Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Allegiant Air MD80 Tailcone Accidently Jettisoned @LEX  
User currently offlineGulfstream650 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 539 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 10645 times:

I heard that the ground crew the other day at Lexington accidently jettisoned the tail section of an MD-80 at Lexington. Apparently there was some sort of problem with the stairs of the aircraft and as a result the rear stairs had to be used but the ground crew pulled the emergency jettison handle and as a result the tail section quite litterally 'fell off' onto the ramp.

I found this picture depicting what happens:



and a video on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLFJcA3Hlgo

I don't have any more info on this - anyone else know more?


I don't proclaim to be the best pilot in the world but I'm safe
31 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineToltommy From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 3308 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 10568 times:

It's not as easy to jettison the tailcone as you might think. In my experience, it's a big red handle that you have to pull, not the same as a slide, which can be triggered by simply opening an armed door. Someone had to work hard to make this happen.

And it'll be expensive for the ground handling company at LEX that did it. That's what you get for lowest bidder. Not that the manager there has to worry. I believe he's married to the daughter of the owner....


User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 10371 times:

Here is the explanation I found on a website. Don't know if it is accurate. I do know that MD-80's do not have a door on the right rear side.

"Most airlines in the medium size category have 8 emergency exits; two up front, four over the wings and two in the back. However, the MD-80 does not have two exits in the aft part of the fuselage, only one. Instead, the 8th exit is located in the tail. In fact, during an emergency evacuation the whole tailcone is ejected from the fuselage."

http://www.coolsky.no/super80/trivia/trivia.htm


User currently offlineLindy Field From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 3131 posts, RR: 13
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 10326 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Oh well, better to lose the tail cone on the ramp than in flight...

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Sunbird Photos by Don Boyd



User currently offlinePilotNTrng From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 897 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 10302 times:

It was a quickflight service agent. Don't ask me why?!!!!!, but they thought it was the aft stair control lever. Allegiant clearly marks the panel doors and the tail cone jettison release is higher up and clearly marked as well. how this stuff happens is beyond me.


Booooo Lois, Yaaaa Beer!!!
User currently offlineToltommy From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 3308 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9761 times:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but the lever for the airstairs is an up/down type, and the jettison is a pull type marked in red. Hard to miss, unless you are not properly trained.

Can the plane be ferried without the tailcone, or does Allegiant have to get repairs done locally?


User currently offlineOkie From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 3190 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9608 times:



Quoting PilotNTrng (Reply 4):
It was a quickflight service agent. Don't ask me why?!!!!!, but they thought it was the aft stair control lever. Allegiant clearly marks the panel doors and the tail cone jettison release is higher up and clearly marked as well. how this stuff happens is beyond me.

You hear of a MD-80 series tailcone being jettisoned several times a year from my experience.
Whether being clearly marked or not as to its purpose, you still have to have the emergency egress marked in such a manner as to allow an untrained passenger to be able to deploy the emergency exit if needed.

So the real issue here is training on the service agent involved. The above link shows the tailcone being caught by a basket device to preclude damage to the tailcone. I am not sure if a tailcone that hits the tarmac is a write off or just needs a repair to be serviceable again. Costly none the less.

Looks like tea and biscuits with the boss for sure.

Okie


User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 9417 times:

I just don't get it. This is the second time this has been reported this year (that I've seen). The first was an emergency response person that did it. How people manage to even get to this handle is beyond me. It's got to be 15 feet off the ground! You need stairs or a truck or something to reach it. And some people think just about anyone can work on the ramp. Sheesh.

User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 9351 times:

You have to try real hard to jettison the tailcone from the ground. Unless you're Shaquille O'Neal you are going to need a ladder to pull that handle. It's also clearly marked as an emergency jettison handle. Darwin at work I guess.

User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 26021 posts, RR: 22
Reply 9, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 9351 times:



Quoting Lindy Field (Reply 3):
Oh well, better to lose the tail cone on the ramp than in flight...

An AC DC-9-32 lost the tailcone, rear door to the emergency exit, and part of the pressure builkhead at 25,000 ft. over the Atlantic after departure from BOS in 1979 due to an undetected crack in the pressure bulkhead. Luckily nobody was sucked out of the 5 ft hole due to the sudden depressurization. It made a safe emergency landing back at BOS.

Coincidentally, the same aircraft (C-FTLU) was written off 4 years later in 1983 after an emergency landing at CVG on a DFW-YYZ flight due to a fire in one of the aft lavatories. 23 of the 46 on board died before they could evacuate the burning aircraft.


User currently offlineArffguy From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 158 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 9094 times:

I would imagine that it was done from the inside, not externally.

Quoting Pilotboi (Reply 7):
The first was an emergency response person that did it.

My crews are taught not to touch anything unless 1) it is a real emergency 2) there is an airline representative there to show us the item and/or demonstrate it's operation. If we are doing self walk-arounds then we don't touch anything we haven't been trained to do and given permission to touch beforehand.

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):

I was unaware that those incidents were the same aircraft. Wow.



