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Bigger Seats For Fat People?  
User currently offlineMasseyBrown From United States of America, joined Dec 2002, 5600 posts, RR: 7
Posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 9516 times:

Yesterday's WSJ discussed the possibility of charging 150% of the ticket price for a seat 50% larger to accommodate fat people who resent paying twice the fare for two seats. Apparently this interesting and perhaps equitable idea, based on replacing 6-abreast with 4 or 5, is being considered by UA and possibly others.

It's easy to see problems, though. It would probably undermine regular 1st class business. Then, why should just the fat enjoy the privilege? People would be faking fat, wearing padded clothes to get the space.

The issue does point out the fact that on a long full flight economy is torture and the front cabin is extortion. Maybe BA's version of premium economy is the answer for the fat problem.

[Edited 2009-06-10 08:43:09]


I love long German words like 'Freundschaftsbezeigungen'.
89 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineOzarkD9S From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5225 posts, RR: 21
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 9485 times:



Quoting MasseyBrown (Thread starter):


It's easy to see problems, though. It would probably undermine regular 1st class business. Then, why should just the fat enjoy the privilege? People would be faking fat, wearing padded clothes to get the space.

Why even go to that much trouble? If I was willing to pay for the extra room, and I'm an average sized guy, then I should be able to book the seat. Will people have to prove their obesity before being able to book those seats? How would that work?



The best IFE: A window seat and a good book.
User currently offlineKhobar From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2379 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9392 times:



Quoting MasseyBrown (Thread starter):
It's easy to see problems, though. It would probably undermine regular 1st class business. Then, why should just the fat enjoy the privilege? People would be faking fat, wearing padded clothes to get the space.



Quoting OzarkD9S (Reply 1):
Why even go to that much trouble? If I was willing to pay for the extra room, and I'm an average sized guy, then I should be able to book the seat. Will people have to prove their obesity before being able to book those seats? How would that work?

Many airlines have added "real" premium economy seating because there's a market for it. I seem to recall UA's idea of premium economy is bulk-head seats with more leg room and nothing more.


User currently offlineRwSEA From Netherlands, joined Jan 2005, 3135 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9382 times:

There's usually the option of first class... I would assume that would take care of the issue. I realize that it's expensive, but when one makes the choice to be significantly overweight, uncomfortable air travel is an unfortunate consequence.

Quoting MasseyBrown (Thread starter):
The issue does point out the fact that on a long full flight economy is torture and the front cabin is extortion. Maybe BA's version of premium economy is the answer for the fat problem.

I agree that long-haul premium classes are outrageous... I agree that premium economy products are a good choice.


User currently offlineDirectorguy From Egypt, joined Jul 2008, 1708 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9352 times:



Quoting RwSEA (Reply 3):
There's usually the option of first class... I would assume that would take care of the issue. I realize that it's expensive, but when one makes the choice to be significantly overweight, uncomfortable air travel is an unfortunate consequence

People don't make the 'choice' of being overweight. Sure, people have the option of losing weight but easier said than done and besides, it's not the kind of choice you make or undo by pushing some sort of button.


User currently offlineReadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3360 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9322 times:



Quoting OzarkD9S (Reply 1):
Will people have to prove their obesity before being able to book those seats? How would that work?

Or 50% reduction for Anorexia?  no 



you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
User currently offlineScipio From Belgium, joined Oct 2007, 926 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9277 times:



Quoting MasseyBrown (Thread starter):
The issue does point out the fact that on a long full flight economy is torture and the front cabin is extortion. Maybe BA's version of premium economy is the answer for the fat problem.

Interestingly, the A350 seems to be sized to allow for both 9-abreast ordinary economy class, and 8-abreast premium economy. Although a bit less optimal, a mixed 8/9-abreast layout would also work in the B787.


User currently offlineEA772LR From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2836 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9255 times:

I think if the airlines need to use a seat that is 50% larger to accommodate larger people, then the ticket price has to go up correspondingly 50%. If an obese person has to use 2 seats, they sure as hell should have to pay for the extra seat. Why should the airlines suffer because someone is larger than average and needs 2 seats?

Quoting Directorguy (Reply 4):
People don't make the 'choice' of being overweight.

