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Disappearing Jobs In The Airline Industry  
User currently offlineberyllium From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 7974 times:

A couple of months ago, The Dallas Morning News published an article about drastic changes in airline employment that the U.S. airline industry has experienced in the past decade:

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...22410dnbuslostairjobs.3c35885.html

10 years ago it seemed that this industry could only grow. It all turned out to be moving in quite the opposite direction...

What do you think about the situation with airline jobs 10 years from now (in 2020)?
How do you think this industry (in terms of separate geographic regions, as well as globally) will be evolving in these next 10 years (2010 - 2020)?

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9820 posts, RR: 52
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 7947 times:

Quoting beryllium (Thread starter):
What do you think about the situation with airline jobs 10 years from now (in 2020)?

One area that no one ever thought would be outsourced is now a big target. Management costs are always difficult for an airline to handle, but it is absolutely necessary to have the staff in areas such as engineering, scheduling, parts planning, supplier management, operations, reliability, etc. Some airlines have even began to outsource these areas even after they have been decimated with layoffs to operate as a shell of what they use to. There are contracting companies that will send the management of operations & reliability to lower cost companies in India. It is definitely not the most productive arrangement, but airlines are doing whatever they can to save money.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 26152 posts, RR: 50
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 7931 times:

Well the industry has grown in the last decade. ASM and enplanement are both up.

What has changed is airlines have become more efficient, and things like enhancements in technology have reduced the dependence on labor - particularly in the area of customer service where the internet has take off and changed and reduced entire reservation process while airport ticket counters are ever more self service.

Going forward, I'm sure technology will continue to evolve allowing for more to be done with less, and continued increase in do it yourself services for customers.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlinejflchantha From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 124 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 7871 times:

I think the industry will grow but it will need fewer people in order to operate.

The use of E-ticket systems and the use of online check-in and airport kiosks have eliminated the number of employees needed to staff a counter. 4-5 people could be checked in all at once at the same time as it would to check in one person through the desk. I think this will continue at the boarding areas as well as has been seen with LH at Frankfurt and I think Munich. They now have automated boarding gates where they only need a gate agent to check tickets or keep the lines moving, again two or more passengers can be checked at once instead of checking one person at a time.

As for inflight crews, I see a change in the industry. jetblue, instead of hiring FA's for a career, usually hires college graduates for a few years, eliminating the need that legacy carriers have in keeping a seniority list (they arnt all college aged). In fact I dont think they have seniority? In recent voting, they have come close to creating a union but have not succeeded. I sense something like this might happen to pilots but im unsure. All in all, most of these guys are needed and are worked to death usually just like flying their planes as long as possible. Something like the case of when jetBlue eliminated the fourth cabin crewmember and made the seat pitch higher in order to cope with costs.

Regional airlines will prob have the same structure but will depend on the market and wont prob have the same technological advances the majors will have. (Small airlines in less developed countries).

Airlines will have to continue to cut costs in places such as their daily activities in order to compete or continue to make a profit just like simplifying hubs and contracting work to other companies. This will continue to be a problem when more and more countries open their skies to competitors. much like the EU-US open skies agreements, since not all airlines will be on the same level. Airlines funded by the state could easily out perform an airline in another country if it were able to (EK comes to mind). This is where consolidation and mergers happen much like today. It will eliminate the so call "necessary jobs" in the industry such as the CEO, the planners and engineers.

All in all the industry will continue to grow but it will continue to do things more efficiently and at cheaper costs with the use of technology and the introduction of new ideas that could change the industry.

Jimmy.

[Edited 2010-04-19 23:13:33]

[Edited 2010-04-19 23:39:36]

User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 7353 times:

Quoting jflchantha (Reply 3):
As for inflight crews, I see a change in the industry. jetblue, instead of hiring FA's for a career, usually hires college graduates for a few years, eliminating the need that legacy carriers have in keeping a seniority list (they arnt all college aged). In fact I dont think they have seniority? In recent voting, they have come close to creating a union but have not succeeded. I sense something like this might happen to pilots but im unsure. All in all, most of these guys are needed and are worked to death usually just like flying their planes as long as possible. Something like the case of when jetBlue eliminated the fourth cabin crewmember and made the seat pitch higher in order to cope with costs.

