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Dimming Lights For Takeoff & Landing  
User currently onlineSRforever From Switzerland, joined Dec 2006, 129 posts, RR: 2
Posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11225 times:

Howzit

When taking off or landing at night time, the crew normally announces that the cabin lights must be dimmed due to international regulations.
Now I'm wondering is there really such a regulation or is it just company policy? On a recent EK flight the lights on the left side of the aircraft could not be turned off for the entire flight due to a technical fault. So was this a breach of regulations and a safety concern or isn't it really a problem.

thanks for your help

38 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJetfuel From Australia, joined Jan 2005, 2215 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11228 times:

its to adjust your eyes in case of an emergency


Where's the passion gone out of the airline industry? The smell of jetfuel and the romance of taking a flight....
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7694 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11216 times:
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Quoting Jetfuel (Reply 1):
its to adjust your eyes in case of an emergency

That was not the question. The issue is whether or not it is a requirement, and whether the flight he took where the lights could not be dimmed constituted a breach of the rules.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineJetfuel From Australia, joined Jan 2005, 2215 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11183 times:



Quoting RussianJet (Reply 2):
Quoting Jetfuel (Reply 1):
its to adjust your eyes in case of an emergency

That was not the question. The issue is whether or not it is a requirement, and whether the flight he took where the lights could not be dimmed constituted a breach of the rules.

I am not aware of it being a CASA reg, but dont know every country



Where's the passion gone out of the airline industry? The smell of jetfuel and the romance of taking a flight....
User currently offlineJayeshrulz From India, joined Apr 2007, 1027 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11185 times:

this same thing happened to my CX flight...coincidentally to DXB...they dimmed the lights only during takeoff but...or i mustn't have noticed.
I really wonder why?



Keep flying, because the sky is no limit!
User currently offlineDitzyboy From Australia, joined Feb 2008, 717 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11185 times:

I do not believe it is a requirement - just an airline policy.

My airline dimmed the lights completely for night take off and landing when I started nine years ago. They said this was to increase 'night vision' of the occupants in the event of an accident.

Then we went to FULL bright for take off and landing, day or night. They said this was to increase the visibility of the aircraft to other aircraft. If ever you see aircraft taxi, take off or land at night, you will notice the ones with the cabins lights turned up a lot better.

Then four years ago we went to LO setting for take off and landing - to increase customer comfort.

I think airlines vary their policies to keep staff on their toes and the customers confused! Go figure...


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7694 posts, RR: 21
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11180 times:
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I wish they would keep the lights dimmed when taking very early morning flights. I hate it when the lights go down, I start getting snoozy then once we're in the climb the lights are suddenly thrown back on full blast. Grrrr.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently onlineSRforever From Switzerland, joined Dec 2006, 129 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 11148 times:



Quoting Ditzyboy (Reply 5):
I do not believe it is a requirement - just an airline policy.



Quoting Ditzyboy (Reply 5):
think airlines vary their policies to keep staff on their toes and the customers confused! Go figure...

From the sound of it I believe you might be right.


User currently offlineUAEflyer From United Arab Emirates, joined Nov 2006, 1061 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 11041 times:

I don't think it is requirement but airline policy, i remember once i was coming from BOM to DXB on Air India Jumbo, the lights was on during the entire flight, it was a night flight

User currently offlineDangould2000 From UK - Scotland, joined Dec 2005, 172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 10884 times:

It is an IAA and CAA regulation to dim the cabin lights when flying in the hours of darkness


Next Flights:- wherever the airline sends me
User currently offlineLexy From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 2515 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 10716 times:

I have never heard the cabin crew, or flightdeck officers, announce to us in the cabin that they are dimming the lights because of anything. Everytime I have flown at night, they just automatically dim them at takeoff and landing. I've never considered a big deal, but this is interesting.....


Nashville, Tennessee KBNA
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25045 posts, RR: 46
Reply 11, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 10596 times:

A quick search would reveal several threads with the same discussion and answers already.

