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Caloric Content Of Airline Meals  
User currently offlineKleinsim From Qatar, joined Jan 2007, 154 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 15291 times:

Hi guys,

So, random question. I generally do not count calories but I was having a chat with a flight attendant on a recent flight of mine to the Arabian/Persian Gulf. He said that airline food can be hihgly caloric to make sure that passengers get full even from smaller poritions. The lamb with rice thingy that I had was good but he said that it weighted in at 1800-2000 kcal. That's the recommended daily consumption for a male... Good thing I wasn't connecting  Smile Does anybody know if this is just bad rumors or if there is some substance to this?

Thanks  Smile

Kleinsim

29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineT8KE0FF From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 410 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 15262 times:

well it's mainly fat stuck on with fat and with fat poured over it so it is very calorific!

eat wisely!

PS if you're also concerned about calories most airline's have a low-cal meal. Although even this has to many calories for me!



RJ85 E145 E195 A319 A320 A330 A340 A380 B737 B747 B757 B767 B777 B787 DH4
User currently offlineBeakerLTN From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2009, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 15225 times:

I can highly recommend AF's Confit of Duck with cep meshrooms and rosemary potatoes.. superb. I think that was about 5,000 calories though. Very good for a night's flight/sleep to HKG.

(note: this wasn't in Y).  Smile



300/319/320/321/330/732/733/734/73G/738/744/772/77W/146/EMB135/EMB145
User currently offlineNaritaflyer From Japan, joined Apr 2006, 549 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 15204 times:

If you fly Japanese airlines and choose the Japanese food "wa shoku" instead of the western course you'll get good tasting low calorie food.

User currently offlineSKORD From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2008, 562 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 15184 times:

Most airline meals are injected with extra fat. At high altitude your sence of taste is dulled so they inject the fat to give the meal more taste. When i flew as crew a few years ago, our cooked breakfasts were something like 2000 calories each!!!!

User currently offlineB747-4U3 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2002, 990 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 15122 times:

When I last flew with ANA the stewardesses had a card with the picture of the meal and the calorie content. The meal I had was around 460 calories (I forget the exact number). I was quite surprised at how high it was when considering the portion size. Just on a side note, ANA is the only airline I have been on that has served good rice. Most of the time it is too dry and crunchy or too greasy. ANA got it spot on - fluffy and soft!

User currently offlineCODC10 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2397 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 15058 times:

A full CO BusinessFirst meal (if you eat everything from start to finish) is somewhere around 3500 calories, according to a flight attendant I spoke with some time ago, and I believe it!

- Nuts
- Appetizers [often a cream soup, something fried (crab cake), or rich (beef Wellington)]
- Salad (with dressings)
- Frequent bread runs
- Entree [always steak (with maitre'd butter, potatoes, and buttery veggies), some chicken with cheese, a pasta dish with cheese, or buttery fish]
- Cheese course
- Ice cream sundae

Hell, 3500 calories may be a conservative estimate!


User currently offlineSpeedyGonzales From Norway, joined Sep 2007, 723 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 15013 times:



Quoting BeakerLTN (Reply 2):
5,000 calories

5 million!

Quoting SKORD (Reply 4):
2000 calories

2 million!

Quoting B747-4U3 (Reply 5):
460 calories

460 thousand!

Quoting CODC10 (Reply 6):
3500 calories

3,5 million!

I hate it when people forget the little 'k' in fron of the 'cal'.
Real men measure the energy content in the meals in kWh (1 kWh = 3600 kJ = 860 kcal), though Big grin



Las Malvinas son Argentinas
User currently offlineNaritaflyer From Japan, joined Apr 2006, 549 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 15011 times:



Quoting B747-4U3 (Reply 5):
The meal I had was around 460 calories (I forget the exact number). I was quite surprised at how high it was when considering the portion size.

Are you serious? people are throwing numbers like 3000 to 5000 calories per meal and you are shocked at the 460 calories?
Anyway, that's what I mean, if you pick the Japanese meal option the opportunity to inject fact is much less than in western meals and usually tastes better as well because the poeple chosing the meals are more conversant in Japanese offerings.

My own opinion is that lacing meals with fat has nothing to do with taste buds and more to do with saving money. Serving you small portions but making you feel full.


User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 9, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 14965 times:

I find it hard to believe that any meal contains 2000-5000 calories let alone the tiny portions airlines prepare for their passengers. Our meals do not have any nutritional information on their packaging but our crew meals (which are basically very similar, if not bigger) have that information labelled and do not typically contain any more calories than a supermarket ready meal. They certainly do not 'add fat' to their meals. Our crew chilli beef meal contains about 240 calories and 10 grams of fat. Hardly something to complain about.

