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Please Comfort Me... UA 757's Age - Safe To Fly?  
User currently offlineGumah From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 143 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 20741 times:

Hello everyone,

I'm a fearful flyer who hasn't flown since 2007. I am flying on Dec. 9th from SNA - ORD on a 757, and I'm a little bit concerned at the age of this aircraft. It appears as though they are all close to 20 years old!

I would like to know, generally speaking, how these aircraft are maintained. I realize they fly several of these all over the country on a daily basis, however, as someone who is in constant hell while flying I still let a lot of "bs" thoughts creep in my head.

Please forgive my ignorance if my question is silly or stupid, just looking for some reassurance! Thanks in advance for your replies!

Big sissy in SoCal.

86 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15444 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 20754 times:

There are plenty of planes far older than that still flying safely. Just because a plane is old does not make it less safe. A proper maintenance program can keep an airliner flying safely for well beyond 20 years.


Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineCchan From New Zealand, joined May 2003, 1753 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 20723 times:

A well maintained 20 years old 757 is safer than a 1 year old 777 with poor maintenance.

You will be fine.


User currently offlineYYZRWY23 From Canada, joined Aug 2009, 561 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 20693 times:



Quoting BMI727 (Reply 1):
A proper maintenance program can keep an airliner flying safely for well beyond 20 years.

Or 40 years in the case of the NW DC-9's iirc.

Planes were and still are built to last. Very safe, and the 757 has a formidable safety record.

Enjoy your flight.

YYZRWY23



If you don't stand behind our troops, feel free to stand in front of them.
User currently offlineRbgso From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 585 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 20690 times:

I wouldn't hesitate to fly on this or any other aircraft flying in the US for a major or regional carrier. Assuming UA has followed the rules, the plane will be perfectly safe.

It may be cosmetically challenged, however, but don't let that concern you...........


User currently offlineLonghornmaniac From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 3242 posts, RR: 45
Reply 5, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20598 times:

Hey,

No need to worry, you've come to the right place!

The reality is, it's A LOT more than "several" aircraft that are over 20 years old, and, obviously, they're all reaching point B just fine! Nearly all airlines have aircraft in service that were built in 1989, or before! That's really not an "old" number, so to speak, as certain airlines (looking at you NW/DL) are still operating DC-9s, some of which are approaching twice that.

The age of the plane isn't nearly as important as the maintenance. I've flown on a DC-3 that was built in 1937, and didn't have a single second thought about it!

The maintenance process is a very complicated, but unbelievably thorough. The C-check, which occurs at a regular interval (not sure, maybe once every 6 months?), essentially takes the entire plane apart, looking for any flaws, then puts it back together from the ground up. It's really pretty amazing. Maintenance, however, occurs on a daily basis. People are constantly looking for flaws or anomalies, so there really isn't much to worry about! Make sure you say a little prayer before you get in your car, though!  

You must remember that although the airframe is 20 years old, I'd be willing to wager there are very few parts on that plane that are actually 20 years old. Engines, nuts, bolts, etc... are all replaced throughout the life of an airplane, so as long as the plane is maintained (which they are!), the plane is virtually as safe as the day it first took to the skies!

As an aside, are you familiar with the departure out of SNA? It's fairly different from a standard departure, due to noise restrictions along the beach, so if you aren't, let us know, and we'll make sure you're ready for everything!

Just remember to take a deep breath, and recall that the plane you're boarding had to have just landed safely from somewhere.

We're here to help, so feel free to ask anything!   

Cheers,
Cameron

[Edited 2009-11-12 13:38:54]

User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22299 posts, RR: 20
Reply 6, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20563 times:



Quoting Rbgso (Reply 4):
It may be cosmetically challenged, however, but don't let that concern you...........

 checkmark 

Odds are that the interior will NOT be nice - but that doesn't make it unsafe.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineCanadianNorth From Canada, joined Aug 2002, 3387 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20548 times:

I do maintenance on 25-40 year old airliners on pretty much a daily basis. As long as they are properly maintained (I would find it incredibly hard to believe that an airline such as United wouldn't) flying around in older airliners is still far safer than the drive to the airport.

And age shouldn't matter really anyway, as airliners go through scheduled checks on a regular basis, where the aircraft is basically stripped down to almost nothing and then put back together again every couple years to look for and repair any cracks, corrosion, etc, that might cause any kind of failure. Also many of the important components are replaced at set intervals and either overhauled or retired (as a random example say if Boeing figures part A will last at least 30,000 hours before anything goes seriously wrong with it, they will make it mandatory that you remove it and install a newer one at no later than 20,000 hours).

