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Boeing Reports Third-Quarter Financial Results  
User currently offlineOykie From Norway, joined Jan 2006, 2732 posts, RR: 4
Posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 7303 times:

Main points


• Third-quarter revenue was $16.7 billion, 9 percent higher than last year's strike-affected quarter
• Loss of $2.23 per share reflects $3.59 per share of expenses related to previously announced 787 cost reclassification and 747 charge, partially offset by solid performance in other commercial programs and the defense business
• Operating cash flow increased to $1.2 billion
• Backlog at $320 billion - nearly five times current annual revenues
• 2009 guidance updated for 787 cost reclassification and 747 charge


Read more here:http://boeing.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=891

Is it in this report that Boeing will shed light about a possible further 787 delay?

Anyway, it is nice to see Boeing performing good one year afte the economic melt down.

[Edited 2009-10-21 04:40:52 by oyKIE]


Dream no small dream; it lacks magic. Dream large, then go make that dream real - Donald Douglas
60 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineOyKIE From Norway, joined Jan 2006, 2732 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 7260 times:



Quoting Oykie (Thread starter):
Is it in this report that Boeing will shed light about a possible further 787 delay?

I was too quick in publishing the report and dit not see, that Boeing remains on track

Quote:
The 787 program has begun the previously announced reinforcement to an area within the side-of-body joint. First flight of the airplane remains on track to occur by the end of 2009, with first delivery scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2010.




Dream no small dream; it lacks magic. Dream large, then go make that dream real - Donald Douglas
User currently offlineOyKIE From Norway, joined Jan 2006, 2732 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 7199 times:



Quoting Oykie (Thread starter):
Anyway, it is nice to see Boeing performing good one year afte the economic melt down.

Commenting this. Even though they posted a loss, that is mainly because of the 787 747-8 delays.



Dream no small dream; it lacks magic. Dream large, then go make that dream real - Donald Douglas
User currently offlineKeesje From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 7123 times:

Were there Q & A's from the press ?

User currently offlineKappel From Suriname, joined Jul 2005, 3533 posts, RR: 17
Reply 4, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 7124 times:

Wow, you have a whole thread for yourself, lol.

Sucks to see Boeing in the red, but so was Airbus during the a380 delays IIRC. I really hope that 2010 is a much better year for them, with first flight (still in 2009 hopefully) of both the 787 and 748 (and maybe, just maybe also first delivery of both)



L1011,733,734,73G,738,743,744,752,763,772,77W,DC855,DC863,DC930,DC950,MD11,MD88,306,319,320,321,343,346,ARJ85,CR7,E195
User currently offlineMainland From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 309 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 7075 times:



Quoting Keesje (Reply 3):
Were there Q & A's from the press ?

The conference call with investors is today at 10:30 eastern. Link to listen in:

http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix....=irol-EventDetails&EventId=2480499



You don't need a passport to know what state you're in...
User currently offlineKeesje From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 6916 times:

I guess everybody is a bit tired of announcement that are revised shortly after, discussions about costs and who blames who. I want smoking tires, howling engines, sliding tail blocks and shiny worldtours..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmRKSv73lZg

wrong link..

[Edited 2009-10-21 06:33:54 by keesje]

User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30884 posts, RR: 86
Reply 7, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 6727 times:
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Conference Notes:

Jim McNerney

ZA001, ZA002 and ZA003 are now Research & Development frames and $2.6 billion in R&D and production costs have been assigned to them.

787 Side-of-Body fix is proceeding and the final changes to the four problem stringers will be completed this week(?) and then installation can continue.

747-8F required significant re-work at both PAE and suppliers due to constrained engineering sources. 747-8F production rate will not be increased per plan due to the soft cargo market. Third frame production is proceeding much more smoothly than the first and second. The first two planes have completed Power-On.

747-8 Intercontinental has reached the 75% mark for engineering drawing release.

