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First JAL 767-300 Sold For Scrap - Part 2 (+photo)  
User currently offlinePlainplane From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 837 posts, RR: 1
Posted (5 years 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 9863 times:

Continued from http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/general_aviation/read.main/4468440/

Pellegrine, here is a photo of the aircraft:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Andre Klass



Since I took the photo, the control surfaces and nose cone have been removed. The aircraft had moved to the far corner of the airport next to N279AX, but now it has mysteriously disappeared. Next to N509US and N511US still in front of the Avocet building, N512US is now in the scrap line as well as an unknown DC-9.

Quoting EcuadorianMD11:
1 more question............do airplane "scrap yards" exist.............(once again I´m talking about shredding metal), or do they always get taken apart in a "civilized" way?
Part by part I mean.........

Usually the scrappers remove and sell any potentially usable parts from the aircraft. Then the remaining parts of the aircraft are just left somewhere, often becoming scrap metal.

[Edited 2009-07-25 23:19:37]

29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineKingFriday013 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 1296 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 9424 times:

Any chance they'll be selling parts? E.g. pitot tubes, cockpit parts, anything that might be desirable to an aviation enthusiast trying to save them from the desert-- or are they gone already?
Wow...  tombstone 

-J.



Tho' I've belted you an' flayed you, By the livin' Gawd that made you, You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!
User currently offlineLotsamiles From United States of America, joined May 2005, 323 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9325 times:

N767NG was crushed and cut up, now on the way to becoming beer cans.

Depending on the location of the scrapper, hulls may go out to pasture just in case something is needed later. However, as with Sanford, where space matters it is not economical to keep hulls lying around and they are removed to make room the next aircraft. Besides that, the value of the scrap metal helps the owner recover their investment.


User currently offlineDazed767 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5494 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9296 times:

The DC10 is still sitting out there at the North end of the field now.

User currently offlineAtlanta From United States of America, joined Jun 2008, 473 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9242 times:



Quoting Lotsamiles (Reply 2):
was crushed and cut up, now on the way to becoming beer cans.

I never understood this, do airplanes really become cans? I didn't think this was true.

Atlanta



Welcome To The New Delta- The World's Largest Airline
User currently offlineTrigged From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 539 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9224 times:



Quoting Atlanta (Reply 4):
I never understood this, do airplanes really become cans? I didn't think this was true.

Atlanta

No, they don't because it is a different alloy, but it is a common phrase just to say that it is being recycled by saying, "it is being turned into beer cans."


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19505 posts, RR: 58
Reply 6, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9192 times:



Quoting Trigged (Reply 5):

No, they don't because it is a different alloy, but it is a common phrase just to say that it is being recycled by saying, "it is being turned into beer cans."

What DO they do with it?


User currently offlineTSS From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 3068 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9153 times:



Quoting Plainplane (Thread starter):
Pellegrine, here is a photo of the aircraft:

View Large View Medium

Photo © Andre Klass

Aw man, in that photo the aircraft looks like it's been crying.  weeping 



Able to kill active threads stone dead with a single post!
User currently offlinePlainplane From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 837 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9033 times:



Quoting Lotsamiles (Reply 2):
N767NG was crushed and cut up, now on the way to becoming beer cans.

Thank you for the information. I was not aware that the final scrapping had already taken place.

Quoting TSS (Reply 7):
Aw man, in that photo the aircraft looks like it's been crying.  weeping 

I agree.  crying 


User currently offlineTrigged From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 539 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9022 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 6):
What DO they do with it?

Smelted into ingots, sometimes used for casting other stuff. Aircraft aluminum is a highly alloyed mix, generally consisting of 2xxx or 7xxx series alloys. Beverage cans are a 3xxx alloy of a very small alloy percentage, generally 2-3% of total composition with the lids of a 5xxx series alloy IIRC. Aircraft aluminum can be around 10% alloying composition.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19505 posts, RR: 58
Reply 10, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9015 times:



Quoting Trigged (Reply 9):

Smelted into ingots, sometimes used for casting other stuff. Aircraft aluminum is a highly alloyed mix, generally consisting of 2xxx or 7xxx series alloys. Beverage cans are a 3xxx alloy of a very small alloy percentage, generally 2-3% of total composition with the lids of a 5xxx series alloy IIRC. Aircraft aluminum can be around 10% alloying composition.

OK, but then what do the ingots become? In other words, what is the use of aircraft aluminum?


User currently offlineKL911 From Czech Republic, joined Jul 2003, 5126 posts, RR: 12
Reply 11, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9002 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 10):
OK, but then what do the ingots become? In other words, what is the use of aircraft aluminum?

Cant they use it to produce aluminium for new planes?


User currently offlinePlainplane From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 837 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 8947 times:



Quoting KL911 (Reply 11):
Cant they use it to produce aluminium for new planes?

I am wondering the same. However I am unsure if the high amount of cycles this aircraft had would be a factor in determining that.


User currently offlineMarkATL From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 539 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 8886 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 10):
OK, but then what do the ingots become? In other words, what is the use of aircraft aluminum?