So for the most part a 20 year old 757 is just as safe as a brand new 757...



CanadianNorth



What could possibly go wrong?
User currently offlineRussianJet From Kyrgyzstan, joined Jul 2007, 7623 posts, RR: 23
Reply 8, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20455 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Just be grateful you get to fly on such a cool plane!


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinePlaneAdmirer From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 551 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20440 times:

They are great planes and well maintained. I love flying 757's more than any other. The take offs can be wonderful, and should be out of SNA. You should climb out quickly and strongly. Listen to Channel 9 to hear the pilots talk to air traffic control (you may want to ask when you board if they will have it on as it is optional). You will hear them calmly and professionally talking with ATC and she just climbs.

Have a great flight.


User currently offlineWjcandee From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 4968 posts, RR: 18
Reply 10, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20399 times:

You will be flying on one of my absolutely favorite airliners. The 757 is a wonderfully-advanced aircraft, even if it is 20 years old. The aircraft's systems are very pilot friendly, it is a very powerful aircraft (which can be important in some emergencies, but otherwise just fun, like stepping on the gas in a car with a big V8), and its safety record is absolutely-excellent.

Your bio suggests that you're relatively young, which means a different perspective on age. When I was in law school in the early 1980s, I would fly back and forth to Chicago on Midway Airlines, which flew some new-ish (then) DC9s, as well as some that had been manufactured in the late 1960s. Back then, a 20-year-old airliner seemed OLD!!! I was amazed that the pilots would still fly it! I had a friend who flew 727s for American, and I couldn't understand why he wasn't afraid of such an OLD airliner -- heck, it was made when I was 6!!!

For a time, I didn't like to get on DC10s, because the media told me they were "unsafe". I rode with my boss to LA from Dallas once on a DC10. I couldn't understand why he wasn't afraid! I told myself that he just didn't appreciate how dangerous all this sitting-in-the-air-in-a-metal-tube was.

Now, of course, the bad fashions and weak music of the 80s are ancient history, but with my current perspective on things, 20 years isn't that long a time!

I have also had my share of near-death experiences, and the sadness of deaths of others. I realize how dangerous it is to drive, or to be a pedestrian in New York City, and how death can come from nowhere in the form of something falling from the sky or something like cancer. We're not getting out of this alive, and we might as well have some fun while we're here, as long as we're not reckless about it. And flying commercial isn't reckless: Nobody I know (except a stunt pilot who was a childhood friend) has died in an aviation accident.

Also, having some perspective on flying now, I realize how freakin' safe it is. I really look foward to it with relish and gusto, and am a little sad when it's all over. I look forward to the acceleration of takeoff, and the cruise to the ground upon landing. I realize that I will never achieve these kinds of speeds driving myself, nor will I otherwise have the opportunity to soar with the eagles. I'm sitting in a CHAIR in the SKY! (as one comedian points out) How cool is that?

And it's safer than crossing the street. That's even cooler.


User currently offlineSteex From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 1564 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20371 times:

I will echo everyone else here that safety should not be in question at all and that a 20-year old bird still has plenty of life left in it. Take it from me, I scheduled a trip this past weekend specifically to fly on two different NW DC-9-40's that were both on the other side of 40 years in service!

User currently offlineHomer71 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 2239 posts, RR: 15
Reply 12, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20347 times:

I guarantee your plane will reach ORD safely...if not, I owe you dinner.

Or, if you are still apprehensive, try CO (SNA-IAH-ORD) on their 737NGs (I think their oldest one is 10 years old)



"On spaceship earth there are no passengers...only crew."
User currently offlineLAXtoATL From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 1590 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 20223 times:



Quoting Longhornmaniac (Reply 5):
The maintenance process is a very complicated, but unbelievably thorough. The C-check, which occurs at a regular interval (not sure, maybe once every 6 months?), essentially takes the entire plane apart, looking for any flaws, then puts it back together from the ground up

I think you are actually referring to the D-check or HMV check (also known as Heavy Maintenance Visit). This is when the airplane is completed taken apart, inspected inch by inch, and rebuilt from the ground up. It definitely doesn't occur every 6 months, I think it is more like every 5-6 years. Maybe somebody with more technical knowledge can confirm?

