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Amazing Video. The A300 Was/is A Real Tank!  
User currently offlineEA772LR From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2836 posts, RR: 10
Posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 15951 times:

I found this video and was pretty blown away by the story. This was the DHL A300-B4 (I believe) that suffered a missile strike on it's left wing. The crew managed to land it safely. Amazing IMHO, and a testament to the durability of the A300-B4.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCGdVjZlk2Y&feature=related


We often judge others by their actions, but ourselves by our intentions.
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline757GB From Uruguay, joined Feb 2009, 676 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 15711 times:

I think the most amazing part of it all is that as I recall the aircraft lost all hydraulics.
It was in a way similar to UA232 in that respect, except that in this case they were able to land with no casualties.



God is The Alpha and The Omega. We come from God. We go towards God. What an Amazing Journey...
User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5598 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 15592 times:



Quoting 757GB (Reply 1):
except that in this case they were able to land with no casualties.

The crew specifically mentioned UA232 when asked about how they did it.



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlineYak42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days ago) and read 14977 times:

Yes I think it is a very sturdy and safe aircraft. In Iran, a very crash prone country with lax regulation enforcemant and bad corruption in its airline industry, the most common type there, the A300 has been the workhorse of domestic and international flights since 1980 without a major incident attributed to the aircraft or its maintenance. They have crashed almost all other types to fly there more than once. I dont think they are a very easy aircraft to crash.

User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26938 posts, RR: 58
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days ago) and read 14915 times:

A300-B4 was a fantastic aircraft. It was the work horse of many a European carrier. I flew on Olympics all the time in the 80's-90's. Shame they are gone from EU passenger flights now.


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User currently offlineEmirates2005 From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 238 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 13777 times:

I have seen this video a while back, however it still amazes me every time I see it. The A300 was probably the most underestimated of all Airbus aircraft, yet it served so well. Although I never had the chance of flying on one, I could only settle for her younger sister the A310 with Czech Airlines.


A310, A332, B732, B738, B742, B743, B773, B77W, DC-10, ATR42, TU-134, TU-154, IL-62, MI-8, E190, A320, C172
User currently offlineYodobashi From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2007, 236 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 13602 times:

And this is how she looked when I flew on her back in 1991 ....


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Photo © Alastair T. Gardiner - WorldAirImages




"The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page"
User currently offlineTheRedBaron From Mexico, joined Mar 2005, 2211 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 12861 times:

I Flew on PanAm´s A300 twice and to San Juan Puerto Rico on AA A300´s back in the 80´s. I remember vividly how ¨high¨ the wing looked, since I often flew on Dc-9 and 727´s.

A wonderful plane that took off like a rocket and was very smooth and silent...

Sadly it was underated in north America, so It was rare to see them and fly in them.

happy holidays TRB



The best seat in a Plane is the Jumpseat.
User currently offlineCainanuk From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2002, 551 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 12298 times:

A300 still flies for Monarch in a pax config.


Cainan Cornelius
User currently offlineTeme82 From Finland, joined Mar 2007, 1508 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9506 times:
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Quoting Cainanuk (Reply 8):
A300 still flies for Monarch in a pax config.

On what routes?



Flying high and low
User currently offlineLHRSpotter From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2006, 182 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9347 times:



Quoting Teme82 (Reply 9):
A300 still flies for Monarch in a pax config.

On what routes?

UK to the Carribean, Canaries, Egypt and Greece?

On a side note I find it quite interesting that it was an A300 which was involved in that horrific crash in Queens in November 2001 (AA587) where the entire vertical stabiliser snapped off at relatively low speed.


User currently offlineKaitak From Ireland, joined Aug 1999, 12432 posts, RR: 37
Reply 11, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 8413 times:



Quoting LHRSpotter (Reply 10):
On a side note I find it quite interesting that it was an A300 which was involved in that horrific crash in Queens in November 2001 (AA587) where the entire vertical stabiliser snapped off at relatively low speed.

This incident was attributed to pilot error (which in turn was due to incorrect AA training) rather than any fault on the part of the aircraft; the FO's reaction to the wake turbulence exposed the tailfin to forces beyond its design, which caused it to fail.

I think that the A300 can lay claim to being one of the most significant commercial aircraft of modern times, not just because it was the first Airbus, but because of the trend it started; it was the first of the widebody twins. It has been an extraordinarily successful aircraft - and deservedly so.

