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8 Things An Airline Would Never Tell You  
User currently offlineThegreatRDU From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2310 posts, RR: 4
Posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 27000 times:

Most of us know all this stuff (including myself)....
1."Airport luggage scales often lie."
2. "Our air may make you sick."
3. "That nonstop flight you booked? We can add a layover to it—without explanation."
4. "We wouldn't tell you right away if there's an emergency."
5. "When we let you pick your seat assignment, we were only joking."
6. "Our planes are antiques."
7. "Our crew is totally exhausted."
8. "Your ticket might not be with the airline you booked."
http://guides.travel.msn.com/Guides/article.aspx?cp-documentid=1088188

Thoughts?


Our Returning Champion
105 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJRadier From Netherlands, joined Sep 2004, 4650 posts, RR: 50
Reply 1, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26950 times:



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
Thoughts?

the word 'sensationalist' comes to mind.....



For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and ther
User currently offlineMtnWest1979 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 2390 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26916 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
1."Airport luggage scales often lie

Here at Boise,ID the state bureau of weights and measures checks scales annually, and I have weighed myself ( when working at airport) on different airlines' scales and they were consistent.

Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
When we let you pick your seat assignment, we were only joking."

I enjoy seeing multitudes of pax come up to gate and want to change the seats that they themselves chose. Comical at times.



"If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"
User currently offlineThegreatRDU From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2310 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26915 times:



Quoting JRadier (Reply 1):
the word 'sensationalist' comes to mind.....

Of course it pisses me off what does that guy know about aviation...but he's doing his job getting people to read their articles



Our Returning Champion
User currently offlineAirstud From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2564 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26880 times:



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
2. "Our air may make you sick."

It being air; yeah that is true.

So can the air in restaurants, hospitals, elevators, supermarkets...



Pancakes are delicious.
User currently onlineB6JFKH81 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2848 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26865 times:

Here are the ones I have thoughts on:

Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
1."Airport luggage scales often lie."

But with the recent crack-downs, they are getting better quickly...

Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
2. "Our air may make you sick."

It has been well known for MANY years that air re-circulates. No surprise here.

Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
4. "We wouldn't tell you right away if there's an emergency."

Passengers don't need to be the first to know there is an emergency. The people operating that flight (from both inside and outside the aircraft) do and need to communicate with each other first, then when there is an understanding on what is going on and what actions to take, the pax should be briefed. AVIATE, NAVIGATE, COMMUNICATE.

Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
6. "Our planes are antiques."

If every person wanted to know how old their plane was, all they have to do is look at the certificate that is right above the door on the way in.

Quoting JRadier (Reply 1):
the word 'sensationalist' comes to mind.....

BINGO.

~H81



"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
User currently offlineMayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 9970 posts, RR: 14
Reply 6, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26818 times:



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
1."Airport luggage scales often lie."

I suppose the scale they used at home to weigh their bag is more accurate than these, eh?

I know the scales at SLC at both the ticket counter and air cargo are checked every six months by the bureau of weights and measures of the state of Utah.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineEwRkId From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 594 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26804 times:



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
3. "That nonstop flight you booked? We can add a layover to it—without explanation."

Maybe if people would take the time to read their ticket instead of just booking it because it said direct and not "nonstop."

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User currently offlineContrails15 From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26753 times:

Fragile means nothing to us.

You all can put as many Fragile stickers as you want. Doesn't matter.



Giants football!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
User currently offlineForce13 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 229 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26696 times:



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
Our crew is totally exhausted

So is your ticket counter crew, gate crew, ramp crew, catering crew, baggage service crew..... in fact evereone in the world who's checking in at 4a.m.



Do not taunt. Do not shake. Do not pander. Add coffee. Subject should be slightly human within an hour.
User currently offlineYellowtail From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 5887 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26628 times:

Quoting Contrails15 (Reply 8):
Fragile means nothing to us.

You all can put as many Fragile stickers as you want. Doesn't matter.

That is very true....last trip I saw my fragile box (with 8 stickers on it put by CO) that I paid $25 extra bag fee + $100 oversize fee (2 inches too much) for at the bottom of the baggage cart with maybe 600lbs of other bags immediately on top of it.