However, the bottom line for the OP is that the age of an aircraft is more or less irrelevant to safety of the airplane because all commercial airliners are rebuilt every several years. I believe that I was advised once that an airframe can last pretty much indefintely as long as it is maintained properly. The reason aircraft are sent to collect dust in the desert is not because they can't be flown safely, but because it costs to much to maintain and operate them - i.e. cheaper and more efficient to just buy a new bird. In fact, it is usually when an aircraft is due for a HMV that the decision is made to retire it and it is not a coincidence.


User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16689 posts, RR: 51
Reply 14, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 20148 times:

Honestly do yourself a favor and take Amtrak, the issue is not the age of the plane. The issue is your fear of flying, asking us in the forum about specifics vis a vis maintenance etc. is not going to make you feel better.

Get yourself a bedroom in one of Amtrak's sleeping cars and watch the world go by.

http://www.amtrak.com/servlet/Conten...oute_C/1241245650447/1237405732511



Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlineFX772LRF From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 675 posts, RR: 12
Reply 15, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 20118 times:

If an old plane wasn't safe, how did it become old?

Also, the two people sitting up front making sure the plane gets you where you want to go safely, are also hoping they get themselves there safely too.

-Noah  wave 



Cleared to IAH via CLL 076 radial/BAZBL/RIICE3, up to 3k, 7k in 10, departure on 134.3, squawk 4676, Colgan 9581.
User currently offline777STL From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 3362 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 20059 times:



Quoting KL911 (Reply 17):
Pff, anything over the age of 20 years old I refuse to fly. Luckily we dont have them in Europe, but the US has a bad name here for keeping planes for to long.

And yet that's completely irrational. There's nothing wrong with a 20 year old aircraft and keeping aircraft that long isn't exclusive to US airlines. I can also think of some very well known, prestigious European airlines that have aircraft that are 20+ years old. BA, LH, KL, etc.



PHX based
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5637 posts, RR: 11
Reply 17, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 20030 times:



Quoting KL911 (Reply 17):
but the US has a bad name here for keeping planes for to long.

Yet, ironically, we have a better safety record than certain Eastern European carriers with 'new' fleets...... funny, that.

GUMAH (aka big sissy in SoCal): I am a mechanic for an airline that flies both new and old Boeings; if you have SPECIFIC question, I love nothing more than to talk about what I do- send me a PM, and when I get home from work tonight, I'll answer it.

Quoting Wjcandee (Reply 10):
Now, of course, the bad fashions and weak music of the 80s are ancient history

Respect your roots, boy. Do not EVER diss 80's music... the world will never be the same! Erh, uh, I mean, it's been improved, I mean, it's a better place, I mean... dang it, 80's MUSIC ROCKS!


User currently offlineCanadianNorth From Canada, joined Aug 2002, 3387 posts, RR: 9
Reply 18, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 20012 times:



Quoting LAXtoATL (Reply 13):
It definitely doesn't occur every 6 months, I think it is more like every 5-6 years.

Daily Inspection is done for every 24-hour flying period. Basically you check the logbook for defects, make sure the lights all work, check the tire pressures, stick yer flashlight in the engine intakes and exhaust ducts, and a few other bits and pieces and then do a general walkaround to make sure there isn't a gaping hole in the side or a wing falling off or something. Generally one person can do it in an hour or two.

A checks are done in sections (A1, A2, A3, etc) and one will come up every couple of weeks. These are basically just a more in-depth version of a daily inspection, and some minor maintenance such as changing filters, greasing the flaps and landing gear, and so on. These usually takes 2 or 3 people an afternoon to complete.

C checks are also done in stages (C1, C2, C3 etc) and depending on how much flying you do one will come up about once every year or two. These are the ones where large parts of the aircraft are actually taken apart and inspected. These are done with a team of mechanics working on it for several days.

D check comes up every several years, and you can pretty much think of that as take the whole plane apart and rebuild it...



CanadianNorth



What could possibly go wrong?
User currently offlineArcrftLvr From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 819 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 19982 times:



Quoting KL911 (Reply 17):
Pff, anything over the age of 20 years old I refuse to fly. Luckily we dont have them in Europe, but the US has a bad name here for keeping planes for to long.

Number 1, you're post is totally insensitive to the OPs, so why even make that sort of statement?

