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Can An Airline Employee Also Work For An FBO?  
User currently offlineSwa4life From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 385 posts, RR: 1
Posted (4 years 8 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4969 times:

I know about the policy most airlines have regarding working for another airline while employed with said airline. I know that they make you resign from any previous airline job before being hired.. But,.. what about FBOs? Can I work for an airline and and FBO at the same airport?

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4966 times:



Quoting Swa4life (Thread starter):
But,.. what about FBOs? Can I work for an airline and and FBO at the same airport?

I don't see why you couldn't. As much as they like to blame GA for their current situation, airlines don't compete with FBOs.


User currently offlineDLX737200 From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1901 posts, RR: 20
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4953 times:

I had a buddy try to work for Comair and an FBO in MCO at the same time and Comair said either quit the FBO or no working for Comair. That FBO also had the fuel contract for mainline DL at the time.

User currently offlineSwa4life From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 385 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 4950 times:

Yes,... that's a variable that I assumed would come into play as well..

I'm talking about an FBO that has no service contracts with any other competing carriers.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6481 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 4864 times:

Isn't there a problem with rest ?

If we're talking about a flying job, I thought there were regulations, to be sure that the crew members were not too tired. So, if you have another job, I see a problem.

If it's a ground job, I still would like an answer for my education (here in France working several jobs is not very frequent, whatever the jobs).



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineIflyswa From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 154 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 4841 times:

I've done this working at DAL without issues. I was completely forthcoming with both Employers and didn't encounter any pushback from either one.

I suppose it might have helped that some of the Corporate Officers for my airline Employer used the FBO facilities at which I was also employed part-time on some occasions for which they needed to travel discreetly, were headed to a large family gathering (with all the family in tow), or to conduct business in some city my airline Employer doesn't itself serve. Additionally, on the somewhat rare occurrence we'd have a private A318 or a BBJ parked on the ramp, my airline Employer would loan the FBO belt loaders, airstairs, and various other GSE pieces our operation didn't normally call for since G5's or Globals were typically the largest transients we'd have on the ramp.

I don't believe that either one sees the other as a competitive threat, but particularly for the Corporate Culture in place at my airline. In fact, I was impressed to find that there was even basic cooperation between the two--as in the example of sharing certain pieces of GSE above. But I think my airline was interested in learning more about an FBO's niche, in general, since I was asked by some of our Talent Development folks if I could help coordinate with the Management at the FBO to bring a group over for a look around and to answer some questions they hoped could help them prepare a presentation. In reciprocation, a few of the Managers at the FBO were able to sit in on a Customer Service class my airline offers to Employees as Customer Service was a major tenet common to both businesses and probably the best aspect of our operation for which my airline is known.

All in all, it was really great for me learn about and have experiences in these two distinct areas of general aviation, both to draw parallels and to find the clear disconnects, but my passion is in really in the commercial arena. I wound up quitting my job at the FBO to devote time to go back to school, but I was really grateful that neither company found it a conflict of interest that I spent my time working between the two.

iflyswa

Edited: Spelling

[Edited 2009-11-14 01:40:38 by iflyswa]


Opinions expressed by "iflyswa" are not those of Southwest Airlines Officers, Directors, or Employees.
User currently offlineAirman99o From Canada, joined Aug 1999, 975 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4740 times:

here at Sky, There are a few selected flight attendants that are working both with the airline and the FBO.


Safety is Everyones Responsibility.
User currently offlineAirTran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3702 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4656 times:
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When I was at FL and de-iced for ASIG I had to get it cleared with Human Resources. The main issue was that I was technically helping a competitor. They didn't put up a big stink about it, and I was cleared to do so in about a week. If you are planning on doing it, I recommend you read your employee handbook/contract and ensure you aren't violating a no compete clause.


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User currently offlineDalmd88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2532 posts, RR: 14
Reply 8, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4644 times:

Through the years I've known a lot of mechanics that work for an airline and do side work for a local FBO. At one small turboprop airline we had one old guy that they hired from the FBO. It was a term of employment that he would only join us if he could stay on at the FBO. At DL the guys always tend to keep it quite. I knew a couple in ATL that were running over to ABX in the morning when ever ABX had to do a 767 'A' Check. We had an inspector in BOS that started a on call van service while he was still at DL. He later took an early retirement package to do it full time. I think management knew about it but didn't care because he only did bizjet work.

User currently offlineMayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10334 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4612 times:

I think at DL it would only come into play if it was a conflict of interest or it was negatively affecting your work at DL.


"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineLONGisland89 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 723 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4550 times:

I know several mechanics that work for a large U.S. carrier that also work for a local FBO.

User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2817 posts, RR: 45
Reply 11, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4531 times:

At our airline you have to clear secondary employment within the aviation industry with the company (there is a quick process that supervisors can direct employees through). As long as the company doesn't perceive a direct competition or find your secondary employment to be degrading your work at the airline, it's not a problem. I would be completely honest and approach your supervisor explaining what you want to do. There will possibly be some contact with HR, but it's best to be aboveboard about it from the beginning.

User currently offlineBartonsayswhat From Canada, joined Oct 2007, 434 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4226 times:

My company guidelines are, "Ramp is not conflict of interest as it does not directly reflect sales."

User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5556 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 4172 times:



Quoting DLX737200 (Reply 2):
That FBO also had the fuel contract for mainline DL at the time.

That's the reason why. Conflict of interest.

Quoting Swa4life (Reply 3):

I'm talking about an FBO that has no service contracts with any other competing carriers.

Should be ok. Of course, it would be best to check with your employer first. This is not one of those things where it's better to beg forgiveness than ask permission.



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlinePhelpsie87 From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 498 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 3950 times:

When I used to work for OO, I had a coworker split his time between us and the FBO on the field. He worked as a fueler, so most days, we would say goodbye to him from OO only to reunite an hour or so later as he fueled our RJ's. No issues ever came up, even though he also fueled NW/DL, G4, F9, and all the other operators on the field. I honestly do not see a big deal, but I guess it could be if the FBO has ground handling as well, such as GFK Flight Support does for G4.

Like others have said, be up front. I do think they would be willing to work with you on it as long as one job does not negatively influence the other. If they say no, pick the job that you have the best pay, hours, benefits, etc. Look out for #1!! Big grin


User currently offlineAfrikaskyes From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 141 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3429 times:

I knew a few airline employees who worked for the airport FBO and even serviced their own airlines aircraft and no one really had a problem with it. I suppose it depends on the individual FBO's hiring policy.

I also knew of 5 TSA employees who worked for a few airlines while still working for the TSA. Scheduling was a nightmare but somehow it worked out for them. Was that a conflict of interest? ABSOLUTELY!! I can't tell you how many times I saw one of them either save their own airline some how some way by breaking TSA policies. I can't believe the TSA allowed that kind of moonlighting, but apparently it wasn't a problem. Though, as of a few months ago, I heard DL suggested they would no longer be accepting applications from current TSA employees at that airport. What a joke.


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