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Enschede Airport (NL) Te Become A Regional Airport  
User currently offlineJoost From Netherlands, joined Apr 2005, 3158 posts, RR: 4
Posted (5 years 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 2876 times:

After a long political debate, the Dutch regional and national government have decided to keep Enschede Airport Twente (ENS) open and to develop it into a small regional airport for civil aviation. The design capacity of the airport will be 1.5M pax/year.

Enschede has been a military airfield since 2007. In 2005, the last F16 squadron was moved to Volkel (EHVK) but the airport remained in use for maintenance activities for the military. In december 2007 the air force completely left the airport.

When the airport was still in use as a military airfield, there was some civil traffic too. Transavia and other charter carriers used to operate flights to the airport until 2005, typically 1-2 daily flights to Turkey or Spain during the summer season. Since the military left, this stopped, as the air force provided ATC, Fire fighters, etc.

A longer time ago, there were even scheduled flights to AMS, operated by the likes of NLM Cityhopper and many other regional carriers.

Since 2005 the airport has been subject to political discussions, whether to keep it as an airport or to close it and use it for residential areas and nature. Today, it was finally decided to keep the airport open.

The region stresses the importance of the airport for the region. Within the direct vicinity of the airport, you can find cities like Enschede, Hengelo and Almelo. The Twente region is home to about 600.000 inhabitants, the catchment area of the airport is a bit larger, though. The airport competes with FMO, DTM, AMS, NRN and EIN.

The reconstruction of the airport is supposed to be finished in 2011. I expect flights by HV, FR and charter airlines, very similar to the network presently operated at EIN.

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFlanor From Netherlands, joined Nov 1999, 126 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2730 times:

Great news. Let's hope it will be a succes. Maybe some of the leisure flights that AMS will have to get rid of (as decided at the 'Alders table') can be transferred to ENS. Therefore I think Schiphol should have a stake in the new ENS.


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Quoting Joost (Thread starter):
I expect flights by HV, FR and charter airlines, very similar to the network presently operated at EIN

I would say more like Groningen (GRQ), judging by the number of people living in the area.

Some nostalgia: I remember how, years ago, they used to have a PA-system near the fence at Twente AFB/ENS where all the plane spotters were, that would announce arrivals of interest. Anybody else remember this?


User currently offlineTriStar500 From Germany, joined Nov 1999, 4692 posts, RR: 43
Reply 2, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2618 times:



Quoting Joost (Thread starter):
The Twente region is home to about 600.000 inhabitants, the catchment area of the airport is a bit larger, though. The airport competes with FMO, DTM, AMS, NRN and EIN.

Nice to see that not only German politicians have a tendency to invest their taxpayers' money in unneccessary airport projects.



Homer: Facts are meaningless. You could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
User currently offlineJoost From Netherlands, joined Apr 2005, 3158 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2606 times:



Quoting TriStar500 (Reply 2):
Nice to see that not only German politicians have a tendency to invest their taxpayers' money in unneccessary airport projects.

I can only agree here.

I just don't know how much money will be spent. The airport is already there, they actually only decide to keep it and refurbish it.

On the other hand, I would like to know how the money could be spent otherwise. For example, by upgrading the railway link to Amsterdam. Especially as this would benefit not only air travelers, but simply all passengers.

Or maybe they could have provided a start-up subsidy for a 3-4 times/day bus service to FMO.


User currently offlineDTManiac From Germany, joined Aug 2004, 689 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2593 times:

While I am not sure, that decision makes much sense financially, I am always happy to get more options for traveling. Still I can hardly imagine this airport making any significant money. As Joost already mentioned, there is a couple of better developed airports in the vicinity. With that I mean especially AMS, FMO and also DUS, which offer lots of flights on legacy carriers as well.

Without Ryanair NRN, which should be of a similar size compared to what ENS will be according to the plans, would already struggle to stay in business. Therefore, it will be interesting to see how ENS develops.



