expert. I have Sky Juice for breakfast.
User currently offlineHatbutton From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1477 posts, RR: 14
Reply 17, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 19153 times:
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Quoting Adam42185 (Reply 14):
Thanks for the info
However, there would be more people in a PC-12 than in a Cessna 402, wouldnt there? But given that difference in operating costs I cant see it working either.

Unfortunately no. For Part 135 operations like 9K...you can only take 9. I think the PC-12 can only legally take 11 anyways. Correct me if I'm wrong. So even that is not enough.

Quoting Adam42185 (Reply 14):
Do you have to exercise the pressurization of the cabin always on a plane that has a pressurized cabin or could you just fly at a lower altitude?

Good question. I'm going to guess you do.

Quoting Adam42185 (Reply 14):
If they could get them at $2 million, i was thinking they would get more like 35 PC-12s instead of 50, given the size increase, so that would be roughly $70 mil on the cheap end -- how much money would you estimate they are going to be able to spend?

With caravans being $1 Mil per frame that does seem more realistic to me, but still I would assume they would order fewer frames than 50. What are the operating costs on the caravan?

Tough to say. Since 9K is a private comapny, they only release limited numbers to the public. Though Wolf has said before that margins are quite thin like any airline. So I'd bet in a good year they make $5 million and normally probably $1-2 million. Though that is just a huge guess based on my observations. So even an order for 35 of something at $1 million a piece is huge. Odds are they are going to have to finance or lease. And they might be able to afford it that way, but no matter what it's going to eat into their profit since the costs are going to be higher.

I think the Caravan is around the same operating costs of a 402, perhaps a tad higher because of the acquisition costs. So I think it is the best replacement out there in light of that. Either way like I said, it's still going to cost them a little more than a 402. But since there are tons of Caravans around the world, and the line is still open...parts and support will be much easier to come by. So maybe that's where they can see some savings to offset a higher acquisition cost.


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 18, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 19071 times:
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I wonder if they've considered the Vulcanair Viator:


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Seems to have very similar performance:



Compared with the 402C:
Powerplants- Two 240kW (325hp) turbocharged and fuel injected TSIO-520-VBs

Performance - 402C - Max speed 428km/h (230kt), max cruising speed 394km/h (213kt), long range cruising speed 304km/h (164kt). Initial rate of climb 1450ft/min. Service ceiling 26,900ft. Range with reserves at economical cruising speed 2360km (1273nm).

Weights - 402C - Empty (Businessliner) 1845kg (4069lb), max takeoff 3107kg (6850lb).

Range might be an issue. Product support, too. Perhaps Cessna could purchase the type certificate and manufacture them as Cessnas, like they did with the Columbia singles.

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21103 posts, RR: 56
Reply 19, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 19033 times:



Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 5):
However if they would consider singles as well, then the Caravan line and the PC-12 might come into play. Though the PC-12 is probably too much plane for Cape Air's routes.

The PC-12 would definitely be too much. The Caravan would work, if they're willing to go for a single.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 5):
maybe just update the existing pistons to something slightly bigger but more efficient?

Might be a good fit for a turbo-diesel.

Quoting Adam42185 (Reply 14):
Do you have to exercise the pressurization of the cabin always on a plane that has a pressurized cabin or could you just fly at a lower altitude?

No, you could just not pressurize the airplane.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineHatbutton From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1477 posts, RR: 14
Reply 20, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 18982 times:
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Quoting Mir (Reply 19):
The Caravan would work, if they're willing to go for a single.

I've done a ton of research on a Part 135 operation over the last couple years and to find the perfect airplane for it and I have come up with little. There just isn't much out there unless you are going to spend over $1 million.

One little airplane that does show some potential is the Pac-750 XSTOL. It's made in New Zealand and is a rugged STOL aircraft with lift capabilities like that of the Caravan. The acquisition costs of a new one are slightly lower than the Caravan as well. And the airframe is all metal so there is a lot less maintenance on it. They claim you can go 36,000 hours without ever having to replace much on the airframe.

The engine they use has a little less power than the Caravan's but it can still match it in speed. The airplane has been approved for longer maintenance intervals so the maintenance costs would be lower than a Caravan. Most of the operators use it for skydiving as it was originally intended for that. But there are some ops in places in Africa and Indonesia with the cargo pod on the bottom and a 9-seat or cargo configuration. It has a fixed landing gear like the Caravan but that reduces maintenance and insurance costs compared to retractable gear.

