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Passenger Fixes Faulty Airliner - Thomas Cook  
User currently offlineImag From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2007, 197 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 14968 times:

I did a search but couldn't find anything already posted about this.

Is this a first??? Anyone have any further info - what was the problem???

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgow_and_west/8136193.stm

27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26787 posts, RR: 58
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 14936 times:

I hope they gave him a free ticket somewhere .

User currently offlineGBan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 14901 times:

BBC could have written "Qualified aircraft engineer fixes faulty airliner" since he did not loose his qualification by boarding an aircraft as a passenger. Obviously the title choosen sounds much more exciting  Wink

User currently offlineAPYu From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2007, 829 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 14808 times:



Quoting GBan (Reply 2):
BBC could have written "Qualified aircraft engineer fixes faulty airliner" since he did not loose his qualification by boarding an aircraft as a passenger. Obviously the title choosen sounds much more exciting

The title chosen makes it news



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User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6293 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 14738 times:

Is it a first? Probably not. I don't know any other instances on the top of my head, but after 100 years there aren't many "firsts" in aviation anymore.

I'm kind of confused though...isn't 8 hours the standard delay on Thomas Cook? This guy really screwed up their business plan, what with a barely 30 minute delay!  duck 

Quoting GBan (Reply 2):
Obviously the title choosen sounds much more exciting

I know, how dare journalists try to attract readers to their stories  Wink


User currently offlineImag From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2007, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 14724 times:

Does he work for a competeing airline, or are they part of the same group? Try explaining it to your boss if it's a competitor and why you're flying it.....  stirthepot 

User currently offlineWexfordflyer From Ireland, joined Jun 2009, 550 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 14586 times:

I'm surprised other passengers were trusting of this and didnt flip out and refuse to fly!!


Come with me, there's a place I want you to see, where the leaves are dark, I've got a hiding place in central park.
User currently onlineRbgso From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 586 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 days ago) and read 14374 times:

Good thing he had some speed tape in his carry-on. Big grin

Seriously, I wonder what type of repair it was.


User currently offlineAPYu From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2007, 829 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 years 6 days ago) and read 14358 times:



Quoting Imag (Reply 5):
Does he work for a competeing airline, or are they part of the same group? Try explaining it to your boss if it's a competitor and why you're flying it.....

He may have booked a Thomson holiday but the flight was operated by TCX.

Quoting Wexfordflyer (Reply 6):
I'm surprised other passengers were trusting of this and didnt flip out and refuse to fly!!

Some probably did flip and initially refuse to fly, but when they were told they'd have to pay for their own repatriation as the aircraft was fit to fly then they probably decided to board anyway to save several hundred pounds.



We'd like to welcome in particular our Executive Club members and those joining us from our Oneworld alliance partners.
User currently offlineThebatman From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 844 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (5 years 6 days ago) and read 14248 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting Imag (Reply 5):
Does he work for a competeing airline, or are they part of the same group?

"The passenger worked for another airline, Thomsonfly, which has a reciprocal maintenance agreement with Thomas Cook." - that's why they let him fix it. I was on an ATA flight where part of the trim on the overhead bin came down and hit a passenger in the head. I told the FA that I was a technician for "another airline" and volunteered to fix it (this happened on take-off roll, not sitting at the gate). She asked the captain, and he said "no". They wound up shuffling all kinds of people around just to clear that row of seats! Oh well....



A319,A320,B727,B732/3/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3,B762/3,B772,CRJ2/7,DC9/MD80,DC10,E145/70
User currently offlineChuchoteur From France, joined Sep 2006, 760 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 13836 times:

definitely interesting to know what the problem was... that could be fixed with available line station tooling/line spares and some know how.

"ah captain, this here circuit breaker has been pulled..."
LoL

The fact that hes a licensed engineer, with a company that is approved to handle maintenance for that airline goes a long way.

I remember flying to Mauritius (on Air Mauritius) with a team of licensed engineers to do a C check down there. Middle of the flight, the forward lavs went tech. Back in those days (pre-9/11) a lot of the guys used to hand carry some of their tools, and they volunteered to "check it out".

Ended up dismantling and reassembling half the lavs to get them working again, and we got free booze for the remainder of the flight.


User currently onlineBongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3526 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (5 years 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 13662 times:

It happened to me on a VS flight from ANU to LGW about 9 years ago. We took off from ANU, and after about 40 minutes the captain informed us that the HF radios didn't work, thus we would have to return to ANU. We duly watched on the map as the plane did a 180 turn.
10 minutes later the plane did another 180. The captain duly announced that an off duty VS engineer had made himself known to the crew, and had then been to the flightdeck and rectified the minor problem.
Looks of relief all round, as ANU isn't really an airport where you would want to spend too much time, and we had already been delayed enough to get a meal voucher.


User currently offlineHAWk21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31660 posts, RR: 56
Reply 12, posted (5 years 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 13473 times:

Trust me.....not the first time someone saves the day.Happened thrice before.  biggrin 

regds
MEL.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineG-CIVP From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1313 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (5 years 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 13414 times:

An educated guess suggests that it happens all the time. Given we are in the 'silly season', it must have been an awfully dry day media wise even for this 'story', or more correctly, 'non-event' to be reported.

User currently offlineSebjacques92 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2007, 138 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 13414 times:

Quote from the BBC

"It was reassuring to know the person who had fixed it was still on the aeroplane. What are the odds of something like that happening?"

I should imagine the odds are incredibly high with all the maintaince crews being flown around to work on different projects, i just suspect not everyone is willing to stand up and fix the problem without payment.