Oh yes they do. It's called over eating, and it's something us Americans do far too often. Having a doctor as a brother, I can tell you only a very small handful of obese people are obese because of medical issues like a dysfunctional, or rather, non-functional thyroid. The vast majority of fat people are fat because they have chosen to continuously over eat, or eat the wrong things. Having been hefty myself early in my childhood, I had to consciously back away from the food, and exercise to become fit.

I think I'll write a book charting my journey on going from fat to fit, and it will be 2 pages...it will say EAT RIGHT, EXERCISE RIGHT  Wink



We often judge others by their actions, but ourselves by our intentions.
User currently offlineMasseyBrown From United States of America, joined Dec 2002, 5600 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9245 times:



Quoting Khobar (Reply 2):
I seem to recall UA's idea of premium economy is bulk-head seats with more leg room and nothing more.

I agree that UA's version of premium economy is not worth the extra cost; that's why I suggested BA's - which is close to the 1970's original concept for business class: somewhat more space, somewhat better food, and no tourists for about 15% over Y fares. It might also offer fat people a better deal than twice the Y fare would.



I love long German words like 'Freundschaftsbezeigungen'.
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31402 posts, RR: 85
Reply 9, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 9162 times:
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Quoting Scipio (Reply 6):
Interestingly, the A350 seems to be sized to allow for both 9-abreast ordinary economy class, and 8-abreast premium economy. Although a bit less optimal, a mixed 8/9-abreast layout would also work in the B787.

I still remain unconvinced that people will notice the extra 7mm width an A350XWB seat will provide at 9-abreast over a 787.

Then again, maybe A350XWB operators can charge an extra 1.7% for that 1.7% extra width.  Wink


User currently offlineFrmrCAPCADET From United States of America, joined May 2008, 1741 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 9108 times:



Quoting Scipio (Reply 6):
Interestingly, the A350 seems to be sized to allow for both 9-abreast ordinary economy class, and 8-abreast premium economy. Although a bit less optimal, a mixed 8/9-abreast layout would also work in the B787.

And why they are at it why not offer 3-5 inches more pitch on some of those seats. And prices ought to be based on the amount of 'realestate' used. Airliners are space limited, not weight limited.

And it is none of our business how or why someone is overweight, experts themselves are not decided on the issue. This is not a health/weight blog. It is our business that no one take up someone elses' space.



Buffet: the airline business...has eaten up capital...like..no other (business)
User currently offlineScipio From Belgium, joined Oct 2007, 926 posts, RR: 10
Reply 11, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9036 times:



Quoting Stitch (Reply 9):
I still remain unconvinced that people will notice the extra 7mm width an A350XWB seat will provide at 9-abreast over a 787.

Then again, maybe A350XWB operators can charge an extra 1.7% for that 1.7% extra width.

 Smile

I thought it was a bit more than 7 mm, though.

In any case, the A350 was designed from the start as an 8/9 seater, whereas the B787 was initially intended to be an 8-abreast plane. That is the only point I tried to make.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 20336 posts, RR: 59
Reply 12, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9009 times:



Quoting MasseyBrown (Thread starter):

The issue does point out the fact that on a long full flight economy is torture and the front cabin is extortion. Maybe BA's version of premium economy is the answer for the fat problem.

Here's what I don't get. My boyfriend is 6'4". If he wants an exit row seat, he has to pay for it. If he wants to fly F-class or any other seat with more room, he has to pay for it.

Now, you can argue that being fat is a choice or isn't a choice. As a formerly obese person, I'd argue that it is partly a choice. It is very difficult to stop being obese, but not impossible. Nobody chooses to get fat, but people can choose to not be fat anymore. It's just a *huge* commitment.

On the other hand, you CAN'T argue that height is a choice.


User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31402 posts, RR: 85
Reply 13, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 8978 times:
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Quoting Scipio (Reply 11):
I thought it was a bit more than 7 mm, though.

Per Airbus and Boeing's own figures, in a nine-abreast configuration seat cushion width is:

A350XWB - ~444mm
787 - ~437mm

The A350XWB will have a bit more shoulder room (I believe 25-50mm has been bandied about in this forum) at the windows due to straighter sidewalls from the larger fuselage diameter, though airlines might instead push the seat closer to the wall to open up the aisles.