Gig 'em Aggies!!!
User currently offlineThestooges From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2458 times:

The biggest problem with ENS is its incredibly close proximity to FMO, however both NRN and EIN are about the same distance apart from each other and both appear to be doing quite well, with FR having significant bases at both airports.

Wikipedia says that FMO "serves over 6 million people living in the northern Ruhrgebiet (Ruhr Basin), southern Lower Saxony, Emsland, parts of the Netherlands (Euregio) and Westphalia." If this is the case then I can't see a problem with having 2 airports for an area with 6 million people. At the end of the day FMO is stealing Dutch passengers and now if ENS is developed, it will be able get some of them back as well as steal German passengers.

The Netherlands is one of the most densly populated countries in the world with more that 17 million people, which means that it should technically be able to support more than just the 4 commercial airports currently operating within its borders i.e. AMS, RTM, EIN, and GRQ. Although the country has previously sought to put as many passengers though AMS as possible, this has been countered by the recent trend of low-cost airlines seeking to serve smaller, cheaper and less congested airports on the edges of urban centres.

It would appear to me that the Dutch authorities have realised this, and this is why they have decided to develop ENS. Otherwise they would have continued to lose Dutch passengers to the German airports just across the border and all the revenue that goes with them.


User currently offlineKL577 From Netherlands, joined Oct 2006, 773 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2428 times:



Quoting Thestooges (Reply 5):
The Netherlands is one of the most densly populated countries in the world with more that 17 million people, which means that it should technically be able to support more than just the 4 commercial airports currently operating within its borders i.e. AMS, RTM, EIN, and GRQ. Although the country has previously sought to put as many passengers though AMS as possible, this has been countered by the recent trend of low-cost airlines seeking to serve smaller, cheaper and less congested airports on the edges of urban centres.

Yet, in the same time virtually every corner of the country is directly connected by train to AMS. The facilities in AMS are world class and there is (some) spare capacity left. There really has never been a motive to develop other airports. As a related example: I live 25 kilometers from EIN, but by public transport I can more quickly reach AMS than EIN.

In the same time the population density makes it very difficult to run an airport under current environmental regulations.

The civil airport operation in Enschede really has never been a success and I don't see why the situation now warrants investments. All airlines pulled out of the AMS-ENS sector eventually. Twente Airlines, in its heydays, attempted services to London and Paris, but these failed dramatically. The reason is indeed:

Quoting DTManiac (Reply 4):
As Joost already mentioned, there is a couple of better developed airports in the vicinity. With that I mean especially AMS, FMO and also DUS, which offer lots of flights on legacy carriers as well.

Indeed money is better spend in other ways:

Quoting Joost (Reply 3):
On the other hand, I would like to know how the money could be spent otherwise. For example, by upgrading the railway link to Amsterdam. Especially as this would benefit not only air travelers, but simply all passengers.



User currently offlineJoost From Netherlands, joined Apr 2005, 3158 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2387 times:



Quoting Thestooges (Reply 5):
The biggest problem with ENS is its incredibly close proximity to FMO, however both NRN and EIN are about the same distance apart from each other and both appear to be doing quite well, with FR having significant bases at both airports.

It's not incredibly close. From Enschede, it still takes a little more than an hour to reach the airport by private car. By public transport, it's more than 1:30, and less convenient than AMS (AMS is 2:15 by train, but Intercity service every 30 minutes and therefore very convenient).

However, FMO has a big advantage over Enschede, namely that it has a sort of "natural" domestic demand, for flights to MUC, NUE, TXL and STR. This provides a basic demand for the airport; the holiday flights are merely a "bonus" and those flights can be accomodated easily as the airport is already there.

In the Netherlands, there is simply no demand for domestic flights, because of the size of the country, the very dense infrastructure and the lack of real big cities: business are really widespread over the country, meaning that from any airport, you typically still have to drive a while to your destination. I have lived in Enschede for 7 years and I have never even thought something like "an air service would be convenient".