I read once that it's mostly used to make engine blocks for cars.



"...left my home in Georgia, 'n headed for the "Frisco" Bay...
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3516 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 8029 times:
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Quoting Plainplane (Reply 12):
I am wondering the same. However I am unsure if the high amount of cycles this aircraft had would be a factor in determining that.

I believe resmelting the aluminum makes high cycles a non factor.



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User currently offlineTrigged From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 539 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 7167 times:



Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 14):
I believe resmelting the aluminum makes high cycles a non factor.

True. Once you melt the aluminum, you remove all of the grain structure that is part of the cycle problem. Once you melt it down and recast, you are forming new grain structure and therefore restarting the process. The problem is with the alloy. Unless you test each piece that you put in the smelter, you come up with a new alloy that may not be suitable for aircraft grade parts. Some is 7xxx series, some 2xxx series, etc. You basically make a totally new alloy once you melt it all down. The aluminum blocks for engines and other parts are not as dependent on the alloy as the high cycle alloy used for the skin and other parts for an aircraft.

If you crack an engine block on the highway from overheating, you pull over to the side of the road, get out and cuss while you call a tow truck. You crack a wing spar at FL350, you have invented the manned lawn dart. The quality control on material properties, and therefore the alloy content/quantity is MUCH more stringent on aircraft related parts.


User currently offlinePlainplane From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 837 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 7167 times:



Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 14):
I believe resmelting the aluminum makes high cycles a non factor.

It is very sad to think that is what happens to many planes.

To my understanding there are plans to scrap more of JAL's early 767s, can someone confirm?


User currently offlineLotsamiles From United States of America, joined May 2005, 323 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 6658 times:



Quoting Plainplane (Reply 16):
To my understanding there are plans to scrap more of JAL's early 767s, can someone confirm?

Another is being scrapped at Victorville Aerospace right now.


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3516 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 6606 times:
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Quoting Plainplane (Reply 16):
It is very sad to think that is what happens to many planes.

If you're an airplane, ending up in scrap yard after safely hauling millions of passengers is a good end and a job well done.....



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User currently offlinePellegrine From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2421 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 6558 times:



Quoting Plainplane (Thread starter):
Pellegrine, here is a photo of the aircraft:

Why thank you.  Smile

Quoting Plainplane (Thread starter):
Since I took the photo, the control surfaces and nose cone have been removed. The aircraft had moved to the far corner of the airport next to N279AX, but now it has mysteriously disappeared.

Has it been cut in half already? Or did they put it in a hanger?

How about getting a spy shot of the huge guillotine blade coming down on its backbone!  biting 



oh boy!!!
User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6420 posts, RR: 54
Reply 20, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 6465 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 10):
OK, but then what do the ingots become? In other words, what is the use of aircraft aluminum?

I remember some fifteen years back in time, a company producing aluminum components for VW cars cleaned out the Polish Air Force inventory of MiG-15UTI two seat trainer fighters.

I own an eleven years old VW, so maybe.....?



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlinePlainplane From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 837 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 6311 times:



Quoting Lotsamiles (Reply 17):
Another is being scrapped at Victorville Aerospace right now.

Thanks for the info again, do they intend to preserve any of the 767s at all? Even just one?

Quoting Pellegrine (Reply 19):
Has it been cut in half already? Or did they put it in a hanger?

According to Lotsamiles the aircraft has already been completely scrapped.  Sad


User currently offlineMSYPI7185 From United States of America, joined Oct 2007, 710 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 5066 times:



Quoting KingFriday013 (Reply 1):
Any chance they'll be selling parts? E.g. pitot tubes, cockpit parts, anything that might be desirable to an aviation enthusiast trying to save them from the desert-- or are they gone already?

Try ebay. There are many commercial aircraft parts there. I have watched some interesting things come and go. Latest score was a 707/KC135 hubcap, but it was not exactly cheap, but not unreasonable either.

MD


User currently offlinePellegrine From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2421 posts, RR: 8
Reply 23, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 5051 times:



Quoting Plainplane (Reply 21):
According to Lotsamiles the aircraft has already been completely scrapped. Sad

Wow they are quick like piranhas on a piece of dead animal huh?



oh boy!!!
User currently offlinePlainplane From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 837 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (5 years 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 4721 times:



Quoting Pellegrine (Reply 23):
Wow they are quick like piranhas on a piece of dead animal huh?

The plane has only been here for a little over two months. Does scrapping usually take place this quickly?


25 Lotsamiles : Usually 30 to 60 days once they start the process, time is money!
26 Lotsamiles : Sorry folks, the hull is not quite there yet. I just recieved new info that the final chop up process is pending any day now. You know what they say
27 Jetstar : I believe the FAA regulations require the use of new aluminum for use in aircraft structures, for non structural use like serving carts or cargo conta
28 AirbusA6 : And after a good life, transporting millions of people safely, the plane will no doubt end up in Silicon Heaven... While 763A models aren't much soug
29 Plainplane : Do you have any information about what area the aircraft is sitting at now?
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