Time to spare, go by air.
User currently offlineTOLtommy From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 3308 posts, RR: 5
Reply 11, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 9037 times:



Quoting Pilotboi (Reply 7):
How people manage to even get to this handle is beyond me. It's got to be 15 feet off the ground!



Quoting LMP737 (Reply 8):
You have to try real hard to jettison the tailcone from the ground

Was it deployed from the ground? It can also be deployed from inside the aircraft. There's a catwalk like structure behind the emergency door.


User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7438 posts, RR: 50
Reply 12, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 8955 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting TOLtommy (Reply 11):
Was it deployed from the ground? It can also be deployed from inside the aircraft. There's a catwalk like structure behind the emergency door.

If the bulkhead door is "armed", the door is opened from the inside, you don't even have to pull the jettison handle to deploy the tailcone



Made from jets!
User currently offlineTWAL1011727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 638 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 8861 times:



Quoting Toltommy (Reply 1):
That's what you get for lowest bidder.

Thats not necessarily true....even the most experienced ramper can have a brain fart...
Please don't assume that it was bid problem.

Quoting Toltommy (Reply 5):
unless you are not properly trained

See above statement....If the tailcone/slide was deployed by a ramper....either stupidity or training is the issue.

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 2):
whole tailcone is ejected from the fuselage."

Its not "ejected" it just is released and falls to the ground.

Quoting Toltommy (Reply 5):
Can the plane be ferried without the tailcone, or does Allegiant have to get repairs done locally?

I talked to Deltas MD88 maint desk...normally - no....
but the airplane can fly without it, as already seen. So , if an engineering override order is available - maybe.

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 12):
If the bulkhead door is "armed", the door is opened from the inside, you don't even have to pull the jettison handle to deploy the tailcone

If deployed from inside, I would think than either a pax or flt attndnt would deploy the tailcone.
Either way, an "inside job" is a flt attndnt foo-pah for not disarming the door.

If the tailcone was deployed, then the slide would be inflated.
That would require another slide before revenue flt. possibly even a maint ferry flt.

KD


User currently offlineMayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10670 posts, RR: 14
Reply 14, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 8698 times:

Used to happen once in a while with newbies while working the DC-9s. The rear airstair handle and the tailcone jettison handle were behind separate panels but right next to each other at the rear of the a/c. Especially at night, you had to be careful which panel you opened and which handle you pulled. When the MD-80s and later came along, the handles were put on opposit sides of the a/c, at the rear.


"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineUSAFDO From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 443 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 8607 times:

HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE....to have a tail cone exit...fall off onto the ground, and then...THEN HAVE TO BE PULLED AWAY so the evacuation slide can be used???

I don't understand this... the video shows someone pulling the tail cone out of the way so the slide can be utilized.....

This doesn't seem to make any sense..... someone please elaborate....  white 


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15838 posts, RR: 27
Reply 16, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 8558 times:



Quoting USAFDO (Reply 15):
I don't understand this... the video shows someone pulling the tail cone out of the way so the slide can be utilized.....

That was just for the purposes of the test I think, and so that the tailcone would not be damaged and couldn't roll or bounce in such a way as to damage the plane. In reality I think that the tailcone would just roll away so the slide could be used.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7438 posts, RR: 50
Reply 17, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 8553 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting USAFDO (Reply 15):
THEN HAVE TO BE PULLED AWAY so the evacuation slide can be used???

Actually, the design of the tailcone is for it to simply "roll' out of the path of the slide when it deploys

Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 13):
I talked to Deltas MD88 maint desk...normally - no....
but the airplane can fly without it, as already seen. So , if an engineering override order is available - maybe.

There's group of skydivers that actually parachute out of a tailcone of a DC9



Made from jets!
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15838 posts, RR: 27
Reply 18, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 8527 times:



Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 17):
There's group of skydivers that actually parachute out of a tailcone of a DC9

Did they have to modify the plane by disabling the Cooper lock?



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineAvConsultant From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1360 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 8303 times:



Quoting Toltommy (Reply 1):
That's what you get for lowest bidder. Not that the manager there has to worry. I believe he's married to the daughter of the owner....

Ouch!!!  stirthepot 
Not so obvious!

Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 13):
If the tailcone was deployed, then the slide would be inflated.
That would require another slide before revenue flt. possibly even a maint ferry flt.

Unless they have a "fly away kit" carrying certain items not to be stranded in a remote area excluded large and heavy items (ie tailcone). I was referring to a slide. Which G3 might.

Quoting USAFDO (Reply 15):
THEN HAVE TO BE PULLED AWAY so the evacuation slide can be used???

In this case, it was pulled away not to damage the tail cone. They're made of composite or fiberglass and will shatter.

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 17):
There's group of skydivers that actually parachute out of a tailcone of a DC9

The irony is the aircraft used is a DC-9-21. Formerly SAS, ValuJet and the 1st Allegiant.

Certainly not as ironic the AC aircraft.


User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 8028 times:

The Cooper lock was a B727 aft airstair mod.