User currently offlineThestooges From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2371 times:



Quoting KL577 (Reply 6):
Yet, in the same time virtually every corner of the country is directly connected by train to AMS. The facilities in AMS are world class and there is (some) spare capacity left. There really has never been a motive to develop other airports. As a related example: I live 25 kilometers from EIN, but by public transport I can more quickly reach AMS than EIN.

However, Europes largest low-cost airline Ryanair, won't go anywhere near an airport like AMS, it doesn't matter how world class the facilities are or how much capacity is left. Ryanair tends to operate from out of the way and sometimes difficult to reach airports, such as EIN for example, but they somehow manage to make a lot of money from this approach. If the Netherlands don't do something to attract more low-cost airline operations, like opening more secondary airports that are the only places some low-cost airlines fly to, then they will surely miss out on the advantages that this massive boom in budget travel can offer.

At the end of the day EIN and ENS are never going to be to AMS what LTN and STN are to LHR but they can expect to see at least a few million passengers use the airports each year. I'm not necesarilly saying that ENS will be succesful but given the recent proliferation of service to smaller, regional and more out of the way airports, I really don't think its destined to fail either.


User currently offlineJoost From Netherlands, joined Apr 2005, 3158 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2365 times:



Quoting Thestooges (Reply 8):
If the Netherlands don't do something to attract more low-cost airline operations, like opening more secondary airports that are the only places some low-cost airlines fly to,

That's what Lelystad is developed for, also expected to be operational around 2012. Lelystad has a way better location compared to ENS to attract passengers and it can actually act well as an alternative to AMS.

Quoting Thestooges (Reply 8):
If the Netherlands don't do something to attract more low-cost airline operations, like opening more secondary airports that are the only places some low-cost airlines fly to, then they will surely miss out on the advantages that this massive boom in budget travel can offer.



Quoting Thestooges (Reply 5):
Otherwise they would have continued to lose Dutch passengers to the German airports just across the border and all the revenue that goes with them.

I'm not sure what these advantages are. What are the actual benefits of having an airport that's mostly used for Dutch residents going on holiday? The few euros they spend for a drink in the airport restaurant?

Enschede is not comparable with the likes of London or Girona (or Amsterdam) who benefit from a tourist inflow.


User currently offlineThestooges From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2360 times:



Quoting Joost (Reply 7):
In the Netherlands, there is simply no demand for domestic flights, because of the size of the country, the very dense infrastructure and the lack of real big cities: business are really widespread over the country, meaning that from any airport, you typically still have to drive a while to your destination. I have lived in Enschede for 7 years and I have never even thought something like "an air service would be convenient".

I absolutely agree with this, of course there is no need for any domestic service within the Netherlands. If ENS sees any airline service it will most likely be to the typical Southern European holiday hotspots and if an airline like FR decides to set up shop there, then you could possibly see service to some of their major bases like STN, DUB, NYO, BGY, GRO etc. So at the end of the day ENS might only see about half a million passengers each year, but isnt that better than having those half a million passengers use airports elsewhere which is of absolutely no benefit to the local economy.


User currently offlineThestooges From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2358 times:

Quoting Joost (Reply 9):
That's what Lelystad is developed for, also expected to be operational around 2012. Lelystad has a way better location compared to ENS to attract passengers and it can actually act well as an alternative to AMS.

Atually I've never even heard of this new airport near Lelystad !!! I was just about to make some comment that they should establish an airport around this area, and guess what they actually are !!!

Quoting Joost (Reply 9):
What are the actual benefits of having an airport that's mostly used for Dutch residents going on holiday? The few euros they spend for a drink in the airport restaurant?


Well I thinks its a bit hard to say exactly what the economic benefits are of having an airport in the area, but I'm sure its much more than just the revenue from selling a few drinks here and there. It might not be a huge amount of money but it would be somewhat significant and I imagine it would employ at least 100 people.