Like the Caravan it is nowhere near the cruising speed of the 402...but that is just something that 9K might have to sacrifice.

Check the 750 out...

www.aerospace.co.nz


User currently offlineLowrider From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 3220 posts, RR: 10
Reply 21, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 18968 times:

I think the turbine Islander or the 406 are the best two options. They do too much overwater work to look at singles, even if it is only for appearence purposes. If they were willing to go 121, the new Twin Otter would be a great fit.

[Edited 2009-04-30 11:49:39]


Proud OOTSK member
User currently offline413x3 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1983 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 18953 times:

operating a single over water is just asking for ridiculous insurance costs

User currently offlineHatbutton From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1477 posts, RR: 14
Reply 23, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 18823 times:
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Quoting 413x3 (Reply 22):
operating a single over water is just asking for ridiculous insurance costs

True but I wonder what the requirements are? So long as you are within a certain distance from a landing point is it okay?

Kenmore Air flies Caravans over parts of water in the Puget Sound. I wonder if they have to pay more for insurance.


User currently offlineDiamondFlyer From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1400 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (4 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 18801 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 18):
I wonder if they've considered the Vulcanair Viator:

It looks good, but its a turboprop. That's going to cause operating costs to increase. Really, right now there is nothing in the same market as a Cessna 402. There really isn't any demand for piston twins. I'm sure they could go with a Kingair 90, but that is overkill for the mission. As is the PC-12. If they could get a new production Islander, that would probably be the best option. Similar engines, so fuel burn should be similar. Almost identical gross weights and useful loads.