User currently offlineManhattanbeach From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 8960 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 12):
Here's what I don't get. My boyfriend is 6'4".

Lucky you !

Anyway, I think its terrible. What would it be called..'fat class' ?

I love flying but I don't think it's ever been healthy to expect someone to sit in that amount of space for anything upto 15 hours at a time. (economy)


User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8865 times:



Quoting RwSEA (Reply 3):
but when one makes the choice to be significantly overweight

And what happens when one doesn't have the choice to be........you seem to be assuming quite a lot? Can you then explain why someone who has a medical condition which causes it would, by your comments, be treated differently from someone with say, Diabetes or anything else?

Quoting EA772LR (Reply 7):
Why should the airlines suffer because someone is larger than average and needs 2 seats?

Then equally, and by the same definition, why should airlines be responsible for someone who is taller than average and needs extra legroom.......are you similarly proposing they must book in J or F?

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 12):
Now, you can argue that being fat is a choice or isn't a choice. As a formerly obese person, I'd argue that it is partly a choice. It is very difficult to stop being obese, but not impossible. Nobody chooses to get fat, but people can choose to not be fat anymore. It's just a *huge* commitment.

On the other hand, you CAN'T argue that height is a choice.

However, and surely yourself as a physician, you can also argue that if a medical condition is involved it's a little bit more complicated than a mere "huge commitment".

Quoting Manhattanbeach (Reply 14):
I love flying but I don't think it's ever been healthy to expect someone to sit in that amount of space for anything upto 15 hours at a time. (economy)

No-one is expecting them to, nor is it necessary. It's only on a,net that the fallacy exists that everyone wants to fly 15 hours non-stop. Phoooooy!


User currently offlinePlanesarecool From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2001, 4124 posts, RR: 11
Reply 16, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8825 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 12):
On the other hand, you CAN'T argue that height is a choice.

Im 6'5, if somebody is obese and doesn't expect to pay for a second seat, surely I shouldn't expect to pay for extra legroom?

Quoting Directorguy (Reply 4):
People don't make the 'choice' of being overweight.

Yes they do, when they reach for that extra piece of pie. Yes there are medical reasons for being obese, I have a family member with underactive thyroid, but even she has managed to lose weight and is no longer regarded as overweight.


User currently offlineDirectorguy From Egypt, joined Jul 2008, 1708 posts, RR: 11
Reply 17, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8823 times:



Quoting EA772LR (Reply 7):
Oh yes they do. It's called over eating, and it's something us Americans do far too often. Having a doctor as a brother, I can tell you only a very small handful of obese people are obese because of medical issues like a dysfunctional, or rather, non-functional thyroid. The vast majority of fat people are fat because they have chosen to continuously over eat, or eat the wrong things. Having been hefty myself early in my childhood, I had to consciously back away from the food, and exercise to become fit.

I think I'll write a book charting my journey on going from fat to fit, and it will be 2 pages...it will say EAT RIGHT, EXERCISE RIGHT

What about people with depression who eat uncontrollably, or people who had no access to nutritional advice, or people who don't have much time to exercise? In many cases, it's like a quagmire effect-you can't help it.
It would be an interesting debate, but although it's great that you overcome your problems early on, many people aren't as lucky I'm afraid.


User currently offlineTrigged From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 540 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8779 times:



Quoting Directorguy (Reply 17):
What about people with depression who eat uncontrollably, or people who had no access to nutritional advice, or people who don't have much time to exercise? In many cases, it's like a quagmire effect-you can't help it.
It would be an interesting debate, but although it's great that you overcome your problems early on, many people aren't as lucky I'm afraid.

If a person has the monetary capability to purchase a ticket with an airline, then they more than likely understand that overeating and under-exercising causes weight gain. This is analogous to the "people don't understand how you get AIDS" argument. Please find a single person who does not know how you get AIDS or get fat. If you do find one, then I can say with some certainty that they will probably not have enough money to pay for a ticket anywhere on any airline. As for persons who have mental issues that cause obesity, it is still a personal choice. If they are so mentally incapacitated that they are not cognizant of their actions, I am not sure I want them seated next to me, regardless of their physical size.

Does this sound harsh and brutal? Maybe, but I just get tired of the "everyone is a victim" mentality. If you do something that affects others, then you must pay for those actions, good or bad.


