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Combining Passions: Medicine In Com. Aviation?  
User currently offlineStarAlliance38 From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 1445 posts, RR: 3
Posted (5 years 2 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2035 times:

I am thinking to go into the medical field, but I would like to work for the airlines too. Are there any positions and job where I can do this?

I don't know the reality level of this, but while I'm going to medical school, would the airlines like it if I offer my services to passengers at their hubs for those who need it?

Thanks for the advice!


Roar, lion, roar
5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineHBJZA From Switzerland, joined Jan 2006, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 2 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2012 times:

Although not being very informed about that, I think you should work as a doctor for the airline employees. As every pilot and flight attendant have to undergo a medical check up every 2 years I think, I know that big airlines have their own doctors. But as far as I know for Switzerland, they have to be doctors of course but also certified by the FOCA (Federal Office for Civil Aviation). Probably similar in the USA !
Hope it helped


User currently offlineMarkHKG From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (5 years 2 months 5 days ago) and read 1998 times:

Consider contacting International SOS, Medaire, StatMD or some of the aviation medical companies. They provide telemedicine services to commercial airliners in case of an in-flight medical emergency. Medaire for instance has their dispatch center that uses docs out in Pheonix. Some companies also provide Medical Escorts for seriously sick patients on flights, sometimes using RNs and MDs, so you could be doing that too! Don't forget air ambulances too.

Also Aerospace Medicine is something to look at. NASA/ FAA's CAMI continually researches topics involving pilot related illness, fatalities, drug use, spatial disorientation, motion sickness, doing CPR in zero G (I'm serious...they did it on the vomit comet!)

Good luck!

[Edited 2009-07-18 12:22:49]


Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19717 posts, RR: 58
Reply 3, posted (5 years 2 months 5 days ago) and read 1976 times:



Quoting StarAlliance38 (Thread starter):

I don't know the reality level of this, but while I'm going to medical school, would the airlines like it if I offer my services to passengers at their hubs for those who need it?

While you are in medical school, your services are not useful to any commercial interest because you do not have a medical license and, thus, are not licensed to practice medicine.

However, there are a number of firms that contract with airlines to provide in-flight medical advice, and their doctors (usually board-certified in Emergency or Internal Medicine) do the consultation. From a lifestyle standpoint, you can work from home (I think...although their publicity website shows the doctors inexplicably wearing stethoscopes), part-time or full time, and it's pure shiftwork. You aren't going to have to work more than a few minutes past your time because you can sign out a case that's in progress to the physician coming on, just like emergency medicine.

The downside, as I see it, is that it can't be easy to make decisions for a patient who you can't see. You'll be under a lot of pressure from management to keep planes in the air, but under a lot of internal pressure from a lack of clinical information to land every call you get. Believe me, phone triage is not easy because you lose so much information without being able to even glance at the patient. A quick glance can at least tell you whether someone is stable or if they might suddenly crump. The other downside, at least in my own POV, is that what I love about being a doctor is the patients. I love my patients and I have so much fun with them and really enjoy working with them. In this line of work, you will only ever talk to your patients on the phone, and usually you'll be talking to pilots and F/A's. That job would not fit me at all.


User currently offlineNws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 897 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (5 years 2 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1908 times:

There are several fixed-wing air medical companies that do long international or transcon flights with patients in smaller aircraft like Learjets. I know that they usually fly with a nurse and a paramedic onboard. One of the bigger operations is AirMed (www.airmed.com), but ther are many smaller ones as well.

User currently onlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21637 posts, RR: 55
Reply 5, posted (5 years 2 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1860 times:



Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 2):
Also Aerospace Medicine is something to look at. NASA/ FAA's CAMI continually researches topics involving pilot related illness, fatalities, drug use, spatial disorientation, motion sickness, doing CPR in zero G (I'm serious...they did it on the vomit comet!)

Beat me to it. That's a good option as well if you're not solely looking at the airlines. NASA isn't just about space.

But if you are into space, consider this: if NASA launches a mission to Mars, you can be damn sure there will be a doctor on board. Having done the stuff that Mark mentioned would make a good addition to the resume.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
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