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How To Become An Airliner Pilot!  
User currently offlineTiktokJAKE From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2009, 124 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 10505 times:

Hello! When I am older I would really like to be an airliner pilot for the likes of BA or VS!

What qualification do I need and What training courses should I go on??

I need to start young and Im 15 so any help ?

Also what is the life of a pilot really like?

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRoyalAirMaroc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 10451 times:

This is a big question to ask, but im very short it has already been answered in detail. Just search the A.net Forums.

SInce your in the UK:

I would recommend looking at these schools :

Oxford Aviation Academy

Cabair

Flight Training Europe

CTC

These FTO's offer intergarted courses which is usually the best way to go (my opinion). Allows you to have a complete ATPL license in around 68 weeks. However, it does cost around £75 - £80k including all living costs whilst on the course.



Life is a Journey, One Which I hope will include alot of Flights !! =]
User currently offlineSandroZRH From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 3414 posts, RR: 50
Reply 2, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 10433 times:



Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 1):
However, it does cost around £75 - £80k including all living costs whilst on the course.

Are there no airline sponsored cadet programs in the UK?


User currently offlineTiktokJAKE From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2009, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 10392 times:

Haa, I just spoke to my mum and dad and they said! Its worth the money if its my dream! Can you get no cheaper?

User currently offlineNKMCO From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 96 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 10309 times:

I'm in the US, and this is what I did - I bought a training plane (Cessna 172) for about USD 32,000, and am flying the heck out of it. I bought it 2 months ago, and I'm just about done with my private license. It's also instrument rated so I can do my instrument/commercial on it too. Right now all I pay for is gas and the instructor (maintenance is minor cost). When I'm done with everything I'll sell it for about the same amount totaling my initial flight training at about 15-20 thousand dollars...

User currently offlineHeathrow From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2005, 967 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 10246 times:

if money is an issue, join the RAF. If not, as has been said, you can take corses for arond 80 thousand pounds.

User currently offlineEXAAUADL From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 10168 times:

you can go to Embry Riddle for less than cost in UK I think

User currently offlineTrystero From Portugal, joined Oct 2008, 244 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 10095 times:

Near forty. A bit overweight, with high cholesterol and high blood pressure. No hope, I think...  Sad


Of course I love you. Now get me a beer.
User currently offlineRoyalAirMaroc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 10044 times:



Quoting SandroZRH (Reply 2):
Are there no airline sponsored cadet programs in the UK?

To my knowledge, there is just one very very very small cargo company in the UK who does sponsored training. Other then that, It's pretty much RAF or Self-Sponsored training.

Quoting TiktokJAKE (Reply 3):
Haa, I just spoke to my mum and dad and they said! Its worth the money if its my dream! Can you get no cheaper?

Well your one of the few that are privileged to have parents who can afford it. My dream is to become a pilot. Unfortunately, £80k seems to be out of he question. So instead i plan to work as an Air Traffic controller until I'm around 25. Hopefully, would have saved enough by then. I'm in my 1st year of college so hopefully should be applying to join NATS next year.

Quoting NKMCO (Reply 4):

Wow, never heard of that one before. Great Idea in my opinion. However, in the UK, the general consensus is that most airlines do look at the training school you graduated from. For example, BA famously only take Integrated ab-initio Graduates from 4 of their *chosen* schools: which are, OAA, FTE, CTC and Cabair.

Further More Jake, Since your 15 at the moment, i strongly suggest you do a lot of research into a career as a pilot. OAA flying school have a very good Forum with a huge wealth of information for wannabees also check PP-rune.



Life is a Journey, One Which I hope will include alot of Flights !! =]
User currently offlineKhobar From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2379 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 9990 times:



Quoting NKMCO (Reply 4):
I'm in the US, and this is what I did - I bought a training plane (Cessna 172) for about USD 32,000, and am flying the heck out of it. I bought it 2 months ago, and I'm just about done with my private license. It's also instrument rated so I can do my instrument/commercial on it too. Right now all I pay for is gas and the instructor (maintenance is minor cost). When I'm done with everything I'll sell it for about the same amount totaling my initial flight training at about 15-20 thousand dollars...

You WHAT?

What kind of Cessna 172 can you get for $32K? That's a heck of an idea, but I have to ask: what's the real cost (fuel, insurance, maintenance, fees (landing and other))??? Hmm, you've given me an idea. Am very interested in your response.