User currently offlineEA772LR From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2836 posts, RR: 10
Reply 19, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8736 times:



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 15):
Then equally, and by the same definition, why should airlines be responsible for someone who is taller than average and needs extra legroom.......are you similarly proposing they must book in J or F?

No but airlines go by the average. It's not their job, nor is it feasible to cater seat sizes with the differences in human body types. Most passengers don't need extra leg room because of height or extra seat width because they are over weight.

Quoting Directorguy (Reply 17):
What about people with depression who eat uncontrollably, or people who had no access to nutritional advice, or people who don't have much time to exercise? In many cases, it's like a quagmire effect-you can't help it.
It would be an interesting debate, but although it's great that you overcome your problems early on, many people aren't as lucky I'm afraid.

Thank you, and you are correct, I did live in an environment conducive to losing weight (Neither parent was over weight, no history of medical problems, etc.). I may seem somewhat not compassionate on this issue, but it seems like in the case of those who are over weight, I think many times, as DocLightning pointed out, it's a matter of will power. I think many people like to play the victim role and not assume responsibility for their actions. (over eating)



We often judge others by their actions, but ourselves by our intentions.
User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6537 posts, RR: 54
Reply 20, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8725 times:

Some years back CPH had a historic section on their web site. On that site there was a picture taken back in the 1920'es inside the terminal building showing a lady standing on a scale.

The reason was that at that time passengers paid per lb body weight.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineFLFlyGuy From United States of America, joined May 2004, 244 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8694 times:
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If airlines do begin installing special seats for overweight people, and charge extra for it, I think that hand in hand with that should be that people in those seats get NO FOOD !

Just kidding....I think....



The views expressed are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 8647 times:



Quoting MasseyBrown (Thread starter):
perhaps equitable idea

I don't see anything equitable in this. It's like handicap parking. 99% of the people I see using those damned spots walk just fine and are perfectly mobile. It's stupid.

Quoting MasseyBrown (Thread starter):
Then, why should just the fat enjoy the privilege?

What they should do is cough up the extra cash for 1st class. And if they're flying a single class airline like WN then sucks to be them.

Too many times I've been stuck in between two whales.  crowded  And I hardly take up any space at 5' 10" and 140lbs. I don't see why I should be inconvenienced when they're to cheap to pay up for bigger seats in J or F.


User currently offlineDaBuzzard From Canada, joined Sep 2007, 136 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 8613 times:



Quoting Prebennorholm (Reply 20):
Some years back CPH had a historic section on their web site. On that site there was a picture taken back in the 1920'es inside the terminal building showing a lady standing on a scale.

The reason was that at that time passengers paid per lb body weight.

Expect that you will find that the aircraft being used were far closer to max weight and far easier to get the cg out of limits. Same applies loading a small aircraft today, you need to know what everything weighs and where it to get an accurate weight and balance.

And to the OP - I beleive that the "pc" term would be Gravitationaly Challanged, not fat  Wink


User currently offlineBeeweel15 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 1796 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 8358 times:

The bottom line folks , and coming from a big person myself, whether you are fat thin or in between if you want more room pay for it.

My advice is to research your flights and see which flights have the least pax and book that one even if it is not the time you want but at least you will get to your destination comfortable. There are many thin folks here who have flown in packed Y class flights and said to them selves why i did not buy that seat next to me.


