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Plane Left On Antarctica In 1912 Is Found  
User currently offlineDAL1044 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 110 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 9118 times:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/34664924/ns/world_news-asiapacific/

"ADELAIDE, Australia - Remains of the first airplane ever taken to Antarctica, in 1912, have been found by Australian researchers, the team announced Saturday"

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJayeshrulz From India, joined Apr 2007, 1027 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 8974 times:

Wow...guess this is because of the ice melting in the polar caps...

A nice titanic type discovery!!



Keep flying, because the sky is no limit!
User currently offlineMMEPHX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 8756 times:

Was it a JetBlue flight waiting on a taxiway for the weather to clear so it could take off?  Smile

Sorry.


User currently offlineKingFriday013 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 1296 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 8517 times:



Quoting MMEPHX (Reply 2):
Was it a JetBlue flight waiting on a taxiway for the weather to clear so it could take off? Smile

Wonder how strong the LiveTV signal is down there...

What type of aircraft was it? The article only mentions it was a Vickers, but a Vickers __(what)__?

-J.



Tho' I've belted you an' flayed you, By the livin' Gawd that made you, You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!
User currently offlineDAL1044 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 110 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 8041 times:

I wonder it there are plans to recover it?

User currently offlineAvroArrow From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 1045 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 7943 times:

From skimming the article and doing a quick Wiki search it would appear that there may not be a model name to assign the Vickers since it was the first one made. It also looks like this aircraft never actually flew in Antarctica but was the salvaged remains of a previous crash brought to Antarctica to be potentially useful as a powered sled. I can imagine that the extreme temps cited in the article didn't do much for the viscosity of the oil or the fuel system setup. Its cool that they found it again. I guess it possible that they may try to retrieve and preserve whats left of the aircraft since the at least one aim of the foundation seems to be to preserve Mawson's expedition. I guess it depends on how easy it will be to extract the remains. Just my opinion of course.


Give me a mile of road and I can take you a mile. Give me a mile of runway and I can show you the world.
User currently offlineBookishaviator From Australia, joined Jun 2009, 246 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7846 times:

It was indeed the first Vickers ever made, referred to (I believe) simply as Vickers Monoplane No. 1, or Vickers REP Monoplane (after its designer, Robert Esnault-Pelterie). A Google search revealed a couple of photos.

And no, it didn't fly in Antarctica, as AvroArrow mentioned. There was damage to the wings after crashing during a demonstration flight, prior to Mawson leaving for Antarctica. Mawson had it converted to function as a sled/tow tractor - according to a couple of local news articles, it didn't do that very well either.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/01/03/2784444.htm
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/12/04/2762697.htm



When I die, when I die, I'll rot. But when I live, when I live, I'll give it all I've got.
User currently offlineDAL1044 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 110 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 7846 times:

I've had little luck in finding out more information on what type Vickers it might be. I'll assume it might have been a one of a kind type for its mission. BTW Avro Arrow I'm also a major fan of that aircraft. If John Diefenbaker hadn't killed it we might have seen quite a few in the air and many still active!

User currently offlineIrobertson From Canada, joined Apr 2006, 601 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 5241 times:



Quoting DAL1044 (Reply 7):
If John Diefenbaker hadn't killed it we might have seen quite a few in the air and many still active!

We'd probably have some sort of modernized incarnation, though the originals would probably be in museums by now, 1958 is quite a while ago. Maybe a few examples, like how we still have a few RAF antiques from that period flying, though the fear is loss, like that EE Lightning that went down this year in South Africa (RIP to the pilot).

Back to the topic (apologies), I wonder how they plan to move it, and to where in the end? Be nice to see it at Woodlands (I think?) next to the Vanguard - the great great grandchild!

Cheers
Ian


User currently offlineAvroArrow From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 1045 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 5149 times:

I googled the monoplane no.1 at Bookishaviator's suggestion and saw some decent photos. There certainly were some neat looking aircraft back in the early days. Even if the aircraft was deemed a failure, things were most certainly learned from it and if nothing else it would have succeeded in making its successor a better aircraft.

http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/vickers_monoplane1.php

And to address the Avro Arrow comment, even though the Arrow was killed off, many of its developments lived on in other aircraft both civilian and military and helped make great strides in modernization and automation in aircraft.



Give me a mile of road and I can take you a mile. Give me a mile of runway and I can show you the world.
User currently offlineScrumpy492003 From Canada, joined Jul 2007, 170 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 3181 times:

Are you sure that it isn't Amelia Earhart's 'plane, so far off course because it was being used in Top Secret Antarctic Ice Research ?

Seriously though,
It should be said that it has been found "again".
The article states that it was seen in the 1970's, so the people had a fair idea of where to look, it just depended on how far the ice sheet - glacier perhaps - had shifted since then.
And
Even so, they would know the direction of movement, it was just a question of locating it in the ice to be able to retrieve it this time.

P.



peter b95 c-ghfu
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