Why Dim Cabins On Take-off And Landing? (by Qantasistheway Jan 5 2009 in Civil Aviation)
Why Do Many Airlines Dim The Lights.... (by EHCPH Jul 30 2008 in Civil Aviation)
Dimming Lights During A Night Landing (by VHOJF May 26 2007 in Civil Aviation)
Dimming Cabin Lights On Take Off (by A380Heavy Jun 20 2006 in Civil Aviation)



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineAmricanShamrok From Ireland, joined May 2008, 2884 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 10527 times:

I've been on a good few Aer Lingus transatlantic flights where on takeoff and landing in Ireland, the lights are left the same (on) but always when taking off and landing in Chicago the lights are turned fully off. Maybe each country is different?


Shannon-Chicago
User currently offlineGrimey From Ireland, joined Jun 2005, 451 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 10441 times:

I was told before it is because the pax can see if there is any fire coming from the engines since they are the only ones inside the aircraft that would have a good view, try looking out at the engines at night time while the lights are on inside and you will find it hard to see them due to the difference in light on the eye.

Quoting UAEflyer (Reply 8):
I don't think it is requirement but airline policy, i remember once i was coming from BOM to DXB on Air India Jumbo, the lights was on during the entire flight, it was a night flight

I was on DXB - DUB with EI 2 years ago and they never dimmed or turned off the cabin lights, very hard to get sleep on that flight. On another note I was on AF B747-400 HAV - CDG a few years ago and they dimmed the lights a good bit inside the cabin during the night flight so over the Atlantic I looked out my window and all I could see was stars in the sky, pretty cool sight.

Grimey


User currently offlineSkyguy From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 481 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 10165 times:

Apart from dimming lights on take-off and/or landing, some airlines (e.g. AA) sometimes play music when they are taxiing to the gate or in some instances when boarding. I've never understood what the purpose of playing music only when taxiing to or boarding at the gate.


"Those who talk, do not know, and those who know, do not talk."
User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 10021 times:

Its so your eyes will be adjusted for darkness in the event of a power loss or smoke evacuation and so the F/As can more easily see outside the aircraft to better be able to direct an evacuation. Its an airline policy and I don't believe its an FAA regulation.


My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineBri2k1 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 988 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 9908 times:



Quoting Grimey (Reply 13):
I was told before it is because the pax can see if there is any fire coming from the engines

This one cracks me up. What would you do if there was?



Position and hold
User currently offlineM11Stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 9845 times:



Quoting Bri2k1 (Reply 16):
Quoting Grimey (Reply 13):
I was told before it is because the pax can see if there is any fire coming from the engines

This one cracks me up. What would you do if there was?

Its more for the F/As so they can see if there is fire outside the aircraft and direct passengers accordingly.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25098 posts, RR: 22
Reply 18, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 9626 times:



Quoting Bri2k1 (Reply 16):
Quoting Grimey (Reply 13):
I was told before it is because the pax can see if there is any fire coming from the engines

This one cracks me up. What would you do if there was?

The fire will often be on one side only, so you would not open the emergency exits on the side with the fire and you would only exit from the other side. On airlines in Europe, if you're sitting in an emergency exit row, when flight attendants brief you before takeoff on how to open the exit they often tell you not to open the exit if you see fire outside..


User currently offlineTommy767 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 6584 posts, RR: 9
Reply 19, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 9602 times:

I know many airlines dim takeoff lights before takeoff at night, but onetime when we took off out of ORD going to LAX on AA in a snowstorm i'm pretty sure the cabin lights were left on. Was this because we were taking off in rough weather?


"Folks that's the news and I'm outta here!" -- Dennis Miller
User currently offlineKingFriday013 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 1296 posts, RR: 9
Reply 20, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 9162 times:

I noticed on US Airways Express (Air Wisconsin and Piedmont Airlines, at least) that the flight attendant announces that the main cabin lights will be dimmed, but rather than giving a reason, the f/a just says that passengers can use the personal reading lights located on the passenger service units located above their heads if they would like to have a light for personal use. I don't recall the last time I flew when they actually gave us a reason for it.

-J.