User currently offlineVeeseeten From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2008, 169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 9982 times:

If you want to fly for BA you really should get A levels in Maths and Physics - and given your current age, study very hard for your GCSE's. Any advice about where to train is moot right now, you must get the grades to even think about applying for a scheme at Oxford or wherever, if your ultimate goal is (specifically) BA.

User currently offlineNKMCO From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 96 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 9902 times:



Quoting Khobar (Reply 9):
What kind of Cessna 172 can you get for $32K? That's a heck of an idea, but I have to ask: what's the real cost (fuel, insurance, maintenance, fees (landing and other))??? Hmm, you've given me an idea. Am very interested in your response.

I was lucky - got a great 172P (1983) with low engine hours (300 SMOH) since I bought it from a flight school that needed money (pretty bad apparently). Real cost - $3.60 for a gallon of 100LL (burns about 6-8 GPH), tie-down is $85 a month, insurance $950 a year, maintenance guy for $40 per hour when something is needed...


User currently offline2175301 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 1022 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 9884 times:



Quoting Veeseeten (Reply 10):
If you want to fly for BA you really should get A levels in Maths and Physics - and given your current age, study very hard for your GCSE's. Any advice about where to train is moot right now, you must get the grades to even think about applying for a scheme at Oxford or wherever, if your ultimate goal is (specifically) BA.

And, start hanging around a nearby airport with private planes, meet the owners and pilots, help out, etc. When i was your age I hung around - got invited along on some day flying - joined the CAP (Civil Air Patrol), "crashed" the WWII simulator more than once - and generally had a good time for one summer.

I did not go on to become a pilot as other things interested me the next year and thereafter; but, I was on the right path if I had wanted too. I always assumed that I could get a private pilots license later when I had the time and resources. For the last decade I believe that I would no longer meet the medical requirements. Oh well, there are other things in life to enjoy.

My advice - check it out and pursue it if you desire it.


User currently offlineKeesje From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8441 times:

Being stable, predictable and exact improves your chances. Unlike being creative, willing to take risks and an innovator.

 stirthepot 


User currently offlineKhobar From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2379 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8409 times:



Quoting NKMCO (Reply 11):
I was lucky - got a great 172P (1983) with low engine hours (300 SMOH) since I bought it from a flight school that needed money (pretty bad apparently). Real cost - $3.60 for a gallon of 100LL (burns about 6-8 GPH), tie-down is $85 a month, insurance $950 a year, maintenance guy for $40 per hour when something is needed...

Thanks for the info! Very interesting.


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10725 posts, RR: 38
Reply 15, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8274 times:

I always wished to be an airline pilot when I was your age. Concorde was not around yet at that time. She came not much later.

Only that I did not have the right family for it. They were very old fashioned. A career plan for a woman was something not to be considered. A woman's career was to be in the home with children.

Planes were OK to go see and use but a career flying planes was not even imaginable. My love for planes never dissipated since but I could not go for the job.

All I can say to you is "go for it"! Dream your dream, make it turn into reality and live it!!!

Maybe you can look at the RAF Air Cadets program? I believe it is very tough and very demanding. This is the RAF, very prestigious. Then when you are done with them I am sure any airline in the UK will be thrilled to have you with them.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineSpeedBirdA380 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2008, 539 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 8025 times:



Quoting TiktokJAKE (Thread starter):
What qualification do I need and What training courses should I go on??

As someone said before make sure you do well in your GCSE's and A-levels,particually physics and maths. There are, I think really three main ways to become an airline pilot:

1. Do well with your education and then pay to go on an ATPL course at the mentioned flight schools.

2. The military route. Join and serve in the RAF etc....

3. Airline cadet sponsorship programme (Unfortunatley do not seem to be available any more though,read below)

Quoting SandroZRH (Reply 2):
Are there no airline sponsored cadet programs in the UK?

The airline cadet programmes seem to have all but stopped in the UK for some reason. I remember in 1998-2000 when I was doing my GCSE's and A-levels there were many airline sponsorship schemes with British Airways,Virgin Atlantic and Easyjet etc........but go on their recruitment webpages now and its all stopped for some reason.


Sadly I have not yet been able to fulfill my dream to become a pilot....circumstances change, finances,hopefully one day though....