25 Baalzebub : As a really fat person, I don't think weight is that much of a problem in airplanes. The only problem is, the seatbelt doesn't big enough sometime. It
26 EA772LR : Hey my girlfriend is Turkish...and can I say you have some of the most beautiful women in Turkey Ok, back on topic, I agree that charging extra for a
27 FLY2HMO : I could say something that would probably offend all of you that share your condition , but I guess the politically correct sentence I'm looking for
28 AirframeAS : I'd be very careful about that statement, Doc. Obviously, you have never met my ex-girlfriend's sister. She is larger than a beached whale, who never
29 RiddlePilot215 : Perhaps the airlines could save their time and money on installing "fat people" seats, and just focus their time and efforts on improving their produc
30 AirframeAS : In defense of the airlines, I have to ask: How are the airlines going to pay for it and who is going to pay to have them installed? It won't solve an
31 RiddlePilot215 : Oh, I was already in defense for the airlines. I just don't see this whole "fat seats" thing panning out. It's stupid, you're basically rewarding peo
32 Mir : Explain the logic underlying those conclusions, please. Because I'm having a hard time believing either. Some people don't. But a lot of people do. F
33 KL911 : Oh yes, Fastfood, no sport, driving a car instead of cycling or walking to a shop, etc etc...
34 Blackbird1331 : Change the size of the doors. If you cannot fit through the door then you cannot fly.
35 GFFgold : I'm not what you would call fat but I'm of an age where cramped long-haul accomodation takes more out of me than it used to. I'm all in favour of a pr
36 Profcalvin : Finnaly, something good about being fat No, just kidding. Heck I'm 14 and only weigh about a 100lbs. It would be really interesting to see though what
37 EA772LR : Your dad does bring up an interesting point though. If you're gonna charge me (5'9" 160lbs) for having a 100lb bag, then why not charge a person who
38 Mir : They actually don't. Both an overweight bag and overweight person cost extra fuel, but the bag has to be handled by the ramp staff (more work for the
39 WarRI1 : Two weeks ago, I flew to Chicago, on United. There was a huge man who was moved to first class so he could fit. (A319) The manager came out to make th
40 FLY2HMO : I think we should all be priced just like cargo. I mean heck most airlines treat pax little more than cargo nowadays as it is (mind you, I still say t
41 Profcalvin : Yup, Sorry. Totally forgot about the poor ramp staff that have to haul those really heavy bags so I guess an extra charge on heavy bags is more reaso
42 FuturePilot16 : Well, although it is a lifestyle choice for most to weigh 300 lbs, people also make decisions to pack unnecessary amounts of junk when going somewher
43 MasseyBrown : Does the difficulty of sitting more or less immobilized in a 17x31 inch space immediately next to similar unfortunates for several hours really need
44 Mir : Which is actually pretty much negligible. But the difference between an overweight bag and a normal bag is not - that's weight that could be used for
45 Pellegrine : I've long ago drawn up a solution to this problem. 737s and A320s are 6 abreast in normal economy. So, in the last row of the airplane special "extra
46 RB211 : I don't think it's any more different than a tall person needing extra room. If you need more room, then pay for it. What's not fair is making the tr
47 Manhattanbeach : Well if you're going to nit-pick. I said upto 15 hours. Anything over 6 sucks in economy.
48 Enginebird : Excellent contribution!!! Because you should know -- if you had paid attention in your statistics class -- that about 40-49% of the population are by
49 Vfw614 : I don't think so - only the maths are done differently. With some people getting fatter and fatter, airlines had/have to adjust their calculations of
50 Kmz : Maybe we should avoid discussing why people are fat since this is an aviation forum and not a medical forum. In my opinion the important question is n
51 Jonjonnl : KLM will assign exit row seats to their tall customers. It makes sense especially because we're a nation of really tall people.
52 LH526 : How can this be discrimination? When you are fat and stuck in a middle seat of a tripple using more than half of the armrest and thus harrasing the o
53 LH526 : If Airlines give larger seats free of charge to fat people, than in logical consequence they should give larger seats to tall people, and this turns i
54 Post contains links Imberry : I believe that this issue was litigated in Canada last year - http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssAirlines/idUSN2039776920081120 0 - with the Canadian
55 EA772LR : You're kidding right? Believe me I paid attention in class. I do not believe that just because someone has no self-control when it comes to food, the
56 Manhattanbeach : That's hilarious but quite logical at the same time.
57 JFernandez : I'm 5'10 and 320, but luckily I fit okay into a coach seat, but I have to admit, my shoulders are a bigger problem than my stomach, I find. That being