User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15838 posts, RR: 27
Reply 21, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 7986 times:



Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 20):
The Cooper lock was a B727 aft airstair mod.

I thought that all aircraft with aft airstairs were equipped with such a mechanism. I could be wrong though.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1485 posts, RR: 10
Reply 22, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 7874 times:



Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 13):

If deployed from inside, I would think than either a pax or flt attndnt would deploy the tailcone.
Either way, an "inside job" is a flt attndnt foo-pah for not disarming the door.

These doors are not armed and disarmed in the sense that most people are used to. They're technically ALWAYS armed. There are two handles available for operation, one you use for normal ops and one for emergencies only. One handle is located above the other on the aft pressure bulkhead door. To arm and disarm the door, all the FA has to do is raise or lower a panel that essential exposes the operating handle that's needed. For instance... for flight, the cover is lowered to expose the emergency handle.. and once parked it's then raised covering the emergency handle and exposing the normal operating handle.

If you use the normal handle the door simply opens.. that's all. You then have access to the tailcone (via a pull down cat-walk) or use of the ventral stairs. If you use the emergency handle it opens the door, releases the tailcone and the slide then falls over the edge and inflates automatically.

If the tailcone fails to drop AFTER using the emergency handle you can walk into the tailcone and pull the release handle. This should release the tailcone and ALSO the slide should drop out over the edge (the slide cover is attached to the tailcone so once that falls, in theory it should take the slide with it. If THAT fails then you can go over to the slide and manually push it over the edge.

I don't know if that helps explain the process a little better or not but as you can see, it's much more complicated than a conventional exit and CAN be confusing, especially for the untrained.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineFlyboy1108 From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 94 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 7227 times:



Quoting AvConsultant (Reply 19):
Unless they have a "fly away kit" carrying certain items not to be stranded in a remote area excluded large and heavy items (ie tailcone). I was referring to a slide. Which G3 might.

Yes G4 has a flyaway kit on board all of its aircraft. However because any emergency slides carried in the cargo compartments (and thus excluding the slides equipped on the exits) are considered HAZMAT by the DOT (b/c of compressed gas used to inflate it), and this would require us to fill out a NOPIC every time the plane leaves the gate, they aren't included in the flyaway kit.

NCB
ABE



"God is great, beer is good, and people are crazy"
User currently offlinePilotntrng From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 897 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (5 years 6 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 7049 times:



Quoting Okie (Reply 6):

No offense, but what a lame excuse. I work for the company that this agent works ( or worked for ) I know exactly what happened. That tail cone jettison handle is not for passengers, its for emergency crews. The person who did this had to get a step ladder , which is fact. This person is a moron as I stated before. allegiant clearly paints the aft stiar control lever yellow.



Booooo Lois, Yaaaa Beer!!!
25 KingAir200 : That's a hell of a brain fart. I've lowered the ventrals on our DC-9s at Northwest several times and never once pulled the red handle with the red ou
26 KingAir200 : Or aircraft left, depending on how you're looking at it.
27 AvConsultant : Surely not!! Those constraints went away years ago; unless Allegiant is using a dated flight dispatch system. Most of your dispatch systems tie into
28 TWAL1011727 : The DC9 / MD80s had a handle inside a compartment located just outside the aft exit door,left side.....after DB Cooper, the handle and mechanism were
29 AvConsultant : Makes for a great tail stand, I did see an Eastern 727 in ATL taxing with the aft-airstairs down. That was a weird site to see. Maybe it was being ta
30 Skymiler : I knew of both incidents. I lost a friend in the CVG tragedy (who did not make it out) but did not know that they were the same aircraft. We learned
31 Mayor : In SLC at DL we used to put the airstairs down and locked when we overnighted the 727s as we didn't want to pay for a special trip for the fueling co
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Air Canada 747 Tail Strike posted Mon Mar 26 2001 19:52:12 by Jgardiner
Air Canada A330 Tail Nos. posted Wed Jan 26 2000 05:51:45 by YEG 757
Allegiant Air MD80 At SJC posted Thu Jun 26 2008 17:38:51 by SJC30L
Allegiant Air Stock Soars $5.28 [11%] Today! posted Mon Apr 13 2009 13:04:19 by YNGguins
Allegiant Air Flight Strikes Eagle Upon Takeoff posted Mon Apr 6 2009 15:17:39 by N484ER
Allegiant Air To Add Another Focus City/Hub posted Thu Jan 29 2009 07:40:38 by YNGguins
Allegiant Air (G4) Seats Vs Everyone Else's Coach posted Tue Jan 6 2009 15:31:33 by GSPSPOT
Allegiant Air Officially Adding 3rd YNG-SFB Flight posted Mon Jan 5 2009 15:22:34 by YNGguins
Colgan Air Saab - White Body/Black Tail? posted Thu Jul 31 2008 11:32:44 by KcrwFlyer
What Do You Know About Allegiant Air? posted Sun Jun 8 2008 17:04:31 by Skyhawk