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Braniff "72P", "72S", And "743"  
User currently offlineOB1504 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 3357 posts, RR: 6
Posted (5 years 1 month 4 weeks ago) and read 3727 times:

I have a Braniff flight schedule that the airline submitted to MIA Airside Operations on April 26th, 1982, just two weeks before the cessation of operations. Some of the equipment codes are a little mind-boggling, though.

There are flights listed as being operated by "DC-8" and "747" equipment, which is easy enough to understand.

There are some flights, however, such as BN 977, routing JFK-MIA-PTY-CLO on Sundays, that are listed as being operated by "72S" equipment. What particular model of the 727 is the 72S?

There are also countless flights, such as BN 493, routing MIA-DFW-SFO, listed as being operated by "743" equipment. Since BN never flew the 743, I'm left wondering if these flights were flown by 747-100/-200s or by 747SPs.

On a schedule from October 14th, 1981, there are also flights listed as being operated by "72P" aircraft, including BN 149, routing MIA-DFW-DEN. Again, what model of the 727 is the 72P?

Any help in deciphering these old BN equipment codes will be greatly appreciated!

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 3652 times:

A 72S is a 727-200 Advanced. The 72P and the 743 may have been internal codes for BN, as there is not a 72P IATA a/c code and the 743 IATA code is for the 747-300 (Which was not even in service yet and at that time had not flown.). I'm guessing that the 72P might be their code for a 727-100 Combi and you might be right about the 743 being the 747SP.

User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25408 posts, RR: 49
Reply 2, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3514 times:

As Srbmod mentions the 72S is certainly the 727-Stretch which is the proper IATA code for the 727-200.

The 743 I suspect is the 747SP. Towards the end Braniff did have 747SP flights from Miami to places like Bogota. However there should not be "countless" flights as the 747SP fleet was merely only 3 frames as I recall.

Lastly I'm not to sure about the 72P. I know towards the end Braniff was in the process of going from a 2-class to all economy product in its 727s, so maybe this is part of highlighting the different configurations, or might indeed be the 727-100, but I am not too sure how many -100s were left when the carrier shut down as I thought they had transitioned them out.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineOuboy79 From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 4600 posts, RR: 22
Reply 3, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3497 times:



Quoting LAXintl (Reply 2):
As Srbmod mentions the 72S is certainly the 727-Stretch which is the proper IATA code for the 727-200.

I always wondered what the whole reasoning was for people to start using 722 when it was 72S for years. I guess the same can be said about the 737-200 which was 73S and changed to 732 - but the additional versions sorta make a better excuse.


User currently offlineOB1504 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 3357 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3357 times:



Quoting LAXintl (Reply 2):
The 743 I suspect is the 747SP. Towards the end Braniff did have 747SP flights from Miami to places like Bogota. However there should not be "countless" flights as the 747SP fleet was merely only 3 frames as I recall.

They were frequent visitors to MIA, it would seem. On some days, more 747SPs would visit than 727s or DC-8s.

The Sunday schedule had the following flights listed:

BN 496 SFO-DFW-MIA 0012 / BN 493 MIA-DFW-SFO 0910
BN 490 SFO-DFW-MIA 1105 / BN 72 MIA-DFW 1205
BN 351 DFW-MIA 1135 / BN 359 MIA-DFW 1210
BN 74 DEN-DFW 1410 / BN 182 MIA-DFW-SEA 1505
BN 396 LAX-DFW-MIA 1607 / BN 397 MIA-DFW-LAX 1755
BN 183 SEA-DFW-MIA 2005 / BN 76 MIA-DFW-TUL 2040

Now that I think about it, though, it's more likely that only the DFW-MIA-DFW sectors were 747SPs, and the others were continuing flight numbers with a change of gauge.


User currently offlineCALPSAFltSkeds From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 2638 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3298 times:



Quoting Ouboy79 (Reply 3):
Quoting LAXintl (Reply 2):
As Srbmod mentions the 72S is certainly the 727-Stretch which is the proper IATA code for the 727-200.

I always wondered what the whole reasoning was for people to start using 722 when it was 72S for years. I guess the same can be said about the 737-200 which was 73S and changed to 732 - but the additional versions sorta make a better excuse.

The 72S and 73S were used when they were the first additional versions of the type. Unlike the 737, the only additional size version of the 727 was the 72S.
Since Boeing and Airbus started producing more than a "stretch" version, someone decided to go with the last indicator or two being the series. Since no one except some cargo carriers and few non-US fly the 727, it wouldn/t make sense to rename the 72S to 722. But, I think we all know that each of those dsignations mean the same thing.


User currently offlineExitrowaisle From United States of America, joined May 2000, 264 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2939 times:

In 1981, in one of its last-ditch survival attempts, Braniff converted a number of 727s to all coach in attempt to market itself as a low-fare carrier like Southwest. They called the one-class service Express. Some of the 727s kept the 2-class interior, which was adverstised as "Premium" service. It ultimately didn't help, since Braniff was traditionally known for its excellent first class inflight service, and going to all economy diluted its image. The sub-fleets also caused confusion among passengers the same way that United and Ted did.

Anyway, It could be that the 72P in your schedule were the 2-class jets, and the 72S were the one-class economy planes. Towards the very end, the all-economy service was later rebranded as "Texas Class."


User currently offlineSeptember11 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 3623 posts, RR: 21
Reply 7, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2887 times:



Quoting CALPSAFltSkeds (Reply 5):
But, I think we all know that each of those dsignations mean the same thing.

Exactly. NW still uses equipment code D9S, the code for DC-9-30s, on their web site. I suppose the letter S stands for Stretched. Even though, DC-9-30s are smaller than DC-9-50s, NW uses equipment code D95, the code for DC-9-50s. They seem never to bother to use the code D93.



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