[Edited 2009-09-02 15:10:51]


When in doubt, hold on to your altitude. No-one has ever collided with the sky.
User currently offlineContrails15 From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26563 times:



Quoting Yellowtail (Reply 10):
That is very true....last trip I saw my fragile box that I paid $25 extra bag + $100 extra for at the bottom of the baggage cart with maybe 600lbs of other bags immediately on top of it.

Yup, sounds about right. My advice is always try not to pack fragile things in your checked bags and if you have too, take it apon yourself to make sure its secure and protected.



Giants football!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15493 posts, RR: 26
Reply 12, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 26561 times:



Quoting Airstud (Reply 4):
It being air; yeah that is true.

What you say is all valid, but there aren't that many other cases where you are sitting in a contained area for so long in such close proximity with others. Plus there is the low humidity, but that will be less of a problem in the 787.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineExFATboy From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2974 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 26437 times:

Many of these are true, but are either blown out of proportion or stated in a way that makes the airline sound malicious, rather than simply trying to cope with the complexities

1."Airport luggage scales often lie."

There have been problems, true, but that's true of any public scale. And most airlines are still letting a pound or two slide (well, at least in the US, gods help you if you're dealing with Ryanair...) Until airlines started enforcing the rules at all (I remember many, many flights where the scale just wasn't turned on!), this wasn't an issue and the weights & measures folks gave airport scale enforcement a low priority.

The article's suggestion that if in doubt, to ask that the bag be weighed again on another scale, is a good one.

2. "Our air may make you sick."

Again, true, but that's true of recirculated air anywhere. Modern buildings with HVAC systems are just as likely to spread illnesses - look at how easily colds spread in the office, even among workers with no close contact. The danger is vastly overstated.

3. "That nonstop flight you booked? We can add a layover to it—without explanation."

Schedules change, routes change, and it's not like similar events don't happen in other industries: your bank can close your branch and make you go to one miles away, right? When you're selling tickets for a year from now, there's bound to be some uncertainty, that's just life.

I do agree that there should be a rule that on international "through" flights where right now the flight has the same number but you actually change aircraft en route, that the carriers should be required to assign the two flights separate numbers and show it for what it truly is - a connection. But this is pretty rare these days.

4. "We wouldn't tell you right away if there's an emergency."

Passengers don't need to know right away that there's a problem - until they either need to know because the airplane's about to do something unusual (descend quickly, change course radically when diverting, etc.) or they need to be ready to take action (brace, evacuate), sometimes it's safer for them not to know. Especially in situations like the captain's death cited in the article - there's nothing the passengers needed to do, and as the crew was busy at the time they didn't really have time to launch into a detailed explanation of exactly why this wasn't really a safety problem...they'd hear "the captain is dead" and start worrying unnecessarily and asking the FAs if the captain and the first officer both had the fish.  Silly

5. "When we let you pick your seat assignment, we were only joking."
Again, routes, schedules, and equipment change - they aren't joking, they're just not psychic. If you buy tickets far in advance, check them occasionally and if the aircraft changes and your seat assignment isn't to your liking (or just disappeared, as happens sometimes), go online or call the airline and ask them to fix it. The use of the word "joking" is really unfair here.

In my experience, nine times out of ten my seat type (aisle vs. window, etc.) has been preserved after a change. The rest have been last-minute changes, and there's only so much the airlines can do. This is not that big of a problem.

6. "Our planes are antiques."
This is where the article gets really misleading, suggesting there's a safety concern with older planes. Absolute crap - the average person doesn't understand that planes just don't age like cars do. Their point that the older planes don't have IFE and such isn't that relevant either, there are plenty of brand new E-jets flying around with no IFE installed.

7. "Our crew is totally exhausted."
This is a problem, and hopefully we'll get some rule changes and tighter enforcement that address it soon. But again, I can't help but think the article overstates the issue.

8. "Your ticket might not be with the airline you booked."
First off, read your itinerary - most of the time codeshares and regional affiliates are identified. (And I do agree the FAA should make that a requirement.) But this is usually not an issue, tens of thousands of fliers take regional jets every day without a problem. I would agree, though, that the ultimate responsibility to fix problems should lie with whoever's code is on the flight - if I buy a ticket on, say, a flight with a CO flight number, on continental.com, my legal relationship is with Continental, not their subcontractor. If my bank outsources processing my checks, and the subcontractor screws up, I don't care - I'm calling my bank and I fully expect them to fix the problem. Airlines should be held to the same standard.