My advice to you though is make sure you are really serious and its really what you want to do,especially if your parents are going to be forking out money like £80k for your course. Everyone thinks being a pilot is a dream job (and dont get me wrong,it is for most people who the job) but there are quite a lot of pilots out there who dont really enjoy there job - I know one of them.

There are lots of great books and dvds out there. I would recommend "From the flightdeck - B747-400 LHR-HKG" as a good read and can be brought online. ITVV also do some excellent documetries from the flightdeck.

Good luck with your goals but dont be too hasty is my advice..you have a few years to decide yet. Why not take a lesson or ride in a cessna? - see how you like it.


User currently offlineRoyalAirMaroc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 7567 times:

You do not need A levels to become a pilot. Nor do you need A levels in Maths and Physics. You need a base minimum of 5 GCSE Passes (A-C) including Math, Science, Physics (or Additional Science), and English.

However, Most airlines do prefer A levels but these are not mandatory. E.g A while back, a student from OAA who had only GCSE's got a place at BA.

The most important aspect of gaining a job after graduating from a Flight School are Flight Test Results (from the School) and Academic Achievement.

To sum up, Almost everyone you will bump into will reccomend taking A levels. This will leave you with an exit route should things go sour. i.e you could go to uni.



Life is a Journey, One Which I hope will include alot of Flights !! =]
User currently offlineC680 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 580 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 7512 times:

Step 1)

Get a good general education from a liberal arts university.


Step 2)

Spend 5 years working on creating the next Google, or Facebook, or YouTube.

Step 3)

Retire young and rich.

Step 4)

Buy your own airliner and fly it whenever and wherever you wish.

Message here: there is more than one path to get where you want to be.



My happy place is FL470 - what's yours?
User currently offlineNKMCO From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 96 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 7378 times:



Quoting Khobar (Reply 14):
Thanks for the info! Very interesting.

Also, I bought a plane with a friend of mine so all the fixed costs are split in half. I spoke to a lot of pilots and this seems to be the cheapest way to go (rather then put yourself in debt for $70k flight school and pay it off for next 15 years)...

If you do end up doing something like this, make sure to for a LLC (Limited Liability Company) so in case you want to add a co-owner it would be just a matter of adding that person as a member of LLC.

Good luck!


User currently offlineBrettdespain From United States of America, joined May 2005, 178 posts, RR: 11
Reply 20, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6206 times:



Quoting C680 (Reply 18):
Step 1)

Get a good general education from a liberal arts university.


Step 2)

Spend 5 years working on creating the next Google, or Facebook, or YouTube.

Step 3)

Retire young and rich.

Step 4)

Buy your own airliner and fly it whenever and wherever you wish.

LOL! Spoken like a true pilot. I love being an airline pilot, but sometimes I wish I would have followed your steps. I surely would have made a ton more money!

Quoting C680 (Reply 18):
Message here: there is more than one path to get where you want to be.

Amen brother!



V1...Rotate.
User currently offlineVScaptain From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 107 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks ago) and read 5813 times:

Hi there,

Pretty much have had your answer allready, but one thing that hasnt been mentioned is the ATC.

The Air Tranning Core have squadrons all around the country, you can join at 13, but must be enrolled by your 18th birthday. The core can give you so so much including free flying in grob tutors from your nearest RAF AEF base, free gliding at VGS squadrons, with the chance to gain scholarships in both areas. Also parachuting, sky diving, sailing, sports, D of E, cams at RAF bases globally, RAF Carears advice, qualifications in Aviaition Studies and BTEC in uniformed public services. All uniform is provided, both S95, Working and wedgewood blues. You have chance to be promoted through ranks, and progess in classification.

PM me for more info, you may be able to guess I am a cadet myself. (Flight Sergeant awaiting CWO interview, so I have been there a while).

My dream is similar to yours. PM me for advice or add me on MSN or something. We shall chat.

Ash



AP321 - Oxford Aviation Academy
User currently onlineTupolevTu154 From Germany, joined Aug 2004, 2174 posts, RR: 28
Reply 22, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks ago) and read 5690 times:

Quoting 2175301 (Reply 12):
And, start hanging around a nearby airport with private planes, meet the owners and pilots, help out, etc. When i was your age I hung around - got invited along on some day flying - joined the CAP (Civil Air Patrol), "crashed" the WWII simulator more than once - and generally had a good time for one summer.