Number 2, your fear is totally irrational and your suggestion that the US has a reputation for keeping planes too long is unfounded and asinine. The US has a remarkable safety record and even with that, I am not aware of any crashes involving a US plane has been specifically linked to the age of the airframe. In addition, 20 years is an arbitrary number that has no meaning given the amount of maintenance that goes into every aircraft.

In the future, if you don't have anything of value to add to the discussion, please keep your comments to yourself.


User currently offlineMd80fanatic From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2659 posts, RR: 10
Reply 20, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 19931 times:

It is too bad that you cannot be allowed into the cockpit, in flight especially (like it used to be when flying was cool). That one experience would change your apprehensive-ness to something wonderful.  Smile

Have a good flight, and I hope your return trip is one of wonder, instead of fear. It can happen.  Smile


User currently offlineFcK77 From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 11 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 19831 times:

Hello Gumah,

To start my long threat let me just tell you one thing: Your flight will be incredible safe... safer than anything else you did that same day!

I myself am quite nervous when flying. Actually, joining airliners.net has really helped me understanding what goes on when operating commercial aircraft's. With loosing my ignorance about the fact behind flying and about the incredible job all mechanics, flight attendants (who's primary task is your safety and not to serve you... so listen to them!) and pilots do every day I almost completely lost my fear. I actually find myself enjoying some of my approx. 130 flights per year.

To tell you the truth, there is not one commercial airline in the United States that I would not fly with (and I am one of those snobby European's!). Not only are maintenance procedures better than in most other countries of the world, but the people operating these metal tubes are just amazing!

Now to your specific flight; the 757 from United.... Even at the time I was in a state of panic 2 days prior to every flight (and that means in my job being in a state of panic pretty much all the time), I would at any point have flown in a 757 from United. The 757 is not only an incredible safe aircraft, but it is one of the most comfortable planes to fly on. I can not give you any facts about what technical stuff that makes the 757 such an outstanding plane, but from a fear of flying perspective it is one of the easiest rides you will ever have.

Here are some tips which make your experience easier:
1) Select a seat as much in the front as possible; for some reason it does not shake that much if you are in the front section or above the wing
2) When you board the plane let the flight attendant know that you are afraid; flight attendants are the most incredible people and they will take care of you. Let them know and be nice to them! I always pack a chocolate bar which I give to the flight attendants after my flight to thank them for helping me over my fear (and yes, I buy a lot of chocolate in a year)
3) When you get offered to look into the cockpit prior to the flight have no shame... go in! And ask as many questions you have... even if you feel stupid! Pilots are proud of their job and love to share their experiences with you.
4) During the flight: Tell the flight attendant if you feel uncertain; they will tell you what is going on and they will go all the way to help you!
5) Appreciate the great job everyone will do to keep you safe and comfortable

To close this long statement: THANKS FOR ALL YOU PILOTS, FLIGHT ATTENDANTS, MAINTENANCE CREWS for being just incredible and for taking my fear!

Enjoy your ride!!!!


User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22299 posts, RR: 20
Reply 22, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 19964 times:



Quoting ArcrftLvr (Reply 23):
The US has a remarkable safety record and even with that, I am not aware of any crashes involving a US plane has been specifically linked to the age of the airframe.

Actually, let's take up the substance of his point. When was the last time a twenty plus year old passenger airframe crashed in the United States?

Going back twenty years, I found three: the Chalks crash in Miami a few years ago (and that was a nearly SIXTY year old airplane), a CO wheels-up landing in IAH in 1997 that had nothing to do with the age of the aircraft, and a Tower Air accident at JFK.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineJohnClipper From Hong Kong, joined Aug 2005, 826 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 20431 times:

If your concern is with UA, you should be at ease. These aircraft are well maintained. If your concern is with the UA 757, just remember that these aircraft were delivered around the same time as the AA 757s and, in some cases, the CO 757s, both of which are still flying just fine.

User currently offlineArcrftLvr From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 819 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (4 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 20357 times:



Quoting Cubsrule (Reply 26):
Going back twenty years, I found three: the Chalks crash in Miami a few years ago (and that was a nearly SIXTY year old airplane), a CO wheels-up landing in IAH in 1997 that had nothing to do with the age of the aircraft, and a Tower Air accident at JFK.

I'm not sure I understand what you are getting at. Are you saying these are linked to the age of the airframe? Sounds like the CO crash didn't. Please clarify your point.