User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets87 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 26394 times:



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):

9) "You now pay for the privilege of having your bags lost or stolen" (Thanks United!)


User currently offlineMaverickM11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 16948 posts, RR: 48
Reply 15, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 26334 times:

"1 Thing A Journalist Will Never Tell You"

He doesn't have a *clue* what he's talking about, but will write an article about it anyway. Yeah sure



E pur si muove -Galileo
User currently offlineFlood From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 1381 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 26324 times:



Quoting MaverickM11 (Reply 15):
"1 Thing A Journalist Will Never Tell You"

alternatively, the dozens of things Microsoft would never tell anyone.


User currently offlineExFATboy From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2974 posts, RR: 9
Reply 17, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 26178 times:



Quoting MaverickM11 (Reply 15):
He doesn't have a *clue* what he's talking about, but will write an article about it anyway.

The scary thing is that this guy actually got quotes from several respected bloggers (Brett Synder from "Cranky Flier", Heather Poole and Kent Wien from "Gadling", etc.) and worked those quotes into otherwise erroneous or sensationalized drivel, or, in Wien's case, exaggerated a completely factual statement ("a crew was cited for making announcements before completing required tasks", or, in other words, "sometimes they have more important things to do") into "the airlines are being secretive", with the implication being that they're not telling you things you actually need to know.

This was so twisted and exaggerated, I automatically presumed it was written by Chris Elliott until I looked at the byline.


User currently offlineAdam42185 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 408 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 25741 times:



Quoting Contrails15 (Reply 11):
Yup, sounds about right. My advice is always try not to pack fragile things in your checked bags and if you have too, take it apon yourself to make sure its secure and protected.

or, if its fragile and not carry-on-able, ship it with fedex or ups and get it insured instead of taking it with you on the plane  bigthumbsup 


User currently offlineLuv2cattlecall From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1650 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 25493 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Reply 3):
Of course it pisses me off what does that guy know about aviation...but he's doing his job getting people to read their articles

I haven't clicked the article...I have no interest in adding to their page views... I have a few gueses at who the author could be: Greenberg, Baesk, or Koeing? Or any combination of the above?

Quoting Contrails15 (Reply 8):
Fragile means nothing to us.

You all can put as many Fragile stickers as you want. Doesn't matter.

Depends on the airline and the airports involved. Certain locations/airlines, I've noticed while watching as a pax, will certainly take care. I had a fragile box with a porcelain lamp, and the nice folks at JAX put it on the side of the belt loader, and waited until the other bags were in before he handed it to the guy inside the hold.

I've noticed that when ground service it outsourced, however...fragile = kick me!



When you have to breaststroke to your connecting flight...it's a crash!
User currently offlineMysterzip From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 162 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 25429 times:

People should really read their tickets and not even the fine print. Most airlines will tell you, especially if you book online, if and when there is a stopover, change of gauge and what kind of plane it is before you buy. Passengers like to complain about the little plane that they were on, but they should research on what they're flying. But they don't.

User currently offlineThegreatRDU From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2310 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 25167 times:



Quoting Luv2cattlecall (Reply 19):
I haven't clicked the article...I have no interest in adding to their page views... I have a few gueses at who the author could be: Greenberg, Baesk, or Koeing? Or any combination of the above?

It was Basek, the generalizations I hate the most



Our Returning Champion
User currently offlineCalebWilliams From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 274 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 25139 times:



Quoting Luv2cattlecall (Reply 19):
I haven't clicked the article...I have no interest in adding to their page views... I have a few gueses at who the author could be: Greenberg, Baesk, or Koeing? Or any combination of the above?

By Alexander Basek, Budget Travel



Caleb Williams MSP AUS STL AMS CPH LGW YYZ
User currently offlineAntoniemey From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 1531 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 24951 times:



Quoting Luv2cattlecall (Reply 19):
I've noticed that when ground service it outsourced, however...fragile = kick me!