7200 HR positions reduced in 2009. By 2010 headcount should be down over 10,000 from November 2008.

113 commercial deliveries in Q3 2009 with an additional 85 planned Q3 commercial deliveries deferred to later quarters. 130 commercial deliveries deferred in H1 2009. Current deferrals run about the same as 2008.

[Edited 2009-10-21 07:43:52]

User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30884 posts, RR: 86
Reply 8, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6638 times:
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Investor Questions One:

Q: How will you manage concurrent 787 and 747-8 flight test and production before first delivery?

A: Organizationally, we have combined our flight test groups to allow us greater flexibility and coordination to perform both schedules per plan. On inventory build, by first delivery we believe will have a total of 30 787s and 747-8s completed prior to that milestone.

Q: Unless R&D declines materially, how will Boeing grow earnings over the next 3-4 years?

A: When we get to an end-state of the current transition, we will have a more competitive company. IDS is improving gross margins and the 787 and 747-8 should build on a solid 737/777 foundation.

Q: Is the original 787 profit case still valid with the delays and higher costs based on the original discounts and cost escalation clauses?

A: Even with all of the compensation claims, there is room to do better.

Q: What went wrong with Boeing's processes at designing and building commercial airplanes?

A: The market for new planes grew overheated and we went to an aggressive development schedule with increased outsourcing on the 787 to meet it, resulting in a "bleeding edge" development and production process which we are now recovering from. Going forward, we cannot overreach ourselves to meet unrealistically set goals and we need to bring more of the engineering back into Boeing and improve engineering oversight and management within Boeing and the suppliers. We also need greater visibility of partners and suppliers.

Q: Is there an engineering shortage within the company?

A: The quick answer is no. The 747-8F engineering issues were more a result of both that and the 787 reaching their "engineering peak" at the same time as opposed to two separate peaks so the manpower planning ended up being different than planned which resulted in reality getting in the way of planning and we need to better manage "surge capacity".


User currently offlineManfredj From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1132 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6572 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 8):
Going forward, we cannot overreach ourselves to meet unrealistically set goals and we need to bring more of the engineering back into Boeing and improve engineering oversight and management within Boeing and the suppliers.

That's interesting. We've been discussing this for a few months now. This outsourcing is the direction the world is going in and I'm not convinced it works when building aircraft.

Bring the engineering back, weed out the needless supply chain to gain more strength and control over the build process.

It's ok to "experiment" with outsourcing, but when you begin to see it isn't a profitable, maneagable build method, go back to what works best.

In terms of outsourcing, what percentage has 787 seen in comparison to other aircraft like the 777?

[Edited 2009-10-21 08:27:31 by manfredj]


757: The last of the best
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30884 posts, RR: 86
Reply 10, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6505 times:
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Investor Questions Two:

Q: How are you working through 787 supplier claims in general? What is the nature in the way you take these large claims and settle them? And considering the original planes are far more expensive than planned, how will unit price escalations affect future deliveries?

A: The costs of building the first tranche of planes will be higher and we have accounted for that. We will do detailed cost-analysis on later tranches and we believe we have a pretty good handle on those costs and believe they will be better than we originally planned. We have a great deal of time due to the forecast demand to settle these over time.

Q: Are you confident IDS will be able to maintain 10%+ margins going forward?

A: As the volume decreases, there will be pressure to maintain margins at 10%, but we feel we can still maintain them through continually driving productivity and contract negotiations.

Q: Will the 787 still fly by year end with the fix in process?

A: We expect and believe it will, even as we continue to work with issues as we factored those issues in.

Q: Has Jim Albraugh expressed any worries about the 787 flight and production schedules?

A: He has accepted the flight test and production programs. He feels the flight test program can and probably will create new issues, but they feel they're ready for them if and when they do happen.

Q: You mentioned 85 Q3 deferrals. How does this affect your confidence for future 737 and 777 production rates?

A: We feel we're okay with the 777 program with the planned production rate reduction. 737 deferrals are running to what we planned and we feel that the 737 rate can remain stable with those deferrals. We feel that delivery demand in 2011 and 2012 is trending towards increase, not decrease.