25 Lexy : I'd really hate it for you if you were flying on one of DL's DC-9's! LOL!!! You'd be crapping yourself by now. Of course I am just picking on you so d
26 Cubsrule : CO was pilot error period. The other two were probably a combination of age and poor m/x, though those are the exception, not the rule. He's probably
27 ArcrftLvr : If you're point is that there have only been three occurances of a 20 year old plus passenger airframe crashing, then I think you may have missed a c
28 ArcrftLvr : I would venture to say the crashes were attributed to poor m/x. As said above, a properly maintained aircraft can fly for 40 years without a problem.
29 Cubsrule : A 2 month old airplane isn't going to have a wing fall off - we have to grant that.
30 Lexy : You sir are exactly right. That DC-9 was the smoothest and most comfortable flight I have had yet!! And I have flown aircraft that are brand new all
31 M11Stephen : I feel a lot safer in a UA757 than I do in a brand new Volvo XC60 (The safest car ever produced.) Most accidents aircraft accidents aren't caused by o
32 OA412 : Ridiculous comments. First, as others have mentioned there are several European airlines currently flying 20+ year old aircraft and there is absolute
33 Mir : Well. You've got nothing to worry about from a safety standpoint. You'll experience the SNA departure, and that can be a bit disconcerting if you hav
34 Etoile : You can take comfort in the fact that you are far more likely to die driving to the airport than flying commercially in the U.S. So don't worry about
35 ULMFlyer : Considering your username, it's pretty ironic that KLM has a number of 733s and 4 744s that are over 20 years old.
36 SurfandSnow : Good thing you aren't flying through MSP or DTW! Then you would encounter some REALLY old planes!
37 FX1816 : Agreed, and no one except one person noted that the UA 752's are actually fairly new considering that UA jumped into the 757 game late taking deliver
38 Cubsrule : For anything designed in the past thirty years, I'd say yes. It's true that older planes are more demanding m/x-wise, but that in no way makes them l
39 Bogota : I can say that it does amaze me personally that some American airlines are flying quite old aircraft, i.e. NW-DL DC-9s, I remember as a kind going to
40 413x3 : in America we have so many different airlines all going after a small segment of the population, the high costs of new replacement aircraft are too mu
41 Stratosphere : Yeah well I know the DC-9 intimately but I do question the current maintenance for obvious reasons. This is a true statement...I have worked on aircr
42 Western727 : My mother, bless her heart, hates to fly though. Her remedy? A couple of drinks. I recognize it may not work for everyone, though.
43 SEPilot : But they don't crash. We haven't had a large airliner (i.e. Boeing or Airbus) crash since 2001, which is better than Europe can claim. There was the
44 Tommy767 : UA 757s are very well maintained. Even on the inside, I find that UA takes better care of their 757s than say AA. UA installed new side lighting and k
45 Oobitsa : My friend, the most dangerous part of your trip will be your rides to and from the airport, followed next by any sort of escalator ride you might have
46 ThirtyEcho : Truer words were never spoken. Flightopobia is an irrational and deeply psychological affliction that is not amenable to reason and is unaffected by
47 United1 : UAs maintenance is first rate, and always has been, they operate 96 757-200s that are anywhere from 10-20 years old. Don't worry and enjoy your fligh
48 ThirtyEcho : Save your breath, you can't help a flightophobe by reciting facts. They have projected all of their human fears onto airplanes and think that they ar
49 Goldenshield : Some are still waiting on that bridge to Hawaii.
50 Sandyb123 : You'll be grand on UAs 757s Gumah! Absolutely, ask to see in the cockpit before or after the flight. Md80fanatic you might be surprised at how often y
51 Aogdesk : Just to add to the affirmative comments about the overall safety of flight (and the ultra-cool B757), I suggest that you seek out the flight crew befo
52 YOWza : The planes are very well maintained so you should not worry. It might help to listen to Channel 9 the whole time. The calmness and professionalism of
53 FLY2HMO : May I ask what else you have done to correct your phobia? You have been flying somewhat from what it sounds like, yet you appear to still suffer from
54 MasseyBrown : I had a friend who was afraid to fly. Another friend took him to one of those rooftop hotel bars with a view of the Los Angeles airport. They watched
55 Gumah : That's quite original, never thought of it that way. The more I fly, the better it gets. Unfortunately, it's been 2 1/2 years, so the b.s. thoughts c