Quite a nice thing of this man to do and probably saved a lot of passngers moroe hastle

Seb


User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6293 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (5 years 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 13383 times:



Quoting Sebjacques92 (Reply 14):
Quite a nice thing of this man to do and probably saved a lot of passngers moroe hastle

Including himself. I mean yeah, it's great, and I wish he were on my flight if this ever happened! But, he was also doing it to get his own butt home and out of an 8-hour delay. Not that I blame him!


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31660 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (5 years 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 13371 times:

Its better still when the Pax applaud the rectification action as the Hero walks the aisle to his seat at the aft end of the aircraft.  Smile
regds
MEL.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineLTC8K6 From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 1170 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (5 years 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 13275 times:



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 16):
Its better still when the Pax applaud the rectification action as the Hero walks the aisle to his seat at the aft end of the aircraft.

Yeah, wouldn't be too good if he fixed it and then got off the plane... Big grin


User currently offlineMidEx216 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 651 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (5 years 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 12111 times:



Quoting Imag (Reply 5):
Does he work for a competeing airline, or are they part of the same group? Try explaining it to your boss if it's a competitor and why you're flying it..... stirthepot

I would call it bad form to be upset with an employee for helping another airline. As long as it doesn't have a poor effect on your own company.

Working at MKE, I saw a bag jam at the NW baggage carousel (underneath, in the tunnel), so I unloaded my bags, went up, told the baggage office (flooded with passengers) about it, and I'd have it taken care of in a few minutes. And if nothing else, I'd say it's even better for us in that case, that we fixed what the employee didn't do



"Cue the Circus Music!"
User currently offlineEwRkId From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 594 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (5 years 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 11421 times:



Quoting Imag (Thread starter):
Is this a first???

This guy didn't fix the plane, but he saved it from running out of fuel, there was thread about this a couple of months ago. I can't seem to find it but here's the link : http://news.aol.com/article/fuel-leak-spotted/493936


User currently offlineEDICHC From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (5 years 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 10693 times:



Quoting Sebjacques92 (Reply 14):
Quote from the BBC

"It was reassuring to know the person who had fixed it was still on the aeroplane.

Puzzling statement there. Are most pax not reassured therefore when a minor fault is rectified and the mx engineer does not travel?


User currently offlineFlylku From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 795 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (5 years 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 9819 times:

Sometimes I wonder if a higher premium is put on the paperwork than the actual fix. You guys who work in this area might have some interesting stories about paperwork holding up a perfectly good airplane. I'm betting it happens.


...are we there yet?
User currently offlineNCB From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (5 years 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 9730 times:



Quoting Thebatman (Reply 9):
I told the FA that I was a technician for "another airline" and volunteered to fix it (this happened on take-off roll, not sitting at the gate). She asked the captain, and he said "no". They wound up shuffling all kinds of people around just to clear that row of seats! Oh well....

Well, you know that as a mech you need to be released by the maintenance shop of your operator or by the operator assigned organisation to carry out any repairs on an aircraft.
You must sign any repair you have performed in the tech log.

Quoting EwRkId (Reply 19):
This guy didn't fix the plane, but he saved it from running out of fuel, there was thread about this a couple of months ago. I can't seem to find it but here's the link : http://news.aol.com/article/fuel-lea...93936

"Saved it" is a big word knowing the required fuel checks on ETOPS and LROPS routes (every 15-30 minutes depending on company/aircraft procedures). They'd probably have found a fuel imbalance a bit later into the flight and diverted to a West coast airport and if they were really stubborn or the leak barely detectable, realising only over the ocean, diverted towards Anchorage or Honolulu. It looks like it was a UA B744, and seen the position of the leak, it would probably have been a ruptured reserve or main 1 tank. The fix would have been the closing of the main 1 to reserve tank valve or transfering any remaining fuel from the main 1 to main 2 tank and divert.

Really not a big deal, it happens all the time and often without large issues.

That a "passenger" fixed the airplane is something really brainless to write.
If the writer of the article only knew of all the paranoid procedures maintenance engineers have to deal with before they are authorised to release an aircraft, he'd know better.

Media love to write about "poor maintenance practices", "flying garbages", etc...
I would bet a fortune that they'd be throwing up their stomachs after a paranoic day in a maintenance hangar: one hand on the tools, the other hand on the phone with an angry ops manager or pilot at the end of the line waiting for his plane, or trying to remember in a traffic jam on their way back home, if they did, under the time pressure, not forget to install a critical part in the correct way...


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7687 posts, RR: 21
Reply 23, posted (5 years 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 9328 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

"Off-duty, fully-qualified aircraft engineer fixes plane belonging to company with which his company has reciprocal maintenance agreement". Excellent story.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineCentrair From Japan, joined Jan 2005, 3598 posts, RR: 20
Reply 24, posted (5 years 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 7054 times:

I was flying DTW-NGO a few years back when the AV system didn't work right. A guy volunteered to work on it. Ended up he worked for Panasonic. I think he worked on it for at least 3 or 4 hours of the entire 12 hour flight before giving up. People were thankful for his effort. Everyone got miles and he got offered an upgraded but refused. I heard him say, "I couldn't fix it so I will suffer with them all."


Yes...I am not a KIX fan. Let's Japanese Aviation!
25 Virgin747 : " target=_blank>http://news.aol.com/article/fuel-lea...93936 Can someone spell UNITED?
26 LMML 14/32 : During my cabin crew years, I always used to carry a small roll of speed tape in my flight bag. It did come in handy on one flight when the ground/fli
27 HAWK21M : The Pax would probably follow regds MEL.
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