Perhaps people are getting confused between units of measurement, I can imagine a meal easily containing 2000kj of energy. This would equate to around 480 calories.


User currently offlineCM767 From Panama, joined Dec 2004, 651 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 14904 times:

Worst I have seen was a box lunch on US Airways, I do not know of the calories, but enough fat and sugar to kill an elephant.


But The Best Thing God Has Created Is A New Day
User currently offlineRP TPA From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 852 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 14749 times:

You know it's bad news when the meal from BK or McD's is likely to be the healthier option!!

User currently offlineCODC10 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2397 posts, RR: 6
Reply 12, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 14738 times:



Quoting SpeedyGonzales (Reply 7):
I hate it when people forget the little 'k' in fron of the 'cal'.

Measurement of calories in kCal, while perhaps more accurate, is primarily seen in Europe. In the United States (where I reside) using 'calories' is a perfectly acceptable and officially observed notation.

Thanks for pointing out that kind of minutiae on a civil aviation forum...  Yeah sure


User currently offlineForce13 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 229 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 14717 times:

Considering the price of a Business Class or First Class ticket I damn well should get at least 4000-5000 calories (including beverages) from take off to touch down. Big grin

And remember, if it does not have a nutritional label anywhere then it is to be presumed that it has zero calories and is, in fact, good for you.



Do not taunt. Do not shake. Do not pander. Add coffee. Subject should be slightly human within an hour.
User currently offlineB747-4U3 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2002, 990 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 14706 times:



Quoting EGGD (Reply 9):
I find it hard to believe that any meal contains 2000-5000 calories let alone the tiny portions airlines prepare for their passengers. Our meals do not have any nutritional information on their packaging but our crew meals (which are basically very similar, if not bigger) have that information labelled and do not typically contain any more calories than a supermarket ready meal. They certainly do not 'add fat' to their meals. Our crew chilli beef meal contains about 240 calories and 10 grams of fat. Hardly something to complain about.

Perhaps people are getting confused between units of measurement, I can imagine a meal easily containing 2000kj of energy. This would equate to around 480 calories.

That would make more sense, especially considering that the average ready meal in the UK has between 500 and 700 calories, and are probably full of the same rubbish they stuff into plane food.


User currently offlineLuv2cattlecall From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1650 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 14681 times:
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Quoting SpeedyGonzales (Reply 7):
(1 kWh = 3600 kJ = 860 kcal)

I never knew that equation, thanks! If I'm doing the math correctly, it would be cheaper to power my home on the McDonald's value menu!

Quoting CM767 (Reply 10):
Worst I have seen was a box lunch on US Airways, I do not know of the calories, but enough fat and sugar to kill an elephant.

...Well...they did want the airline to offer a size 28 FA uniform  duck 

Quoting Force13 (Reply 13):

And remember, if it does not have a nutritional label anywhere then it is to be presumed that it has zero calories and is, in fact, good for you.

Force13 should be head of the FDA! I would gladly follow your version of the food guide pyramid!



When you have to breaststroke to your connecting flight...it's a crash!
User currently offlineGeo772 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2004, 519 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 14681 times:

I don't believe airline meals are any worse than eating out, I do agree that they will be prepared in such a way to have more flavour to counteract the altitude effect on taste. This might well mean they will have more salt or other undesirables however it will not be overly excessive.

More and more I'm seeing healthier options available, and some of these are really great. Main salads in First and Business, simple fish dishes, and indeed vegetarian options are all pretty decent to eat these days on board.

The snack boxes and the like of course do seem to be full of less desirable foodstuffs, which is a shame really, I'm personally not that big a fan of chocolate/chips(crisps) and processed sandwiches.

One thing I am aware though of is quantity. In business and first you are of course going to consume far too much if you indulge in everything on offer. As CODC10 mentioned about continental, just multiply that a bit for some First class offerings out there. Last time I flew in First I counted 6 distinct courses in addition to nuts, bread, and snacks that were on offer. Six hours later it was breakfast time with a full english on offer. Now that was a calorie laden flight Smile



Flown on A300B4/600,A319/20/21,A332/3,A343,B727,B732/3/4/5/6/7/8,B741/2/4,B752/3,B762/3,B772/3,DC10,L1011-200,VC10,MD80,
User currently offlineIRelayer From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1073 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 14590 times:

I love airline food. It combines two of my favorite things. Food + flying.