Tho' I've belted you an' flayed you, By the livin' Gawd that made you, You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!
User currently offlineStrandedInBGM From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 349 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 8702 times:



Quoting Dangould2000 (Reply 9):
It is an IAA and CAA regulation to dim the cabin lights when flying in the hours of darkness

And you can prove this statement how?



It's 737s, 747s and 380s. Not 737's, 747's and 380's. Learn to use the apostrophe for crying out loud.
User currently offlineUnited1P From United States of America, joined Aug 2009, 112 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 8457 times:



Quoting KingFriday013 (Reply 20):

Yea, I have never heard a reason from any FA on any airline... but I don't think it bothers most people, which is why a reason isn't really needed (just guessing)



"You've never been lost until you've been lost at Mach 3." -Paul F. Crickmore
User currently offlineNwafan20 From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 157 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 8384 times:

It was a pretty regular occurrence on my Northwest DC-9 flights for the lights to be dimmed even in the daylight and they just left them dim the entire flight. Does anybody know the reason for this? I can only think of one of my DC-9 flights where they didn't dim the lights. This only happened on the DC-9 for me, the rest of my flights were normal.


Long live the Red Tail! | WMU Flight Science major
User currently offlineBrilondon From Canada, joined exactly 9 years ago today! , 4187 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (4 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 8095 times:



Quoting LAXintl (Reply 11):
A quick search would reveal several threads with the same discussion and answers already.

Why Dim Cabins On Take-off And Landing? (by Qantasistheway Jan 5 2009 in Civil Aviation)
Why Do Many Airlines Dim The Lights.... (by EHCPH Jul 30 2008 in Civil Aviation)
Dimming Lights During A Night Landing (by VHOJF May 26 2007 in Civil Aviation)
Dimming Cabin Lights On Take Off (by A380Heavy Jun 20 2006 in Civil Aviation)

Well Mr. Know It All, he probably did a search but as usually happens I am not satisfied with the answers given and would like the question I have answered and I am sure he is in the same boat.

Now on to the topic at hand. I have been told that it is to keep your orientation in case of an emergency evacuation. That is from an AA FA a few years ago which made sense to me.



Rush for ever; Yankees all the way!!
25 Post contains images JFKPurser : In the US there is no FAA rule requiring lights to be either dim or bright at any phase of the flight -- except during the emergency demo if it is bei
26 ThirtyEcho : Dim the cabin lights? Hell, in the DC-3 days, they would turn the cabin lights completely off before a night takeoff or landing. The only light came f
27 RussianJet : Strange question. The answer is run up and down the aisle screaming, naturally.
28 ASAFA : I absolutely hate the cabin lights on during the flight. Maybe it is acceptable on an international flight during meal service but otherwise leave the
29 Calibansa333 : On both Finnair flights I have been on, they only played it during landing and taxi into the gate.
30 LMML 14/32 : It is NOT a laid down regulation. But it is always wise to dim the lights to, as has been said above, adjust one's eyes to darkness should an emergenc
31 Grimey : Thats what I always wondered, first to see the engine on fire is the first one to get in the brace position and kiss their ass goodbye. Grimey
32 Bri2k1 : Not if the seat belt sign is still illuminated. RETURN TO SEAT - GOBACKEN SIDONNA
33 RussianJet : No chance. Blind panic is the only way forward! Only jesting of course, I would in fact just try and keep calm and put my faith in the crew dealing w
34 Tonystan : It really does make me laugh when people suggest that airlines make up rules just to annoy the passengers!!!!! I reckon passengers just make up compla
35 Indy : So you dim the lights as to prevent night blindness or whatever you want to call it? So what happens if the cabin is dark and your eyes have adjusted
36 LMML 14/32 : Indy, that's where you are wrong. If there is a fire it is most likely to be OUTSIDE. And pax will evacuate on the other side of the plane where it is
37 Huaiwei : When I fly into or out of SIN or HKG at night, the SQ or CX pilot often turn off the lights, informing passengers that he is doing so for the passenge
38 Tonystan : You alwayss this condiscending? LOL! Simple...when have you ever been "Blinded" by looking at a fire??? Fire does not emit light at glaring levels. C
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