I've been lucky enough to fly on it with JAS, Korean Air and Monarch and have always enjoyed the experience.


User currently offlineLHRSpotter From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2006, 182 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 6304 times:



Quoting Kaitak (Reply 11):
This incident was attributed to pilot error (which in turn was due to incorrect AA training)

Yes, this is correct of course but I felt it was relevant to mention it in a thread dedicated to the durability of the airframe. Especially considering the fact that the same first officer had previously made similar inputs in a different airplane (according to a company captain and in a 727 if I am not mistaken) and the outcome was nowhere near that bad.


User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 3879 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 5994 times:

I have flown the A300 with American Airlines and Thai Airways. An excellent aircraft.

User currently offlineDanfearn77 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2008, 1812 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 5604 times:



Quoting Mortyman (Reply 13):
I have flown the A300 with American Airlines and Thai Airways. An excellent aircraft.

Ive flown with Thai an i would have to agree, great aircraft.



Eagles may soar high, but weasels dont get sucked into jet engines!
User currently offlineCmk10 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 513 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 5198 times:

Are the LH A300s no longer flying in Europe or are they retired for good?


"Traveling light is the only way to fly" - Eric Clapton
User currently offlineYAK42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 4776 times:



Quoting Cmk10 (Reply 15):
Are the LH A300s no longer flying in Europe or are they retired for good?

Five have gone to Mahan Air in Iran, one has been scrapped and the remaining three may be stored at DRS or HAM.


User currently offlineAirIndia From United Arab Emirates, joined Jan 2001, 1641 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 4739 times:



Quoting Yak42 (Reply 3):
In Iran, a very crash prone country with lax regulation enforcemant and bad corruption in its airline industry, the most common type there, the A300 has been the workhorse of domestic and international flights since 1980 without a major incident

Iran is one place where you can get on to the old aircraft types that no longer exist or are very rare.

I was on the Saha 707 in July 2008 to fulfil my dream on benig on a 707....... and A300 still eludes me so perhaps DXB-IKA on a A300 will be done soon.......

727, 747SP, 747-100/747-200 still fly out of Iran......... so anyone with a dream should come over.......

[Edited 2009-12-22 03:09:17]

User currently offlineA300 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 474 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 4133 times:
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Quoting Yak42 (Reply 3):
In Iran, a very crash prone country with lax regulation enforcemant and bad corruption in its airline industry, the most common type there, the A300 has been the workhorse of domestic and international flights since 1980 without a major incident attributed to the aircraft or its maintenance. They have crashed almost all other types to fly there more than once. I dont think they are a very easy aircraft to crash.

Crash-prone, yes; lax enforcement not so much. There are a number of reasons for the crashes in Iran. A number of them were Fokker 100s with landing gear or poor cold weather performance issues. Not so different from several EU incidents (Contact Air comes to mind). Many of the crashes have involved leased Soviet-era aircraft, flying under Russian or Kazakh flags. There have been A300 incidents in Iran too. Speaking of Iranian CAO, they have grounded Iran Air's A310-200 fleet, as it cannot meet the airworthiness directives.



Boland Aseman Jayegah Man Ast.
User currently offlineBennett123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7562 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3857 times:

Has OO-DLL been scrapped yet?.

User currently offlineYAK42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 20, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 3604 times:



Quoting A300 (Reply 18):
Crash-prone, yes; lax enforcement not so much. There are a number of reasons for the crashes in Iran. A number of them were Fokker 100s with landing gear or poor cold weather performance issues. Not so different from several EU incidents (Contact Air comes to mind). Many of the crashes have involved leased Soviet-era aircraft, flying under Russian or Kazakh flags. There have been A300 incidents in Iran too. Speaking of Iranian CAO, they have grounded Iran Air's A310-200 fleet, as it cannot meet the airworthiness directives.

There are a number of reasons for the crashes, yes, but regulation and corruption in the industry is a major factor. It doesnt matter who owns the Tu154s, its the airline and regulators responsibility to make sure they are properly maintained with pilots and other staff that know what they are doing when flying or maintaining them. Some incidents related to F100s should be expected with the fleet size they have, but they are more incident prone in Iran than Europe. The larger international carriers may have better maintenance practices than the smaller players. But even with them their flight crew have done some dangerous actions. The F100 that crashed and burned @ THR in icy conditions a while ago could have been avoided if the pilot had waited for de-icing to be done, a few months ago an IR A300 had an engine out on takeoff from AWZ but instead of landing again immediately, they flew it all the way to THR on one engine and dont forget all the incidents culminating in a very low approach to MAN that got Mahan Air suspended from flying to the EU for a year. Standards are being forced up on international flights out of Iran I believe. But domestic and regional flights are still a bit dicey.


