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Any Scheduled Operations Passing South Of 60°S?  
User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4575 posts, RR: 41
Posted (5 years 6 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2653 times:

I know there are numerous scheduled operations which fly in the Arctic region. I'm wondering if there are any regular, scheduled air operations which fly south of 60°S at any stage of their flight? I'm not talking about Antarctic charters here, but regular scheduled operations which fly through these extreme southern latitudes.

V/F


"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNZ107 From New Zealand, joined Jul 2005, 6456 posts, RR: 38
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2613 times:

I wouldn't be surprised if the AR A342 routing from AKL-EZE or QF's 744 SYD-EZE come close to that but I'm not sure if it actually crosses that latitude. They're the only 2 that come into mind.


It's all about the destination AND the journey.
User currently offlineGeo772 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2004, 519 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2532 times:

The direct routing of AKL-EZE won't go near 60S, however the SYD-EZE run will go pretty close.

Having a further look at prospective routes from South America to Australia, EZE-PER would go almost over the pole, however given current regulations could only be performed by a 3 or 4 engine aircraft (even when 330min ETOPS comes along). It really shows the South pole is a long way from anywhere.



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User currently offlinePawsleykat From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1978 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2448 times:



Quoting Geo772 (Reply 2):
however the SYD-EZE run will go pretty close

I just had a look at Google Earth, and drew a direct line between SYD and EZE. It showed that (when the cursor was moved over the line) at the closest point to Antarctica it was 69ºS, so that route not only goes near 60ºS, but crosses over at two points  Smile

JG  Yeah sure



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User currently offlineQm001 From Portugal, joined Mar 2004, 282 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2338 times:

Hi all,

I believe that the QF (and previously SA also) service SYD-JNB and/or MEL-JNB also crossed that line.

Rgds,

QM001 (167 Air Malawi)



I wish there was still a flying boat service on the African Lakes!
User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4575 posts, RR: 41
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2288 times:



Quoting Geo772 (Reply 2):
given current regulations could only be performed by a 3 or 4 engine aircraft (even when 330min ETOPS comes along).

Australian regulations no longer put an absolute upper limit on how far a twin engine aircraft may operate from a diversion airfield - see Which NAAs No Longer Restrict Twin-engine EDTOs? (by VirginFlyer Jun 16 2009 in Tech Ops)

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineTimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6902 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 months 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2013 times:



Quoting Geo772 (Reply 2):
could only be performed by a 3 or 4 engine aircraft (even when 330min ETOPS comes along).

Maybe the shortest route is more than 330 minutes at some point, but that doesn't mean a twin couldn't do it. The necessary dogleg to stay within 330 likely wouldn't be prohibitive.


User currently offlineGeo772 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2004, 519 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1828 times:



Quoting Timz (Reply 6):
Maybe the shortest route is more than 330 minutes at some point, but that doesn't mean a twin couldn't do it. The necessary dogleg to stay within 330 likely wouldn't be prohibitive

Looking again at my map, the dogleg would be quite prohibitive, the main reasons being is that the alternates are in South America or Australia, with nothing in between. As a result if you were to put a dogleg in it would take you towards South Africa and when you do that the aircraft just won't have the legs to do the route.



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