Technically that varies from place to place and handling company to handling company as well.  Smile I know when I worked on the ramp I tried to be nice to the fragile stuff... but when you've got 2 guys trying to unload and reload a 757 in 15 minutes in the rain, it goes in as it comes off. (I'd still try and put it somewhere it wouldn't get smooshed, though.)

But GOD did I hate golf clubs... especially the HUGE hard-side golf club containers... you'd think they were made of glass and not metal the way some people pack them.



Make something Idiot-proof, and the Universe will make a more inept idiot.
User currently offlineHAMAD From United Arab Emirates, joined Apr 2000, 1158 posts, RR: 7
Reply 24, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 24366 times:



Quoting ThegreatRDU (Thread starter):
."Airport luggage scales often lie."

you know, at many occasions i check the weight at home, hotel, or where ever, and i go to the airport the weight is always more between 2-3 LBS, and the airline wouldn't cut you a slack. now luckily it didnt matter to me, because i never exceeded the weight except once, however, what if you were at that threshold?

at IAD i was checking in, and the agent told me my bag was heavier by 1LBS. i was like... ummm, i dont have a carry on, except my laptop, and i am not sure what she wanted me to do. she said that i will have to pay (back then it was 2006, were it was only $25) i offered to pay so she went in sarcasm "you want to pay $25 for one LBS?" at that time i said sarcastically in the same tone "Sweetie, its coming from my pocket, so you should be happy, its a profit to the airline" mind you i was on an award upgrade to first class!



