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How Do Large Corp's Decide When To Fly Commercial?  
User currently offlineLHCVG From United States of America, joined May 2009, 1600 posts, RR: 2
Posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 2229 times:

Is it as simple as senior execs only get access to the private corporate jets, and then everybody else has to fly commercial? I'm thinking the general policy of the company as to who is allowed to use the corporate jets as opposed to when a CEO decides to ride commercial for whatever reason.

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 899 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 2215 times:

Depends on the trip, the employee, and the company. I know many companies allow any employee to use the aircraft if they have a good reason and time constraint.

NBAA (National Business Aircraft Association) has some software that will help compare the cost of flying commercially with the cost of flying private or charter. It takes into account the salary and how much time is wasted by flying commercially.


User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 2103 times:

Quoting LHCVG (Thread starter):
Is it as simple as senior execs only get access to the private corporate jets, and then everybody else has to fly commercial?

Where I work, normal employees always fly commercial economy in country, business class for international. Executives get business in country, first for international. High executives (above a defined level) can use the jet if business need warrants. Very very high executives may have to use the corporate jet exclusively for security.

Tom.


User currently onlinegolfradio From Canada, joined Jun 2009, 790 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 2017 times:

In one of my previous companies only a few select executives had the privilege of using the private jet. If you happened to be accompanying one of those execs you flew in the private jet else you flew commercial.

User currently offlineMacsog6 From Singapore, joined Jan 2010, 535 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 2003 times:
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I have worked for four or five major multi-national corporations, including the one I presently work for, and tdscanuck has pretty well summed up what most companies do. The main issue is that there is a clearly defined pecking order at most corporations. If you have one of the aircraft booked and the CEO wants it, the CEO gets it and generally you then get bumped to commercial. The list usually goes CEO, CFO, Sales head, Board, and then divisional presidents but gets pretty fragmented after that.

Depending on the company, if the aircarft is going someplace you need to go, you can tag along so long as you remain as invisible as possible. Other companies will not let you go along unless the primary user approves it.

Other companies fly regular routes between locations with what is essentially a private airline. Midwest Express (YX), now Midwest Airlines got started this way as Kimberly Clark's in-house shuttle. ARAMCO operates this way also I believe. You book seats and pay for them just like you would on a regular carrier.

My experience has been that unless you can ensure no one can revoke your booking, like the CEO, you are better off on a commercial flight.

I did once work for a major telecommunications company whose divisional president had a Citation that he used as a personal hack. He lived in Florida and worked in Texas and flew back and forth about three times a week, regaularly refusing to carry anyone along even if the pax had business at his destination.

Used effectively, aircraft are a huge contributor to both productivity and security - the NBAA has the data to establish this - but are often subject to abuse.



Sixty Plus Years of Flying! "I fly because it releases my mind from the tyranny of petty things." - Saint Ex
User currently offlineLHCVG From United States of America, joined May 2009, 1600 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1918 times:

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 2):
Very very high executives may have to use the corporate jet exclusively for security.

I didn't think of it that way, but I guess a VVIP is just like a politician who needs that secrurity of private travel.


User currently offlinejetboy2 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 46 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1887 times:

Quoting LHCVG (Thread starter):
Is it as simple as senior execs only get access to the private corporate jets, and then everybody else has to fly commercial?

I think it depends on the company. This may be true in some cases, but in others not. I'd say that as long as the cost of paying an employee salary for the downtime and other expenses that he/she has when flying commercial is greater than flying the business jet (probably only for very high execs), then the business jet it is. Of course it also depends on pecking order and how many aircraft are available.

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 2):
Very very high executives may have to use the corporate jet exclusively for security.

Why is it such a high security risk for execs to fly commercial?

BTW: Check this jetblue video series out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmDiDJ7QrdU


User currently offlinenyc2theworld From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 665 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1771 times:

Its not just Security. How many CEOs can be out of touch of their company for 12 hours flying TPAC (and that's if their offices are in LA)? In addition, if their flight is cancelled or delayed (and they miss a connection that only flies 1x/day) how much money could the company loose because they couldn't make it too a meeting in time?

Yes there's the argument (well they could fly a day ealier) but that does not resolve the fact 12 hours out of touch...completely, no chance of reaching them untill they get back on the ground.



Always wonderers if this "last and final boarding call" is in fact THE last and final boarding call.
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