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Passenger Information Released By Airline  
User currently offlineVenezuela747 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1428 posts, RR: 5
Posted (5 years 1 month 4 hours ago) and read 1991 times:

My dad was flying yesterday afternoon. Well to make a long story short he missed his connecting flight and he was on stand-by for a later flight. Since he didn't call me to tell me whether he had gotten on or not I called Continental to ask them if he did. Well the first time the lady told me they needed either a record locator, ticket number or the credit card number it was bought with in order to release information about a passenger. But then once I found that stuff I went back and called again and they did not ask me anything just where he was going and his name. So who did the right thing here, the first or the second operator?


ROLL TIDE!!!
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNkops From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2669 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (5 years 1 month 4 hours ago) and read 1933 times:

I would say the first operator was correct.. I was always told you cannot give out pax info due to Privacy Act.


I have no association with Spirit Airlines
User currently offlineMSYPI7185 From United States of America, joined Oct 2007, 710 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 1449 times:

I agree with Nkops. I would say the first operator was correct. I have always been told from day one, you can only tell if they hold a reservation for a flight, not whether or not they are onboard. Of course this was due to Privacy, however I also wonder to what extent that was company policy. In all my years I never asked, not that it would have mattered.

MD


User currently offlineAznCSA4QF744ER From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 692 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 1434 times:



Quoting MSYPI7185 (Reply 2):
Of course this was due to Privacy, however I also wonder to what extent that was company policy. In all my years I never asked, not that it would have mattered.

It's to protect the passenger flying/holding reservation. A couple of years ago at LAX, CX had a very interesting situation too. A Vietnamese male passenger was traveling on them to SGN via HKG. His wife knew that he was flying but couldn't figure which airlines. She called all airlines operating out of LAX to SGN. To make story short, she found out he's flying on CX. After being arrested by airport police and questioned why she was beating her husband. They found out that the reservation agent gave her the information.


User currently offlineMSYPI7185 From United States of America, joined Oct 2007, 710 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (5 years 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 1408 times:



Quoting AznCSA4QF744ER (Reply 3):
To make story short, she found out he's flying on CX. After being arrested by airport police and questioned why she was beating her husband. They found out that the reservation agent gave her the information.

I have heard of similar situations, and others where a UM is traveling and there is a custody dispute on going. I agree with the policy and understand why it exist.


User currently offlineLHR380 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (5 years 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 1367 times:

Good old Date Protection Act.

Had a guy not very happy with me the other day for the same thing. Wanted some info on a booking, and as he was not named in it said no and (Politely) explained the act to him that Im unable to pass on any information.


User currently offlineAirNz From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (5 years 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1297 times:



Quoting MSYPI7185 (Reply 2):
I have always been told from day one, you can only tell if they hold a reservation for a flight, not whether or not they are onboard.

 checkmark  correct indeed. The only exclusion for giving information of a passenger on board (and only after passing the initial privacy questions) is a minimum of 30 minutes after a flight lands.

Quoting LHR380 (Reply 5):
Good old Date Protection Act.

Actually, it has more to do with privacy/security (and am not talking about 'terrorism') than the actual Data Protection Act.


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