PHX - i miss spotting
25 Tdscanuck : As noted above, that's technically true because any air can make you sick. What's doesn't come across (intentionally so, based on the tone) is that a
26 Pilotpip : Plus the air was sterilized at about 700 degrees Celsius before it enters the cabin from an environment incapable of supporting any life. On top of t
27 FLY2HMO : Cabin air is not recirculated one bit in on your average airliner. And the flow rate is so high that the air gets completely replaced many times with
28 BeakerLTN : Is this why when I fart on a plane, it never seems to smell? - and if it does, it goes very quickly - usually before anyone can determine the source?
29 FlyDeltaJets : The operating carrier for any flight is always listed on the ticket.
30 Pagophilus : In the US maybe so, but I suspect the scales in Xi'an, China aren't so accurate. 3-4kg more compared to Guangzhou earlier and Hong Kong later only a
31 Jolau1701 : Antiques to me are 707s, Comets, Concordes, VC10s, DC10s, 727s, any 737 with Pratt and Whitney engines, (Along with anything powered by Pratt and Whi
32 AznCSA4QF744ER : Bravo! Couldn't have said that better myself. Ding Ding Ding!!! It's a regulation actually! I'm surprised they didn't blame the airlines for hiding t
33 Tiger119 : - I have been told several times that the only way airlines will check golf clubs on is when the set is in a hard-side containers. - Why didn't the g
34 Planesmith : I think you'll find he's also a "customer" of the airlines, as such he has the right to question what is being supplied to him and how it is supplied
35 Conti764 : A few days ago there has been an article in a local newspaper about a Belgian, former TNT pilot operating the Bae 146 out of LGG. He claimed he got v
36 Post contains links Oly720man : Long running story about the organophosphates in the lubricants in jet engines. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tricresyl_phosphate http://www.king5.com
37 SuseJ772 : I have never had a problem with this. I have flown well over 160 segments in my life (I know, not a ton, but more than just a vacationer), and picked
38 Antoniemey : Maybe some airlines, but certainly not all. All golf clubs are a pain, but those hard-side containers take up WAY too much room and on some aircraft
39 FLY2HMO : Just do so less often than what it takes to get the air replaced
40 Tdscanuck : Yes, it is. Virtually all of them do, primarily to maintain humidity. Otherwise the air would be dryer than it already is, making flight even more un
41 FlyDeltaJets87 : I've always used a soft case, and the only problem I've had is when United stole the golf clubs and the bag right out of the travel case, and then se
42 Richierich : How about: The young man/woman flying your regional jet today still lives at home with their parents and only makes $25k a year!
43 Force13 : I would cry. Seriously, I feel for ya. I advised my friend who went to RSW to FedEx them to his hotel a few days before he left. It cost a lot more b
44 FLY2HMO : I am aware of that. But... I guess semantics come into play here. When I think recirculation I picture a closed or almost sealed system, like in a fr
45 Type-Rated : I think the problem with stops, etc. on direct flights is a common misconception amongst the public. Most people think a direct flight means a non-sto
46 413X3 : Amen, that should be more of a worry than any inconvenience and half truth listed in this and all other sensationalist articles.
47 Post contains images KGAIflyer : Back on July 5th, I was flying DEN-SLC-IAD on Skywest and Delta. I got to the airport with a 24" rollerbag. The check in person tells me "Your bag is
48 BMI727 : But it isn't because it means that the public can fly for $49.
49 ThegreatRDU : For some reason I don't believe those were the exact words they told you
50 Mayor : Altitude?
51 FLY2HMO : I hope that was a joke
52 KGAIflyer : Ooops! You caught me. The $90 part is correct, though.
53 KGAIflyer : In that case, all airlines serving Denver could be making a killing.
54 Tdscanuck : Gotcha. Yes, in that sense, airplanes don't recirculate air. People hear "recirculate" and think it's just the same air going round and round for 8 h
55 Antoniemey : actually, Denver being a higher elevation, it should weight LESS in Denver.
56 FlyDeltaJets87 : You weigh about 1/2 pound LESS in Denver than at sea-level. No, it'd be airlines serving passengers RETURNING to Denver that would make a killing. If
57 KGAIflyer : Geez Louise! You guys are smartest bunch of fliers I've ever run into.
58 Mayor : OK...for all you paying customers out there, here it is: Direct flight................a flight that goes from origin point to termination point with
59 TheCol : That's a bit of an understatement, which is why those of us in the industry get so frustrated over these articles. There has been no conclusive proof
60 Post contains links CalebWilliams : You're correct. From Wikipedia: Gravity decreases with altitude, since greater altitude means greater distance from the Earth's centre. All other thi
61 FlyDeltaJets87 : I know what it is. That's why I'm saying it's a scam or at least a load of BS. I don't see the difference between a "Direct" flight to Orlando from S
62 Mayor : Well, IF you know the difference, then you'd know that on a direct flight, you don't have to change planes as opposed to the connecting flight you me
63 KGAIflyer : ----------------------------------------------------------- This is all interesting in the absolute. But the cause of my original post was the OP's c
64 Mayor : It was and I should have indicated as such. Then we wouldn't have had to have this high school physics lecture that we're having. Sorry......
65 Reltney : 2. "Our air may make you sick." Biggest joke!!! (This is simplified)The air is the freshest cleanest you could imagine. It is superheated due to compr
66 Post contains images KGAIflyer : Okay. I believe that. But it has always fascinated me that on long flights within single-aisle planes, after a while it seems the air from the bathro
67 Tdscanuck : It probably depends on the specific aircraft, but none that I'm aware of mix air from the air cycle machine with outside air (other than the outside