Q: Are you finding it difficult to pull customers forward to meet deferrals?

A: No. We're sufficiently oversold on both programs to allow us to find customers who want deliveries ahead of plan to meet those that wish to defer. We're sufficiently oversold in 2010 to handle all predicted deferrals and also have enough in 2011 to handle some early deferrals.

Q: When will the six 787s fly and can you sell the final three?

A: ZA004, ZA005 and ZA006 remain marketable. We expect one new test plane entering the test rotation every month once ZA001 takes to the air.


User currently offlineAstuteman From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 10000 posts, RR: 96
Reply 11, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6492 times:



Quoting Manfredj (Reply 9):
We've been discussing this for a few months now. This outsourcing is the direction the world is going in and I'm not convinced it works when building aircraft.

It certainly doesn't do work if you haven't developed the necessary core competencies needed to manage it properly in a timely manner. That doesn't necessarily mean it doesn't work.

I suspect you'll see a period of some re-trenchment, as suggested, followed by a somewhat more cautious continuation of the outsourcing process.

In the modern world of industrial offsets, I suspect it isn't going to go away any time soon....

Quoting Stitch (Reply 8):
Q: Is the original 787 profit case still valid with the delays and higher costs based on the original discounts and cost escalation clauses?

A: Even with all of the compensation claims, there is room to do better.

That explains everything....  scratchchin   faint 

Rgds


User currently offlineTarheelwings From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 209 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6446 times:



Quoting Stitch (Reply 10):
We expect and believe it will, even as we continue to work with issues as we factored those issues in.

This comment is key, is it not? He's saying they still believe they'll fly the 787 by year end as the issues that have sprung up were expected and more importantly, planned for (in terms of schedule).


User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30884 posts, RR: 86
Reply 13, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6437 times:
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Investor Questions Three:

Q: Is 2010 currently sold out in terms of commercial deliveries?

A: 2010 is indeed sold out and we feel that the levels of deferrals has stayed stable enough that we have enough oversolds in the pipeline to maintain production.

Q: There has been some talk in the marketplace that Boeing has an advantage in the KC-X RFP?

A: We're still looking through the RFP so we don't know at this time if or how the RFP helps or hinders us. We do believe that the WTO has ruled that the playing field is not level between Boeing and Airbus and that should allow Airbus an advantage to take more risk on in meeting the KC-X RFP then Boeing can.

Q: Every few months we hear confident statements on 787 schedule and program developments. Then we hear that things are not so rosy. Where does the buck stop on all these program delays?

A: The entire leadership of the company is involved in getting the 787 to market and we all share responsibility in it not going as smoothly as possible, but we also all share the responsibility to make it happen.

Q: On the second 787 line, is the decision down to Everett and South Carolina? Or are you looking at other sites? And do you intend to announce the decision soon?

A: We have narrowed the location for the second line down to those two sites and will make a decision within a few weeks.

Q: (Jim Wallace from the Seattle Times) Why would you consider putting a second line in South Carolina which to many people seems to increase the program risk, as opposed to reducing it?

A: There would be execution risks, however South Carolina is a major 787 production site right now. We feel diversifying our labor pool and relationship has benefits. We have had problems with the IAM and I need to figure out a way to reduce those risks. So compared to a strike, the extra costs of having two disparate lines is far less. We don't feel the union alone is at fault, as we have not been able to come to an agreement with them, but we feel that without the strike, the company and the 787 would be in a better financial position today.

[End of Q&A]


User currently offlineManfredj From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1132 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6419 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 10):
A: He has accepted the flight test and production programs. He feels the flight test program can and probably will create new issues, but they feel they're ready for them if and when they do happen.

Oh my. Is this a hint of things to come or a safety net in case they do occur? Are there always problems after and during the flight test program?

Quoting Astuteman (Reply 11):
It certainly doesn't do work if you haven't developed the necessary core competencies needed to manage it properly in a timely manner.

The delays certainly were the end result of mismanagement, but was South Carolina an attempt at stopping the bleeding, or did that come before the delays?