56 FLY2HMO : Hence why I suggested you do this: Small planes are much more subject to turbulence. And by taking an aerobatic flight you can see how far a plane ca
57 Cchan : No worries mate, hope you enjoy your trip. Well, when the sh!t comes, you may hear fellow passengers scream, or some even vomit. But all of them even
58 Jayeshrulz : well u may never know, your plane may be the 8 yr old...well they are very new and well maintained. dont worry they are very safe.
59 Lexy : HAHA! I'm glad I read that now and not on say......August 30th right before I flew on two of them going to and from ORD from BNA. LOL!!! I rode a DC-
60 Qantas777 : Not sure if this was mentioned to you: take off from SNA will be different than many airports. Airplane will rev engines and you will not move for a b
61 777jaah : It makes me remember RG's ex-777. I think those were definetively newer than many 757s around, and it was cheaper to scrap than having them go throug
62 ACElite : If it wasn't safe, any reputable airline would not fly it! Not to mention, the pilots don't really want to lose their lives, so, I'm sure they likely
63 Brilondon : The interiors are of course subject to the specific airline but there are no safer forms of transportation in the world, and you are going to be flyi
64 Lincoln : Anytime I have those kind of thoughts run through my head (what can I say, I'm a little pessimistic) or I have a nervous passenger next to me the thin
65 UALWN : I myself find listening to Channel 9 very soothing when we hit moderate or worse turbulence and the cold sweating starts... Weak music of the 80s?? W
66 ArcrftLvr : Out of curiosity, which hotels have this? I thought the only places where you can watch planes and have a drink are at The Proud Bird and Encounter.
67 Silver1SWA : Actually, quite the opposite. You used to be able to sign up for free. Gumah signed up before the site started charging. Gumah, I think the point has
68 Cchan : Not all pilots though. In most parts of the developed world, the pilots value their lives as much as yours, but in parts of Africa, especially for ca
69 413X3 : My guess is The Standard in Inglewood
70 MasseyBrown : I have no idea. Given where they live and work, I'd guess the Century City or Marina areas.
71 Deltajets : I would rather fly on a 757 thats even over 20 years old rather than a airplane that has composite as a stabilizer, wing or fuselage.
72 FX1816 : Actually what about the CO 735 that went off the runway in DEN in December I believe??? Or how about the USAirways A320 in the Hudson, yes that wasn'
73 ArcrftLvr : Where's that? The Standard, I mean. Not Inglewood. I thought there were only two of those in LA. One in downtown and one in West Hollywood.... Centur
74 Tharanga : Well, Gumah is saying that reading this thread is helpful, so we should continue. Gumah, I applaud you for realising that your fear is irrational, an
75 Rafaelyyz : I get the impression that most people are confusing safety and risk. Is it safe to fly? Yes. Is it riskier than driving? In my opinion, certainly yes.
76 WROORD : Just thinkt...planes are made to fly, so put on your headset find smooth jazz music channel and let them fly.....
77 LiquidAquifer : I love flying. I've flown commercially, countless times, all over the U.S. and throughout much of the world. I've flown on all kinds of aircraft, ope
78 666Wizard : Gumah, yes, there have been a few occasions when airliners have crashed in the last few years. But I, for one, cannot think of an occasion when it wa
79 MCOflyer : Gumah, I have flown in 20+yr 757's and loved it. UA has a good safety record and like everyone on this board has mentioned, their aircraft are well ma
80 Rafaelyyz : Probably the single most abused statistic on the planet. But people (and the industry) latch on to it because it makes them feel warm inside. Flying
81 Brilondon : I guess you don't fly any more, there are very few planes flying now save NW's DC-9's, that don't have some composite parts. These composite material
82 Jetfuel : The 757 has probably the best dafety rating of any jetliner. FULLSTOP. Looking at the causes of any 757 accidents/incidents the a/c has the least cont
83 HAWK21M : Maintenance & quality of flying determine safety NOT age. regds MEL.
84 UALWN : It's exactly the routine transmissions that calm me down when I'm getting nervous because of turbulence. "Ahh, we are getting some light to moderate
85 WESTERN737800 : I wouldn't think twice about getting on any U.S. airline operated 757. I've flown on airplanes much older than the 757 without even thinking about it.
86 Rcair1 : If my recollection serves - it may help to define "quick". Been a while since I departed SNA, but my recollection is steep pitch on takeoff and fast
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