68 Reltney : It is correct as you put it, I was just making non technical statements. Some people use airline/mechanic/pilot slang. I am a pilot for the majors an
69 KRIC777 : How about: The CLE--DEN flight that you booked on DELTA will be operated by Continental...except it won't be operated on Continental....it will be ope
70 PWMRamper : That isn't entirely true...plane changes happen all the time. United's a classic example of this. While I can't recall any numbers off the top of my
71 FlyDeltaJets87 : Not always true, unless MD-88s have transoceanic range or can magically transform to Boeing 757-200s Just one example: Delta 0174: MCO-JFK-LYS MCO-JF
72 Mayor : Okay, maybe I should have said "domestically".........I believe that "international" is the only time you'll see that happen.....at least on DL. What
73 FlyDeltaJets87 : In other words, the "Direct Flight" is nothing but a marketing scam. The delay in my travel is not in having to walk from A15 to B25 in ATL. The dela
74 Mayor : Explain the "scam" part to me. We used to have a flight that went DCA-ATL-BHM-DFW-DEN-SLC (same a/c......727-200). I doubt if this was marketed as a
75 Mir : 1) You will get fewer FF miles than you would if the two flights were their own flight numbers. 2) As has been pointed out, your travel experience ma
76 Alphaomega : 1. No they don't - they are checked the same as gas pumps 2. Then don't fly... 3. You will know about any stops and revenue stops are not made at the
77 ExFATboy : In fairness to Delta, I just called up DL 1095 on both Delta's web site and Orbitz's. Delta's website does describe it as "1-stop", just like a conne
78 FLY2HMO : I saw what I was getting at though. But I doubt the luggage scales are accurate enough to weigh the difference.
79 Mir : 1-stop is not the same as a connection, though. It implies that the plane lands at an intermediate airport, but will then continue onward (i.e. no ne
80 Mayor : They've been using the terms "direct" and "non-stop" long before they had a FF program. So, how is it a scam? Are you telling me that when you get on
81 BMI727 : I think that most of the sickness worries on planes is due to being in close proximity to many people (of often questionable hygiene) for an extended
82 Mir : Which isn't really relevant to the issue. I'm sure people realize that they're getting a stopover. I'm not sure that many realize that they're not go
83 Mayor : Why is that? To me, it makes more sense to have one flight number, that can be booked all the way thru. Saves space in the computer, too. Sure it is.
84 Post contains images ExFATboy : Delta's website uses the description "1-stop" for connections as well, and clearly says "change planes", so it is not trying to pass this off as a "d
85 Flashmeister : My thoughts? The article is pretty worthless -- an example of "new content" in the interest of making the site look "fresh" without really looking at
86 FlyDeltaJets87 : My reasoning for it being a "scam", or at least "False advertising" is that airlines will use it to say at airports "Direct service to _______, _____
87 Mir : There is a difference between using the terms to mislead the customers and inventing the terms to mislead the customers. I do not think that the term
88 BMI727 : But it is direct service to those cities. If passengers refuse to educate themselves on the terminology or read their tickets, why is that the airlin
89 Viscount724 : The difference is that passengers are less likely to be aware that on "change-of-gauge" flights using a single number but involving two different air
90 FlyDeltaJets87 : But why bring up the potential conflict in the first place when there's no reason to have it and every opportunity to avoid it? Airlines know how dem
91 Mayor : Exactly.......in the example used they can book pax from MCO thru to LHR, using the same flight number.....that may put it ahead of other airlines co
92 Viscount724 : Most people would only consider the "direct" definition as covering a through flight with a single aircraft all the way, regardless of stops. Once th
93 FlyDeltaJets87 : Again, the question is, what is the value gained for the customer in this practice? I understand the definition you are giving. But I still don't get
94 F9fan : I wonder if the author of the article that started this whole fascinating thread knows that airlines traditionally hold back reserving some seats to
95 Mir : Except if there is a change of aircraft involved - then it's not direct and you might as well have a connection. I have no problem with direct flight
96 PWMRamper : Well with the direct flight, if your outbound is late and it's not an aircraft swap you KNOW you won't be missing your connecting flight...as it's go
97 FlyDeltaJets87 : By aircraft swap do you mean "Equipment Sub" or "Change Planes"? If it's the latter, see Below: After all, I already described a situation in which I
98 Tiger119 : - The main reason(s) I keep a set at a family's residence close to FMY and one here in Indy. It's a pain for me as a passenger and I know it is a pai
99 Mayor : There may not be as much perceived "value" to the customer but there might be more value to the carrier. The value to the customer may be in not havi
100 FlyDeltaJets87 : I'm going all the way to RDU anyway, with a stop in ATL already. This new "Direct" flight does not change that. Which as shown, already has to be don
101 BMI727 : Only the passengers who don't pay attention. Anyway, here are the truths I think can be gained from the conversation. 1. A nonstop flight is just tha
102 Mayor : Well, this is the first thing we agree on. The origin station will load the bags according to the destination. Lets say they, using your example, RDU
103 FlyDeltaJets87 : Well thanks for explaining that. That does make sense, assuming there is sufficient baggage on the "Direct" route to warrant allocating a whole bin f
104 Mayor : You're welcome. Even if there were only two bags going from RDU to DAB, they would still load them separately. They might be behind other bags....say
105 USPIT10L : Usually, we'd put through bags like that in bin 2, where nothing else would be loaded, even if we only had two or three bags. The most through bags I
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