I don't care how many calories they have.

-IR


User currently offlineRobsaw From Canada, joined Dec 2008, 233 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days ago) and read 14318 times:



Quoting Naritaflyer (Reply 8):
My own opinion is that lacing meals with fat has nothing to do with taste buds and more to do with saving money. Serving you small portions but making you feel full.

Fatty foods do not make you feel full. Carb's and fibre make you feel full.

Fat makes food taste and feel good. Very low-fat food may not heat well and retain flavour in the typical aircraft oven environment.


User currently offlineFRAspotter From United States of America, joined May 2004, 2347 posts, RR: 9
Reply 19, posted (4 years 11 months 4 days ago) and read 14303 times:



Quoting B747-4U3 (Reply 5):
Just on a side note, ANA is the only airline I have been on that has served good rice. Most of the time it is too dry and crunchy or too greasy. ANA got it spot on - fluffy and soft!

That's good to hear. On a related note, I remember flying UA some time ago on a Trans Atlantic flight to FRA where they served spaghetti as an option. Needless to say it was pretty terrible. Most of the noodles were crunchy, stuck together and seemed to be cooked only on half of the meal. I imagine if they served rice, it would be a similar situation.

In regards to the calorie counting, the food IMO is terrible enough that I barely eat any of it let alone ALL of it... AA, UA and CO Y class meals of Beef, Chicken or Pasta get old REAL quick and are almost never good in my experience... I flew AA Business one time and the food was the exact same but with "prettier" table cloths, silverware, and trays... I am desperate to have an excuse to fly to East Asia on one of their carriers so I can try something NEW!  Smile



"Drunks run stop signs. Stoners wait for them to turn green."
User currently offlineKleinsim From Qatar, joined Jan 2007, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (4 years 11 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 13948 times:



Quoting SpeedyGonzales (Reply 7):
I hate it when people forget the little 'k' in fron of the 'cal'.

Theoretically speaking in America it is "lawful" to use the word Calorie to describe kcal. However, it needs to be captialized. In other words, 1000 calories are 1 Calorie. Obiously if you have that word at the beginning of a sentence you are kinda screwed... As we Germans would say, Americans need an extra sausage for everything  Smile

Kleinsim


User currently offlineAAMDanny From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2008, 352 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (4 years 11 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 13808 times:

My airline meals are stuffed with calories.... And e-numbers and all sorts of weird and wonderful preservatives. And so is our crew food.... Even the sandwhiches are stuffed with loads of crap! To preserve it! My advise... Take your own food!!

User currently offlineDecoder From Finland, joined Jun 2005, 80 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (4 years 11 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 13450 times:



Quoting IRelayer (Reply 17):
I love airline food. It combines two of my favorite things. Food + flying.

I don't care how many calories they have.

Truer words have never been spoken.

If airline meals are indeed the fat-soaked calorie bombs some people here claim them to be, wouldn't it be bad for the pilots (who eat the same food) in the long term? What airline wants to give their pilots a heart attack?


User currently offlineJetBlueAUS From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 1145 posts, RR: 8
Reply 23, posted (4 years 11 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 13249 times:

Do airlines offer gluten-free meals?


Not all of us can be heroes, some of us can only stand on the sidewalk and clap as they go by.
User currently offlineSoxfan From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 864 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (4 years 11 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 13228 times:



Quoting JetBlueAUS (Reply 23):
Do airlines offer gluten-free meals?

I think some do (not all) if they offer complimentary meal service including "special meals." I would check the airline website or call the airline directly to confirm this. At least with US airlines in general, special meals tend to be offered only to premium-class customers and/or on international flights (Europe/Asia/Australia/deep South America), but international airlines may have different policies.



Pilot: "Request push, which way should we face?" JFK Ground: "You better face the front, sir, or you'll scare the pax!"
25 Borism : Why would airline not want to give it's older pilots a heart attack? They are high-seniority, high-pay, high-maintenance, soon-to-retire folks. Most
26 AirlineCritic : I know everyone on this site loves aviation, but in my honest opinion you have now gone too far.
27 797 : 6000 calorie meal? That's almost a 3-day intake for me! I was thinking on how a round-world trip in Business Class would be!? Think about it! About 14
28 MMEPHX : 3000 calorie airline meals?? That's 3 big macs, 2 large fries and a large coke.
29 797 : At that point a Sundae wouldn't hurt! (I'm thinking of the one AA serves with the melted hot fudge and nuts of course! )
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