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Airlines In India Also Asked To Cite Final Prices  
User currently offlineSR183 From Switzerland, joined Apr 2009, 88 posts, RR: 1
Posted (5 years 4 months 5 hours ago) and read 2978 times:

After the EU (http://www.eturbonews.com/5922/eu-rules-against-deceptive-airline-ticket-prices-come-force) and many other countries like Switzerland, Indian airlines are also asked to quote the final ticket price that the passengers have to pay in their advertisements:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/A...yable-fare/articleshow/4493315.cms

This is a necessary and great move that makes the fares predictable for passengers with all the taxes and other surcharges.

Which are the countries that are still allowed to publish fares without the hidden items?


Next flights: June - ZRH-MUC-ATH-MUC-ZRH, July - ZRH-DXB-HYD,COK-DXB-ZRH
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNimish From India, joined Feb 2005, 3224 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2889 times:

This is a great move and I hope to see less deceptive advertisements in the near future. I love it when SQ always advertises the real fare these days!


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User currently offlineJoffie From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 806 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 2812 times:

I agree. I remember the big saga with DJ when they first came in 2000. They were offering deals like 99 cents, then you go to the next screen and its like $50 tax or something. Qantas used to do the same, but the government changed it. I think its great. Nothing worse than airlines advertising cheap flights, then you purchase and the tax doubles the fair.

User currently offlinePNQIAD From India, joined May 2006, 586 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2786 times:

And even better is the fact that the DGCA India order applies to ALL airlines operating out of India - including foreign carriers.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 4, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2673 times:

A Welcome move.....Puts an end to all the confusion.....Better late than never.
regds
MEL.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineLightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13047 posts, RR: 100
Reply 5, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2668 times:
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I applaud this legislation.

Quoting Joffie (Reply 2):
. I think its great. Nothing worse than airlines advertising cheap flights, then you purchase and the tax doubles the fair.

Nothing wrong with them pointing out the taxes.  Wink But it best to have the full fare published.

I would also add they should have to publish two fares:
Full fare (with taxes, fees, etc.)
Full fare with one 40lbm bag. (Or note "Two 23kg bags included in published fare", etc.)

It should be obvious if you cannot take a bag without paying more. Nothing wrong with chargine for it... just make it obvious.

Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlineEDICHC From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2626 times:



Quoting Lightsaber (Reply 5):
Quoting Joffie (Reply 2):
. I think its great. Nothing worse than airlines advertising cheap flights, then you purchase and the tax doubles the fair.

Nothing wrong with them pointing out the taxes.   But it best to have the full fare published.

From the perspective of the carrier that wants to make a point about what they perceive to be excessive taxes they could always quote along side the final price something along the lines of..."If it wan't for government taxes you would have paid $XXX less for this ticket".


User currently offlineKevin777 From Denmark, joined Sep 2006, 1165 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 2603 times:

Sounds great, it's totally annoying with all these "Rs 99" fares that turn into Rs 3.000 at the end of the booking.

Quoting Lightsaber (Reply 5):
Nothing wrong with them pointing out the taxes.

Well, true, if it was only the taxes they pointed out - there have been many cases where airlines have quoted, say, a 1 Euro Fare + 29 Euro tax; however, it's rather more like 15 Euro tax and 15 Euro fare, because half the "tax" is not a fee that goes to the airport and the government, t goes right to the airline. For instance, Ryanair flew on Esbjerg, Denmark, a while ago, and they often quoted a DKK 50 Fare and DKK 200 tax, because 200 was the published airport tax in Esbjerg Airport. However, Ryanair had a special agreement with the airport, where they only paid less than half of the DKK 200 per pax - yet they still charged the full tax on the tickets.

Quoting SR183 (Thread starter):
Which are the countries that are still allowed to publish fares without the hidden items?

In the UK it's still allowed. A good way of checking for Europe at least is going to Ryanair's webpage and flick between country sites; if the advertised fares are above, say, EUR 20, then taxes are included, if they are around 2 Euros, they're not.

Regards,

Kevin777  Smile



"I was waiting for you at DFW, but you must have been in LUV" CPH-HAM-CPH CR9
User currently offlineColts001 From United States of America, joined Mar 2009, 93 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 years 3 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 2541 times:



Quoting EDICHC (Reply 6):
From the perspective of the carrier that wants to make a point about what they perceive to be excessive taxes they could always quote along side the final price something along the lines of..."If it wan't for government taxes you would have paid $XXX less for this ticket".

It is not the taxes that caused this ruling, it is the fuel surcharge airlines were charging. The fuel surcharges went up with every increase in actual fuel prices but when fuel price came down the surcharge didn't come down by the same level.


User currently offlineAviationbuff From India, joined Mar 2008, 1425 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (5 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2431 times:



Quoting Colts001 (Reply 8):
It is not the taxes that caused this ruling, it is the fuel surcharge airlines were charging. The fuel surcharges went up with every increase in actual fuel prices but when fuel price came down the surcharge didn't come down by the same level.

Exactly...the airlines were fooling the passengers by increasing the fuel surcharge even while the cost of the fuel was coming down. They recently increased the fuel surcharge again, which might have frustrated the government.


User currently offlineLightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13047 posts, RR: 100
Reply 10, posted (5 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2396 times:
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Quoting Kevin777 (Reply 7):
However, Ryanair had a special agreement with the airport, where they only paid less than half of the DKK 200 per pax - yet they still charged the full tax on the tickets.

Good point. Hence one reason I phrased my reply how I did. Publish the who cost and then break it down as the airline sees fit.

Quoting Colts001 (Reply 8):
The fuel surcharges went up with every increase in actual fuel prices but when fuel price came down the surcharge didn't come down by the same level.

Oh well... I dislike fuel surcharges. They're only there as certain customers have a contract ticket price but do have to pay the fuel surcharge. I'd prefer a simple clean ticket price. In the end, I want to know early what the final price will be, so I approve of this rule.  Smile


Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlineSR183 From Switzerland, joined Apr 2009, 88 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (5 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2385 times:



Quoting Kevin777 (Reply 7):
In the UK
it's still allowed. A good way of checking for Europe at least is going to Ryanair's webpage and flick between country sites; if the advertised fares are above, say, EUR 20, then taxes are included, if they are around 2 Euros, they're not.

Are you sure that these deceptive fare ads are allowed in the UK? I believe all the EU members have to stick to the rules. Maybe Ryanair have a few tickets that they also sell for 2 EUR, where they don't charge much taxes??



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