[Edited 2009-10-21 08:53:31 by manfredj]


757: The last of the best
User currently offlineDallasnewark From Estonia, joined Nov 2005, 495 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6408 times:



Quoting Astuteman (Reply 11):
It certainly doesn't do work if you haven't developed the necessary core competencies needed to manage it properly in a timely manner. That doesn't necessarily mean it doesn't work.

The only benefit of outsourcing is that it is cheaper, but the qulaity of work is not the same, usually the quality is a lot worse. It is true for every industry, call centers, IT, technical support, it is cheaper to outsource but the quality provided form that is subpar to put it nicely.

Why don't you call AA or DL and get one of their agents from the offshore and ask them a question a bit more complicated than travel from point A to point B and you will see how fast you would be trasnfered back to the onshore operator.



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User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30884 posts, RR: 86
Reply 16, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6368 times:
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Quoting Manfredj (Reply 9):
In terms of outsourcing, what percentage has 787 seen in comparison to other aircraft like the 777?

It was close to 100% on production. Prior to taking over Vought's production, about the only thing Boeing built for the 787 is the vertical fin and some fairings and the gear doors. I'm not sure on the engineering side.

As for the 777, Japan alone provides 35% of the parts.



Quoting Astuteman (Reply 11):
That explains everything...

James Bell said that they felt that even with the compensation, the program overall is still profitable even though profits will be pressured on the first tranche of planes.

Right now it looks that Boeing plans to spend about $750,000 per frame on compensation this year.



Quoting Tarheelwings (Reply 12):
This comment is key, is it not? He's saying they still believe they'll fly the 787 by year end as the issues that have sprung up were expected and more importantly, planned for (in terms of schedule).

Yes.

But then, they've consistently said this before and somehow they continue to keep falling behind.


User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30884 posts, RR: 86
Reply 17, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6350 times:
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Quoting Manfredj (Reply 14):
Oh my. Is this a hint of things to come or a safety net in case they do occur? Are there always problems after and during the flight test program?

It's a safety net as the chances of the 787 test program being perfect is very slim.


User currently offlineDougbr2006 From Brazil, joined Oct 2006, 391 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6318 times:



Quoting Stitch (Reply 7):
787 Side-of-Body fix is proceeding and the final changes to the four problem stringers will be completed this week(?) and then installation can continue.

So the bloggers again prove to be correct, if it wasn't the design would be final and verification would be almost done. Boeing are great at mincing their words to give indirect - well, errr, maybe answers. I noticed also they didn't like talking mush to John of Flight International alias Flightblogger!!! your call is distorted well at least in my ears I heard every word the first time !!!!


User currently offlineTarheelwings From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 209 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6304 times:



Quoting Stitch (Reply 16):
But then, they've consistently said this before and somehow they continue to keep falling behind.

Understood, and I agree that has been the pattern in the recent past. But maybe this time Boeing have learned their lesson and have built in additional schedule to deal with "unforseen" issues?


User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30884 posts, RR: 86
Reply 20, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 6100 times:
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Quoting Tarheelwings (Reply 19):
But maybe this time Boeing have learned their lesson and have built in additional schedule to deal with "unforseen" issues?

Alas,  no .

They consistently said they built in enough "schedule padding" to ensure they could make first flight by the end of June.


User currently offlineTomB From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 5995 times:

I am not a big fan of outsourcing the major components of the airframe. Boeing did outsource a major investment in the capital expenditures for mandrells, tape laying machines and autoclaves to subcontractors. However, over the years Boeing will pay for the those capital expenditures as those amortized costs will have to be included in the price of the major components purchased by Boeing.

By using outsourcing for major components, Boeing incurs significant other expenses:
1) they have to have a highly qualified management team providing oversight of the subcontranctor,
2) they have to have a highly paid team of contract negotiators continually negotiating contracts and change orders witht the subcontractors.
3) and the after the major component is finished, they have to inspect the components and then fly it thousands of miles in the Dreamlifter to reach the final assembly point.