-DiamondFlyer



Rock Chalk Jayhawk
25 413x3 : On the topic of the PC-12, the only downside is its cost, right? What if you are a small startup in a good market, and you raise enough money for 2 PC
26 ThirtyEcho : You do NOT have to use pressurization on a pressurized aircraft in all cases. If the mission allows for low altitude flight, it is perfectly OK to no
27 Hatbutton : Well it still burns about 25 more gallons of fuel per hour. The maintenance is higher because the systems are a little more complex. And I believe th
28 A342 : Not sure about that. Avgas will become more expensive and will eventually be phased out. Plus turboprops have longer TBOs and they're way more reliab
29 2H4 : True, but the CEO of Cape Air seems to want to make the switch to Jet-A: 2H4
30 DiamondFlyer : Then I hope they are prepared to raise ticket prices, or, in some cases, complain to the Fed's to give them more money on some of these flights (EAS)
31 Adam42185 : With a long enough life span I would assume a higher acquisition cost could be overcome. Given the info gathered by some other posts on here, however
32 Mir : It would probably mean longer life cycles, since you wouldn't have the stress on the frame. But since pressurized airplanes are designed to take that
33 Hatbutton : Not necessarily. Kenmore Air here in Washington flies Caravan's on a 135 certificate. You just have to outfit the plane with only 9 seats. Cape Air o
34 PiedmontINT : I can vouch for this as well.. I know for a fact that ZK will fly their 1900's below 9000' when pressurization is INOP (which is fairly regularly it
35 Xdlx : Great Plane specs for the 750! Importation & Support is another matter. What ever happened to the days the airlines went to the manufacturers and sai
36 Hatbutton : Exactly. They are supported by Utility Aircraft here in the USA out of California, but there are still less than 50 examples worldwide. Though if 9K
37 Adam42185 : thanks for the info. The only thing that i see as an issue with only fitting the caravan with 9 seats is that seems to me like it would be lost reven
38 Adam42185 : on another note, what is the typical load factor on cape air flights? how many pax do they need to turn a profit?
39 Post contains images FlyPBA : Island Airlines ... Cape Air/Nantucket Air's competitor airline that uses C402s as well just got their first Caravan
40 Hatbutton : Yeah it is 14 at max. If they could fill it that much then it might make sense. But I don't know all the 121 numbers as well to know if it would be w
41 Xdlx : The Caravan is ideal with say 10 seats & some space for luggage, with the G1000 suite a much more capable platform for 9K. I think if they aproached
42 AviationAddict : 100LL is also selling for roughly a $1 to $1.50 more per gallon when compared to Jet-A. Sure, the upfront cost and maintenance costs will probably in
43 DiamondFlyer : Sure, it costs that much more per hour. But, on average, a 402 is going to burn in the neighborhood of 240 pounds (40 gallons) per hour. After a quic
44 Post contains links Kohflot : Another single-engine option would be the Quest Kodiak: http://www.questaircraft.com Cheaper and smaller than a Caravan, but with a PT6 and excellent
45 Max Q : I may be mistaken but wasn't there an FAR prohibiting single engine Aircraft operating IFR for hire ?
46 Post contains links and images DUALRATED : Maybe? But then how would this work? View Large View MediumPhoto © Michael Fast
47 DiamondFlyer : IIRC, it deals with if the airline operates under Part 121 or Part 135. I believe, that under part 135, they can run up to 9 passengers in a single e
48 DUALRATED : This should answer the question. Federal Aviation Administration _______________________________________________________________________ 14 CFR Part
49 ACKattack : First off, this is my first post after a few years of just reading. As a Cape resident and someone who listens to the K9 and ACKair and Island Air C40
50 F9Animal : I think the Caravan is a strong option. However, it is a single engine. Not sure if that is something Cape Air would want to go to, since they have be
51 DUALRATED : Would that be too much airplane for them? Expense ect?
52 NASBWI : Well, for the next 15-20 years (or however long their C402s last), a B1900 might not be such a bad idea during peak seasons to augment their 402 oper
53 Max Q : Or, in other words SE IFR is still not approved. Amending not meaning amended !
54 VirginFlyer : What about reciprocating engines powered by Jet-A i.e. Diesel cycle engines? They're still relatively in their infancy, but from what I last read, th
55 DiamondFlyer : So, then how do you explain GeorgiaSkies flying Cessna 208's with passengers? What was posted to me, means nothing, with out the entire section prohi
56 DUALRATED : No! SE IFR is approved. SE IFR has never not been approved. Now going back to the original question of, This too has always been allowed Empire (and
57 Max Q : My mistake then, it's been a long time since I flew in General aviation and my memory is not so clear of that restriction.
58 ERJ170 : I've noticed that Cape Air is starting service between HPN and ACK/MVY.. is this a Cape Air flight or a subsidized flight. I noticed that they are run
59 Vfw614 : The Airvan has a max. capacity of 7 pax and is pretty slow as well. Without a cargo pod, it also has pretty limited luggage capacity, IIRC. Plus - se
60 Lowrider : Any of those would probably serve well, but I think only the Twin Otter is certified in the US and any of those would require Cape Air to obtain a 12
61 PC12Fan : I, like others, shot from the hip in thinking that the PC-12 would be a good option. But reality says that it is too much aircraft for what is needed.
62 Post contains links Hatbutton : I still think you're going to be hard pressed to find 9K buy the Reims F406. According to this site it costs 2.8-3.5 Euros! http://www.aviastock.com/A
63 Lowrider : They won't convince anyone to open a piston line, particularly in this economy. A new piston twin in that size and payload class would be almost as e
64 Chapavaeaa : Cape is a 121 carrier. They operate two ATR-42's out of Guam
65 727forever : The Do-228 used to be certificated in the U.S. Midways feeder used to fly them in the late 80's early 90's if I remember correctly. This could be a g
66 Hatbutton : I believe they have a 121 and a 135 certificate and only the ATRs are under the 121 cert. All the 402 ops are 135.
67 Lowrider : Right, but the current 228's are built under license in India, unless I am mistaken. I do not know if the license built aircraft conform with the ori
68 Post contains links Baw2198 : How about this one http://www.angelaircraft.com/ Its 8 seats, but only 175 kts. twin engine (lycoming), unpaved landing strip capable. I had a chance
69 Lowrider : I like the design, but those IO-540's will probably burn 15-18 Gal/Hr/side to move 6-7 pax. It also doesn't get them away from 100LL, unless some Rol
70 Access-Air : Old King Air 90s cannot carry the baggage that a 402 can. Besides, isnt there a wing spar strap that had to be added to early Beech King Air/Queen Ai
71 Post contains links Lowrider : http://www.commuterair.com/commercia...cements-modifications/catpass-250/ Found this company that will mod King Air 200's for more baggage room and se
72 Fallingeese : The King Air 200 is an amazing aircraft. The charter outfit in Canada that I work for heavily utilizes the King Air 200 for charter flights - many in
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