58 EA772LR : Oh hell yeah we'd be a lot more comfortable, but ticket prices would have to go up to cover the loss in revenue from the significant drop in the numb
59 Mir : It probably wouldn't be, since they'd pass on the cost to the rest of the passengers. If an airline is going to have an extra wide seat, then they ne
60 RB211 : I wonder if Greyhound has this same problem.....
61 Ncfc99 : Whilst I have sympathy for people who are medically overweight, I still have trouble being on the end of seat sharing with them. I have paid for a se
62 Wukka : Wow. Some of you people are quite harsh. Sickening actually. I used to think that Ralph Nader and his propensity to go after airlines and seat pitch,
63 EA772LR : Save the self-righteousness seriously. Who said anything about tall people?? This thread is about overweight people, and if airlines should install l
64 NWADC9 : Charging people who spill over to more than one seat should be charged! You're ticket is good for ONE seat, not one and a half. If I pay for my seat,
65 LH526 : That's what we do, but not to avoid fat people, but to enjoy the space and comfort we pay for. In the end, who's repsonsibility is the whole issue? W
66 Khobar : Yup - I'd love to see a premium economy with, I dunno, 34"-36" pitch, and 2x3 instead of 3x3 seating. A lot of stores charge extra for 2X and 3X size
67 Enginebird : You are not making sense. You do not read other people's comments because you are not interested in what they have to say, no matter how reasonable i
68 AvConsultant : It's not picking on fat people. They have an increase in fuel burn compared to an averaged sized person. In the United States a lot of people make th
69 JoeCanuck : Regardless of whether or not fatness is a choice; to fly is. Airlines should be under no obligation to cater to the extremes of size, in either axis.
70 LH526 : or worse .... make the neighbouring pax suffer! My words exactly, see above!
71 JoeCanuck : Hahahaha...that's a hoot...and I used the Mini too..., though the later version. It wasn't plagiarism, it was laziness. If I read too many posts, my
72 AvConsultant : Exactly, I am having trouble understanding when a new tax idea is tossed around why is it the airline industry being targeted? It's crazy to me. They
73 Viscount724 : It's evern more ridiculous since the requirement only applies on domestic routes. To the US or on any other international routes, AC charges for an e
74 LH526 : No pun intended I was just happy to see that some minds think alike! I totally agree to your points that sound so much better in proper english!
75 AT : But you are assuming that anyone who is overweight WANTS more room or is looking for an upgrade. Often times the problem is that they cannot fit into
76 LH526 : Right, good point, so when a fat person is simply too fat and poses a safety threat for himself and others, what would be the procedure? The easiest
77 Mir : Then they can pay for the extra room, be it a wider seat or two seats. Not to beat this topic to death, but: there is a difference between an injury
78 JoeCanuck : Did the airline break their leg?
79 XJETFlyer : It drives me nuts that the airlines spend so much time on this crap. I'm 6'6 and I want more leg room or the exit row! Airlines refuse to cater to my
80 AT : For lots of moderately overweight people, sure, may be there is a choice component, but for those who are morbidly obese--- i.e., the people most lik
81 FrmrCAPCADET : But the basic problem is that Y is deliberately uncomfortable, so that First and Business and Economy Plus folks won't be tempted to downgrade. My con
82 EA772LR : No I hear you loud and clear , perhaps you didn't read the thread title... It's about bigger seats for Fat people, not tall people. I said nothing ab
83 474218 : They my walk just fine but they could be like my son. He had a hip replacement, since the artificial hip only last 20 to 25 years (and he is only 39)
84 Mir : So are you of the mindset that tall people should be afforded seats with extra legroom at the airline's expense? Y is cramped because the airlines ha
85 FrmrCAPCADET : Perhaps you haven't noticed that to some degree all customers are considered a nuisance.
86 DocLightning : The two major causes of obesity that I can come up with are Cushing's syndrome/disease and hypothyroidism. Both are treatable. There are a very few (
87 Crjfixer : EXACTLY! You would not believe what this would cost to do to 1 aircraft much less a whole fleet. 1 set of seats (2 seats) for a crj is around $8,000
88 ThirtyEcho : So, about 40% of the American public is obese and it is due to glands or heredity or blah-de-blah? Hogwash. In the DC-3 days, your luggage was weighed
89 Enginebird : I know, but the logic is similar and I take issue with your repeated comments that airlines should not have to provide acceptable service for people
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First Class Seats For Less posted Wed May 16 2007 04:32:24 by Medic2366
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Lie Flat Business Seats For Swiss A330 posted Sat Nov 11 2006 15:17:00 by BOAC911
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New Business Class Seats For Swiss 330s? posted Fri Aug 4 2006 15:49:38 by BOAC911