I did not go on to become a pilot as other things interested me the next year and thereafter; but, I was on the right path if I had wanted too. I always assumed that I could get a private pilots license later when I had the time and resources. For the last decade I believe that I would no longer meet the medical requirements. Oh well, there are other things in life to enjoy.

My advice - check it out and pursue it if you desire it.

I was totally focused on becoming a pilot, got 14 hours towards a PPL, went to get a medical then my dreams were ruined from thereafter. I'm only capable of getting a class 2 medical, not enough to fly commercially. After this I gave up on the PPL (money issues also contributed to this decision) and had a look at gliding instead, alot cheaper and just as much fun, if not more!

I also went to a local grass strip, and have got to know the gent who owns the place and a couple of aircraft, as well as others that keep their aircraft at the field. Since going there I have had some fantastic opportunities all free and out of good will in exchange for some assistance with maintenance and various other bits from me. I've learned alot from these pilots I have met and am so glad I went and found the place!

Since I've been going there I have had three hours of flights in a Yak 52, doing some awesome aerobatics etc, being the "first officer" in a Beech Baron across to Lelystad in Holland and back, multiple flights in a Piper Clipper and a cross country flight in a Piper Comanche and a nice local flight in a Tiger Moth. All for free. A bit of hard work but learning at the same time is great and is more than paid off with all these opportunities. I think most of all I'm grateful that the pilots I've flown with are trustworthy enough to put their aircraft in the hands of a 17 year old, from simple things like flicking switches to radio-comms, navigation, and even aerobatics, approaches and landings.

A bit of a long winded post but I feel I've had so many opportunities in the aviation world and met so many great like-minded people by just being outgoing and asking questions. As soon as you tell them how interested you are it gets you a long way!

As for my career in aviation, my eyesight bars be from entering the RAF (which I aimed my life around for 4 or so years) or any other flying role. I think ground staff is something I'll have to do instead!

Last but not least - keep an open mind, and take what you can get.

Quoting VScaptain (Reply 22):
The Air Tranning Core have squadrons all around the country, you can join at 13, but must be enrolled by your 18th birthday. The core can give you so so much including free flying in grob tutors from your nearest RAF AEF base, free gliding at VGS squadrons, with the chance to gain scholarships in both areas. Also parachuting, sky diving, sailing, sports, D of E, cams at RAF bases globally, RAF Carears advice, qualifications in Aviaition Studies and BTEC in uniformed public services. All uniform is provided, both S95, Working and wedgewood blues. You have chance to be promoted through ranks, and progess in classification.

I'm in the Air Training Corps too and have been for four years. It's something definitely worth doing. I have almost four hours flying in Grob Tutors from RAF Benson (most of those involving aerobatics, and one navigation exercise), a gliding scholarship at RAF Syerston and very nearly got a flight aboard a King Air from RAF Cranwell. I've been on camps to RAF Valley (up close and personal with Hawks!) and RAF Uxbridge. Away from the flying side of things I've got awards for Aircraft Recognition at a regional level, and been in our squadron's drill team for three years. The past two years we've come second at Corps level for drill and have the best uniform in the country for these two years too. Shooting is also great fun, and you can do this on .22 or L98's.

The ATC takes dedication to get anywhere but it's worth it and looks fantastic on your CV! I'm immensely proud of everything I've done in the corps (as you can see from my ego-boosting paragraph up there!).

Good Luck!

[Edited 2009-06-08 10:03:46]


Atheists - Winning since 33 A.D.
User currently offlineTheginge From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 1126 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (4 years 10 months 2 weeks ago) and read 5572 times:

Maths and Physics are not so important for A levels these days. I would say you could get in to a good Airline without them if you are good enough and have good grades in other subjects.

Also consider going to University. Getting in to an airline is very competitive, especially one such as BA, so a degree can help no end. But that said there are many pilots who are in good positions without a degree.

And be aware these days airlines not only look for people who will be good pilots, you need to be a good all rounder, a good manager. As ultimatly the pilots are 'managing' the flight. And getting in to a large airline that is often a key factor.


User currently offlineRJ111 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (4 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 4967 times:

What you need (in order of importance)...


Money
Luck
Determination
Skill


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