I personally still think many F/As will treat the job as a career and be "lifers." I personally am surprised that airlines have not tried to persuade the FAA to change the F/A to pax ratio from 1:50 to something like 1:75. I think that's a terrible idea and I pray that that doesn't happen but I'm still surprised airlines haven't done that. Airplanes can barely be evacuated with the 1:50 ratio as it is now.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 925 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 7327 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 4):
Airplanes can barely be evacuated with the 1:50 ratio as it is now.

As a flight attendant I don't want anyone to lose thier job, but it really does depend on the aircraft.

You could evacuate a 739 with one FA in the front and one in the rear, each having dual-exit responsibilities, just like they would on an E190. The window exits on a 737NG are much easier for passengers to open when compared with older types.

I don't think the ratio is as important as the ability to evacuate within 90 seconds.

Of course 2 FAs on a 739 would make service nearly impossible.


User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 7266 times:

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 5):
As a flight attendant I don't want anyone to lose thier job, but it really does depend on the aircraft.

You could evacuate a 739 with one FA in the front and one in the rear, each having dual-exit responsibilities, just like they would on an E190. The window exits on a 737NG are much easier for passengers to open when compared with older types.

I don't think the ratio is as important as the ability to evacuate within 90 seconds.

Of course 2 FAs on a 739 would make service nearly impossible.

Yes, service would be nearly impossible. If F/As weren't required for safety (I would never fly on a plane without an F/A, I'm NOT implying that there not important) I'm sure airlines would have replaced F/As with vending machines years ago. I personally think from my own research that there should be an F/A seated at the over wing exits. During a chaotic evacuation passengers tend to have trouble opening them and traffic jams often form at them because of their small size. Also, passengers sometimes open them when they shouldn't. There was an incident a few years ago on FR where some pax opened the over wing exits, on I believe it was the left side of the aircraft, and evacuated onto the left wing while the left engine was on fire. This is just my personal opinion. So on a 739 one F/A could be at the front, one F/A could be at the over wing exits, and one F/A could be at the rear.

On CR7s and CR9s, I often wonder why the rear F/A is seated way in the back in front of the lav. They wouldn't be much good back there during an evacuation. Service duties aside, I often wonder what their roles are during an emergency.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineElevated From United States of America, joined Feb 2010, 297 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 7203 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 6):
On CR7s and CR9s, I often wonder why the rear F/A is seated way in the back in front of the lav. They wouldn't be much good back there during an evacuation. Service duties aside, I often wonder what their roles are during an emergency.

They are in the back for safety and security as well as for emergencies. You still have o/w (2 or 4 depending on a/c) exits.


User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 925 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 7095 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 6):
On CR7s and CR9s, I often wonder why the rear F/A is seated way in the back in front of the lav. They wouldn't be much good back there during an evacuation. Service duties aside, I often wonder what their roles are during an emergency.

I've never worked on a CR7 or CR9, but I imagine their role would be to push people forward, toward the overwing and forward exits.


User currently offlineiloveboeing From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 803 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 6956 times:

Quoting LAXintl (Reply 2):
particularly in the area of customer service where the internet has take off and changed and reduced entire reservation process while airport ticket counters are ever more self service.

Well, that's true, and the interesting thing is the fact that it is still called a "ticket counter," when its main purpose really isn't for buying tickets anymore.

I think I once read on here somewhere that some airlines don't even let you buy tickets at the "ticket counter" anymore, though I once heard that even though things have become so electronic, you can still show up with cash and buy a ticket (though a walkup fare like that undoubtedly costs a FORTUNE and I don't know who in their right mind would carry that amount of cash on them!)

Didn't the European airlines lead the way with the "bag drop" stations? I think I've seen some of them here in the US, but what I've mainly experienced is being asked to take my bag(s) to a baggage security checkpoint drop-off (MCI), but not really an unmanned drop off point.

I know the loss of jobs is a terrible thing, but I can understand why the airlines have been trying to maximize the efficiency of things such as check-in/boarding.

When I went through ATL a few years ago, I was amazed at how DL had automated boarding announcements.


User currently offlineLuv2cattlecall From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1650 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 6811 times:
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Quoting m11stephen (Reply 6):
personally think from my own research that there should be an F/A seated at the over wing exits. During a chaotic evacuation passengers tend to have trouble opening them and traffic jams often form at them because of their small size. Also, passengers sometimes open them when they shouldn't. There was an incident a few years ago on FR where some pax opened the over wing exits, on I believe it was the left side of the aircraft, and evacuated onto the left wing while the left engine was on fire. This is just my personal opinion. So on a 739 one F/A could be at the front, one F/A could be at the over wing exits, and one F/A could be at the rear.