User currently offlineA300 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 474 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3261 times:
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Quoting YAK42 (Reply 20):
There are a number of reasons for the crashes, yes, but regulation and corruption in the industry is a major factor. It doesnt matter who owns the Tu154s, its the airline and regulators responsibility to make sure they are properly maintained with pilots and other staff that know what they are doing when flying or maintaining them. Some incidents related to F100s should be expected with the fleet size they have, but they are more incident prone in Iran than Europe. The larger international carriers may have better maintenance practices than the smaller players. But even with them their flight crew have done some dangerous actions. The F100 that crashed and burned @ THR in icy conditions a while ago could have been avoided if the pilot had waited for de-icing to be done, a few months ago an IR A300 had an engine out on takeoff from AWZ but instead of landing again immediately, they flew it all the way to THR on one engine and dont forget all the incidents culminating in a very low approach to MAN that got Mahan Air suspended from flying to the EU for a year. Standards are being forced up on international flights out of Iran I believe. But domestic and regional flights are still a bit dicey.

I wonder how do you know all of these information and conclusions? The MAN incident was certainly a serious one and a near disaster. There were a number of similar ones elsewhere. The TK crash at AMS comes to mind. The Iran Air de-icing event reflects a poor choice by the pilots. The recent NW overflight of MSP comes to mind as well. The Iran Air AWZ incident needs closer review. The AWZ-THR leg is about one hour. If they had to lose mass before safely landing back at AWZ, they might have elected to fly on to THR. The latter is far better equipped to deal with crash landings and has the IR's main MRO facilities.

I subscribe to the notion that speculations are just that: speculations. It would be prudent to await the investigating authority's final report. In the case of the Mahan Air serious incident in UK, the AAIB has issued its findings and we now know the sequence of the events. There were recommendations made to Mahan Air and the French and Iranian regulatory authorities. They all must have complied, resulting in removal of the EU ban on Mahan flights



Boland Aseman Jayegah Man Ast.
User currently offlineYAK42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 22, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2972 times:

Quoting A300 (Reply 21):
I wonder how do you know all of these information and conclusions? The MAN incident was certainly a serious one and a near disaster. There were a number of similar ones elsewhere. The TK crash at AMS comes to mind. The Iran Air de-icing event reflects a poor choice by the pilots. The recent NW overflight of MSP comes to mind as well. The Iran Air AWZ incident needs closer review. The AWZ-THR leg is about one hour. If they had to lose mass before safely landing back at AWZ, they might have elected to fly on to THR. The latter is far better equipped to deal with crash landings and has the IR's main MRO facilities.

I subscribe to the notion that speculations are just that: speculations. It would be prudent to await the investigating authority's final report. In the case of the Mahan Air serious incident in UK, the AAIB has issued its findings and we now know the sequence of the events. There were recommendations made to Mahan Air and the French and Iranian regulatory authorities. They all must have complied, resulting in removal of the EU ban on Mahan flights

You must admit there is an issue of safety in Iran. The responsibilities lie with the aviation authorities. With the very high amount of incidents in the country they are failing in their duties. Yes these individual incidents may occur elsewhere too but they occur much more frequently in Iran. Its almost unheard of for an airline the size of Mahan Air to be banned from the EU. Do you think its just bad luck? Although the US sanctions are unfair they are not even indirectly related to most of the incidents. Even if a crash is pilot error, US sanctions get blamed. Blame and attention should be more focused on corruption in the industry and government policy and incompetence. After the Caspian and Aria Air crashes this summer, airlines were banned from aquiring used Russian types. This was a stupid reactionary and populist action. If the aviation authorities were free of corruption and capable of ensuring that every aircraft was properly maintained and airworthy, there would be no need for making blanket bans that make little difference. Also government regulation of airfares makes the increased maintenance costs incurred on older aircraft difficult to afford.

[Edited 2010-01-05 08:52:25]

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