I believe the three oversight and transportation costs listed above could pay for a large amount of direct labor if Boeing manufactured the major airframe components in house. If Boeing manufactured major components in house, they would have to step up and make a major investment in capital equipment to manufacture fuselage barrels and wings, but the manufacturing processes are largely automated. The direct labor component of manufacturing the major airframe components is not that high and I believe could be be completely offset if Boeing did not have to pay for the oversight of subcontractors.

I estimate that the cost of direct labor in the United States, Italy and Japan is roughly the same and you do not reduce your total direct labor costs by subcontracting to Italy and Japan.

Going forward, I would thus recommend that Boeing do most of the engineering in house and produced all of the major airframe components at the same location where final assembly will occur. It will increase capital expenditures for aircraft programs but give them a much more efficient production process that will save them a lot of money over the life of the aircraft program.

And finally, I would recommend that Boeing separate the R&D and prototype timeline from the commercial production timeline. Boeing has incurred billions and billions of unnecessary expenses because they tried to start commercial production before they had a proven prototype.

Boeing has really mismanaged the 787 program but perphaps they can learn from all of their mistakes and successfully manage the 777 and 737 replacement programs.


User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 5798 times:



Quoting Manfredj (Reply 9):
That's interesting. We've been discussing this for a few months now. This outsourcing is the direction the world is going in and I'm not convinced it works when building aircraft.

Why should it be invalid, or not work, solely for building aircraft? It works for other's so why imply it doesn't work just because Boeing got it wrong for the 787?

Quoting Dallasnewark (Reply 15):
The only benefit of outsourcing is that it is cheaper, but the qulaity of work is not the same, usually the quality is a lot worse. It is true for every industry, call centers, IT, technical support, it is cheaper to outsource but the quality provided form that is subpar to put it nicely.

That is a very generalised statement and in no way definitively true. A lot involves very inaccurate perception.

Quoting Dallasnewark (Reply 15):
Why don't you call AA or DL and get one of their agents from the offshore and ask them a question a bit more complicated than travel from point A to point B and you will see how fast you would be trasnfered back to the onshore operator.

Perhap you should rephrase that a little better, because I can absolutely assure you that American agents are in no way 'superior' in travel knowledge just because they are American! There are several factors involved there, so perhaps you should research them first!!


User currently offlineRheinbote From Germany, joined May 2006, 1968 posts, RR: 53
Reply 23, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 5480 times:



Quoting Stitch (Reply 7):
87 Side-of-Body fix is proceeding and the final changes to the four problem stringers will be completed this week(?)

First, thanks for the transcript, Stitch.

I think he said that the design of the side-of-body fix will be concluded this week.


User currently offlineAircellist From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1718 posts, RR: 8
Reply 24, posted (4 years 10 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 5302 times:



Quoting Rheinbote (Reply 23):
First, thanks for the transcript, Stitch.

I second.

Quoting Stitch (Reply 16):
Right now it looks that Boeing plans to spend about $750,000 per frame on compensation this year.

Sounds like a very small amount of money... ? How many months of dry-leasing of a 763 or an A332 would it provide?