Hmm... good in theory. However, how much would it cost for each over wing exit to be staffed, worldwide? Tens of millions extra, easily, each year. There have only been a small handful of aircraft accidents in which pax lives would have been saved by having those extra crew members, so the cost per life saved is some ungodly large amount. The higher air fares are raised, the more people switch to cars...and that's a great way to increase the net deaths related to interstate transportation.



When you have to breaststroke to your connecting flight...it's a crash!
User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 6707 times:

Quoting Luv2cattlecall (Reply 10):
Hmm... good in theory. However, how much would it cost for each over wing exit to be staffed, worldwide? Tens of millions extra, easily, each year. There have only been a small handful of aircraft accidents in which pax lives would have been saved by having those extra crew members, so the cost per life saved is some ungodly large amount. The higher air fares are raised, the more people switch to cars...and that's a great way to increase the net deaths related to interstate transportation.

If you read my post at all you'd know that I meant placing one F/A ALREADY on board at the overwing exits. Not adding more F/As.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlinejflchantha From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 124 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week ago) and read 6564 times:

Quoting iloveboeing (Reply 9):
Well, that's true, and the interesting thing is the fact that it is still called a "ticket counter," when its main purpose really isn't for buying tickets anymore.

Yeah, jetBlue has built Terminal 5 at jfk with this in mind. Its smaller then usual for a good reason, online check-in and electronic tickets on cell phones are replacing check-in desks. Its also seen in the large security area as well. Now, we are just waiting to see if this was the right thing to do? lol

Quoting iloveboeing (Reply 9):
Didn't the European airlines lead the way with the "bag drop" stations? I think I've seen some of them here in the US, but what I've mainly experienced is being asked to take my bag(s) to a baggage security checkpoint drop-off (MCI), but not really an unmanned drop off point.

Ive seen photos of Air New Zealand check-in but unsure about Europe

Quoting iloveboeing (Reply 9):
When I went through ATL a few years ago, I was amazed at how DL had automated boarding announcements.

Yeah, the screens are used here in jax and at BOS. They are more informative then the FA at times! This in conjunction with self use scanners to board......

Quoting iloveboeing (Reply 9):
When I went through ATL a few years ago, I was amazed at how DL had automated boarding announcements.


User currently offlinepilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3152 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (4 years 8 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 6086 times:

Those mergers you all crave are also a big reason for the reduction. Mergers create a lot of redundant positions and hubs. As the airlines consolidate places like STL, MCI, CVG, PIT, RDU and others have seen a dramatic reduction in service and as a result, staffing numbers have dropped.


DMI
User currently offlineRogerThat From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 8 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 5976 times:

Speaking of disappearing airline jobs...

Does anyone know if there are any non-pilot, Flight Engineers flying these days?

I'm talking about the F/E who came up through the mechanic ranks. Last I heard, AA's last 2 striper retired in the early 2000's. If there are any left, my guess would be FedEx and UPS?


User currently offlineplanesailing From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2005, 816 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (4 years 8 months 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 5836 times:

Quoting iloveboeing (Reply 9):
Well, that's true, and the interesting thing is the fact that it is still called a "ticket counter," when its main purpose really isn't for buying tickets anymore.

I think I once read on here somewhere that some airlines don't even let you buy tickets at the "ticket counter" anymore, though I once heard that even though things have become so electronic, you can still show up with cash and buy a ticket (though a walkup fare like that undoubtedly costs a FORTUNE and I don't know who in their right mind would carry that amount of cash on them!)

I'm pretty sure that the ticket counter in the UK at least is for rebooking tickets because of denied boarding.

I have watched Airline USA and they seem to be able to do this at the gates, though this might just be Southwest.

Additionally, credit/debit cards have pretty much replaced large amounts of cash!


User currently offlineType-Rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 5714 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 6):
. I personally think from my own research that there should be an F/A seated at the over wing exits

Years ago on the stretch DC-8, UA had two F/A's seated in the middle of the plane, next to the wing exits.