[Edited 2009-07-01 07:53:11]

User currently offlineJoost From Netherlands, joined Apr 2005, 3158 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2304 times:



Quoting Thestooges (Reply 10):
So at the end of the day ENS might only see about half a million passengers each year.

Half a million pax a year is indeed reasonable, although then you already need to draw pax from the Arnhem or Apeldoorn region, and from the border. When prices are low, this is fine, but it shouldn't be taxpayers money that's spent to support the services.

Quoting Thestooges (Reply 10):
but isnt that better than having those half a million passengers use airports elsewhere which is of absolutely no benefit to the local economy.

I very much doubt it. I think it's better to have a few good airports with good networks, than many airports here and there (like in the UK).

Quoting Thestooges (Reply 11):
It might not be a huge amount of money but it would be somewhat significant and I imagine it would employ at least 100 people.

I've done some research to this subject a couple of years ago, and I'm still keeping up with the subject, giving 1 or 2 classes a year at my old university on the subject. An airport like Enschede would generate between 150 and 300 jobs, depending on what activities will be developed (for example, when an airline bases an aircraft there and employs people locally, the number goes up drastically; 30-40 jobs per 737/A320 for cabin crew, flight crew, etc.)

But if this means that 150-300 people lose their job in EIN, where's the benefit?

If the airport is completely self-supporting (okay, start-up money is fine for the first couple of year), then fine. But I think it will be costing the regional government lots of money for many years.


User currently offlineThestooges From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 2258 times:

Quoting Joost (Reply 12):
I think it's better to have a few good airports with good networks, than many airports here and there (like in the UK).

I definitely agree with this, but I would have to say that it's airlines like Ryanair who are making a lot of money in scenarios where there are a lot of second-rate airports with bad networks. Don't ask me how it works, but it does. I understand of course that the Dutch infrastructure is much, much more organised than in the UK but sometimes this organisation can actually end up restricting economic growth.

Quoting Joost (Reply 12):
But if this means that 150-300 people lose their job in EIN, where's the benefit?

In some ways yes, ENS may end up stealing passengers from EIN but it might also create a brand new market from people who otherwise would never have flown in the first place. Airlines like Ryanair are very much built on the premise of "if you fly it, they will come". I don't think you can say that every passegner who uses STN is someone who would have flown into LHR or LGW, in fact most of the passengers who fly into STN are people who would not have flown or even traveled in the first place. I know that comparing STN and LHR to ENS and EIN probably isnt the best example but it does bear some relevance.

EIN will definitely lose some traffic to both LEY and ENS once they both open because many people now use EIN as the only alternative airport for AMS even though its much, much further away from Amsterdam. I know people who live near Lelystad who drove all the way to EIN just to fly to STN, and in the future they would of course be able to use LEY or even ENS if thats where the cheapest fares are. Even if EIN does lose some traffic, they could still make up for it if the airport continues to grow. So at the end of the day the situation may be that EIN won't lose 150-300 jobs, but that they just won't end up gaining those jobs, with them going to ENS or LEY instead.

I think the aiport situation in the Netherlands is definitely going to very interesting in a few years with no less than 6 commercial airport: AMS, RTM, EIN, GRQ, ENS and LEY.

[Edited 2009-07-01 10:48:49]

User currently offlineRiver747 From Netherlands, joined Aug 2005, 57 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 2227 times:



Quoting Thestooges (Reply 13):
I think the aiport situation in the Netherlands is definitely going to very interesting in a few years with no less than 6 commercial airport: AMS, RTM, EIN, GRQ, ENS and LEY.

Last time I checked MST was also still in The Netherlands.... although I have to admit it is very close to the border


User currently offlineThestooges From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (5 years 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 2209 times:



Quoting River747 (Reply 14):
Last time I checked MST was also still in The Netherlands.... although I have to admit it is very close to the border

Whoops, forgot about that one !!! So I guess that will make 7 !!!

But I honestly can't blame myself that much, seeing that Maastricht is almost an island connected to the rest of the country by only a very narrow 5km corridor  Wink


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