25 Banjo76 : I know it's totally OT but it strikes my attention in every thread. Are "than" and "then" the same in English? I've always been taught that saying "yo
26 ER757 : Maybe I am reading a bit too much between the lines but this sounds to me like if there is indeed a 2nd production line opened, it's a done deal that
27 EPA001 : Me too. A very interesting reading. Hope they can live up to the "end of this year promises" regarding first flight of the B787.
28 Stitch : I understood it to mean that they were installing the stringers that they know (or at least believe) will meet the 150% test and that for the four th
29 Astuteman : Please feel free to speak from the point of view of the service industries that you quote. But this is manufacturing/construction, and too many major
30 ER757 : That's a good take on it too. I just don't see the IAM agreeing to that one though, do you?
31 Stitch : They may not do so in the belief that Boeing is either bluffing, or the hope that if Boeing does place the second line in South Carolina, it will con
32 ER757 : I agree with your analysis and while I have no personal connection to Boeing and don't have a strong opinion on pro or anti-union, I'll just say that
33 UAL747DEN : I'm glad to see them admitting they have a problem and talking about how they will fix it. Music to my ears! This is a GREAT idea, they need to get a
34 Scipio : Wrong. The basic rationale for outsourcing is that specialized companies can produce specific inputs better and cheaper. Airplanes are highly complex
35 Stitch : The union is dependent on Boeing surviving, as well. If Boeing went bankrupt and closed up shop, those worker's skills are likely not going to be of
36 EbbUK : I am reading the same text [thanks Stitch for transcript] and I don't see any admittance of problem. Yes there is talk of fixing it. How arrogant is
37 AirNz : Surely that comment begs the question of why did they set "unrealistically set goals" in the first place.......and by whom exactly? And you're going
38 Stitch : They said so in their reply - the airlines wanted the 787 very badly so Boeing pushed as hard as they could to get it into the air to meet that deman
39 Pellegrine : I came in late to the call this morning, but all the while I was thinking this is "more of the same" from management. Boeing hasn't been through rehab
40 Pnwtraveler : I listened to the call but was multi-tasking. So thanks very much Stitch for the printed Q & A, it was very helpful to be able to go back and read you
41 Tarheelwings : I too am reading the same statement and can't understand why you don't see the admittance of a problem. When Boeing make the following statement: "go
42 B777fan : Correct Here's one way to use them both that illustrates the difference. "If you do better than me, then I will admit defeat."
43 UAL747DEN : Of course they admitted the problem and said that they are addressing it. They said that the market for new new aircraft grew overheated and this was
44 EbbUK : that's all about what we are doing now and in future. No admittance of responsibility at Boeing for what happened rather than "the market". As writte
45 Banjo76 : A no strike clause is Italy is against not just laws, even the consitution sanctions the right to strike. Has a no strike clause legal consequencies
46 Sxf24 : You actually don't; however, you significantly reduce your labor risk.
47 Tarheelwings : So what would satisfy you.....a public flogging? self inmolation? beheadings? While your concern for Boeing shareholders is touching, worry not! We (
48 EbbUK : Well to say that this is why the 787 is delayed is a novel argument. To bolster it with proof about cancellations and deferrals in the current econom
49 Stitch : No it does not. If the union membership ratify such a clause, it's perfectly legal. This morning's Seattle Times ran a front page article noting that
50 A10warthog : The IAM currently has a "no strike" clause. As long as there is a contract there will be no strike. Now Boeing wants to extend the current contract un
51 Post contains links Rheinbote : Full transcript here: http://seekingalpha.com/article/1679...9-earnings-call-transcript?page=-1
52 Stitch : Thanks for that transcript, Rheinbote. Since I can't believe it cost Boeing $900 million a frame to build ZA001, ZA002 and ZA003, I am guessing the $2
53 Stitch : Unfortunately, I think that the IAM doesn't have any real leverage. I'm pretty convinced Boeing has already chosen Charleston and the only way they w
54 Travelhound : Yes, but outsourcing as per the 787 was very much a new frontier. It was a philosophical change in the development and building of an airplane (for B
55 Stitch : When we speak of "outsourcing", we should clarify how it applies to the 787 in a way it didn't apply to other Boeing commercial airliner programs. The
56 EPA001 : That is a very good clarification on the differences in outsourcing the work at Boeing. Thanks for the information Stitch.
57 AirNz : Sorry, but I'm afraid that I'm not 'distorting' anything at all. In answer to a comment that outsourcing does not work, I clearly stated that it work
58 Maxter : I'm framing this, really I am... I wish I could add you to my RU list, but I don't have enough posts yet. Great post. thanks.
59 EPA001 : Indeed it is a great post which does not need commenting. It basically says it all. Now let's get that B787 in the air a.s.a.p.
60 Tdscanuck : I don' t think it alters the financial basis of the program in any way...Boeing said that the write-down didn't change their cash position at all. Th
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