User currently offlinejflchantha From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 124 posts, RR: 5
Reply 17, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 5701 times:

Quoting planesailing (Reply 15):
I have watched Airline USA and they seem to be able to do this at the gates, though this might just be Southwest.

You have to walk all the way out to the front? The desk at the gate can rebook tickets, I remember when a FL flight was stuck and they had to rebook everyone while I was working at jax, it was the last flight out. I think most people would grab their laptops or scramble to a telephone although some airports have telephone/ computer areas set aside for problems like this.


User currently offlineplanemaker From Tuvalu, joined Aug 2003, 6441 posts, RR: 34
Reply 18, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 5571 times:

Quoting jflchantha (Reply 3):
As for inflight crews, I see a change in the industry.

There is going to be fewer of them.

Quoting jflchantha (Reply 3):
I sense something like this might happen to pilots but im unsure.

As global consolidation takes hold expect to see more pilot jobs going overseas.

Quoting jflchantha (Reply 3):
Regional airlines will prob have the same structure but will depend on the market and wont prob have the same technological advances the majors will have.

There is a good possibility that ~2020 single pilot RJs will be developed... and there might even be a possibility of single engine RJs.

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 6):
I'm sure airlines would have replaced F/As with vending machines years ago.

Well... there aren't any attendents on Greyhound serving food. In any case, the ave flight is not that long.

Quoting Luv2cattlecall (Reply 10):
There have only been a small handful of aircraft accidents in which pax lives would have been saved by having those extra crew members, so the cost per life saved is some ungodly large amount.

And in 10 years aviation will be even safer than it is now!

Quoting pilotpip (Reply 13):
Those mergers you all crave are also a big reason for the reduction. Mergers create a lot of redundant positions and hubs. As the airlines consolidate places like STL, MCI, CVG, PIT, RDU and others have seen a dramatic reduction in service and as a result, staffing numbers have dropped.

The Wall Street Journal had an article a couple of weeks ago outlining that in the US we only really need 3 international carriers, 3 LCCs and a gaggle of smaller regional feeders.

For political reasons aviation is one of the few major industries that hasn't been permitted to rationalize naturally and it is thus a slow and painful process.



Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind. - A. Einstein
User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5368 times:

Quoting planemaker (Reply 18):
Well... there aren't any attendents on Greyhound serving food. In any case, the ave flight is not that long.

F/As will always be needed on board for safety reasons. Of course emergencies are very, very rare but when the s**t does hit the fan F/As can be the difference between life and death. F/As are required by basically every aviation authority in the world and I doubt that will change. I personally think that there may eventually be less F/As on board if airlines can prove that F/As can still perform their duties in an emergency with less F/As.

I don't know how often F/As have to give first aid to passengers since I can't find any statistics on that but as we all know plane crashes are rare. However, if it weren't for F/As, many pax would be injured since pax would be walking around during takeoff and severe turbulence. In some ways F/As are babysitters.   (I mean this in only a respectful manner.) Also, when passengers do have heart attacks and other forms of medical emergencies, F/As are trained to deal with that. It seems like medical emergencies will only become more common because of the growing number of older passengers. F/As are FAR from being ER doctors however they can perform CPR, use the AED, and perform other various first aid procedures that save lives. Fortunately, around 90% of flights have either a EMT, Nurse, or Doctor on board. However some medical professionals working in the non-emergency field are clueless when it comes to emergencies like heart attacks, cardiac arrests, and strokes. So, in some cases, a F/A with basic first aid knowledge would be able to handle a cardiac arrest better then a doctor who went to med school for three years.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineplanemaker From Tuvalu, joined Aug 2003, 6441 posts, RR: 34
Reply 20, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 5232 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 19):
F/As will always be needed on board for safety reasons.

Not necessarily. Granted that the aircraft are much, much smaller but there are commercial flights of commuter aircraft with no F/As. So, as in most changes in commercial aviation, chnages start at the lower end and migrate up and I eventually envision that RJs could have no F/A. As for timing... it may start in 10 years.

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 19):
I personally think that there may eventually be less F/As on board if airlines can prove that F/As can still perform their duties in an emergency with less F/As.

My posts really only refer to the next generation of a/c... not the current fleet. From the a/c side of the equation, there will statistically be very close to zero a/c emergencies in the next gen of aircraft. As for rare life & death health issues, that isn't the reason why there are F/As, as you have pointed out.



Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind. - A. Einstein
User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 5126 times:

Quoting planemaker (Reply 20):
Not necessarily. Granted that the aircraft are much, much smaller but there are commercial flights of commuter aircraft with no F/As. So, as in most changes in commercial aviation, chnages start at the lower end and migrate up and I eventually envision that RJs could have no F/A. As for timing... it may start in 10 years.

Any aircraft with more then 19 seats requires an F/A. On those flights without F/As there is no flight deck door and the pilots are literally a step away from the cabin.

Quoting planemaker (Reply 20):
My posts really only refer to the next generation of a/c... not the current fleet. From the a/c side of the equation, there will statistically be very close to zero a/c emergencies in the next gen of aircraft. As for rare life & death health issues, that isn't the reason why there are F/As, as you have pointed out.

Well, IMO, airplanes will always have accidents. As we have seen throughout the history of aviation it has gotten much, much safer (Compare the safety record of the DC-10 to the 777 for example) but things can and always will go wrong. Also, you can't have a cabin full of unsupervised pax.

Safety is always a compromise. The safer air travel is the pricier and less convenient it is. On a 73G for example, I don't see why there can't be only two F/As. One for the two forward doors and one for the two rear doors. Of course someone would have to run an evacuation test to see if the plane can be evacuated in 90 seconds.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineplanemaker From Tuvalu, joined Aug 2003, 6441 posts, RR: 34
Reply 22, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 5068 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 21):
Well, IMO, airplanes will always have accidents.

But the next generation of a/c, post 2020, will have virtually zero accidents.

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 21):
but things can and always will go wrong.

But at an ever decreasing rate over time to where the odds are such that they won't be required for safety.

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 21):
Also, you can't have a cabin full of unsupervised pax.

Why not... long stretches of flights have no supervision.

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 21):
Safety is always a compromise.

Exactly, and that is my point. Aviation could be made much, much safer now but from an actuarial point of view it isn't worth it to the airlines.

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 21):
Of course someone would have to run an evacuation test to see if the plane can be evacuated in 90 seconds.

Why 90 seconds? Why not 60 seconds? There is no "real" reason other than to have some sort of standard that hasn't changed even though a/c have gotten much safer.



Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind. - A. Einstein
User currently offlinejflchantha From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 124 posts, RR: 5
Reply 23, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4956 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 19):
It seems like medical emergencies will only become more common because of the growing number of older passengers

Are you a geographer or urban planner. Yeah, there will be more old people now that i think about it.

Quoting planemaker (Reply 18):
As global consolidation takes hold expect to see more pilot jobs going overseas.

I dont see how pilot jobs can go overseas at all. English is the primary language for aviation and there are some airlines that hire from the US.

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 21):
Safety is always a compromise. The safer air travel is the pricier and less convenient it is.

True, as we have seen in the degree airlines have tried to stave off FAA rules.

I still sense pilots and FA are needed regardless, they wont possibly be a career as in the past though.


User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (4 years 8 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 4850 times:

Quoting jflchantha (Reply 23):
Are you a geographer or urban planner. Yeah, there will be more old people now that i think about it.

Its because all the baby boomers are getting older. Its the reason why there is such a high demand for professions in the medical field, because a larger percentage of the population is older and therefore there will be a greater number of sick people. I hope I'm making sense.  
Quoting planemaker (Reply 22):
Why 90 seconds? Why not 60 seconds? There is no "real" reason other than to have some sort of standard that hasn't changed even though a/c have gotten much safer.

Because post-aircraft crash fires are considered non-survivable after 90 seconds.

Quoting planemaker (Reply 22):
Exactly, and that is my point. Aviation could be made much, much safer now but from an actuarial point of view it isn't worth it to the airlines.

Absolutely. The odds of dying in a plane crash is something like one in 9 million, I don't know the exact number. Most people aren't going to pay an extra $100 a flight to make the odds of dying one in 20 million.

Quoting planemaker (Reply 22):
But at an ever decreasing rate over time to where the odds are such that they won't be required for safety.

This could be possible. I personally don't think aviation can ever be 100% safe but it will sure be interesting to see what the future holds.

Quoting planemaker (Reply 22):
Why not... long stretches of flights have no supervision.

F/As are always "on-duty" at all phases of flight ready to deal with anything. Its not like there all in the crew rest leaving the cabin totally unattended.  



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
25 jflchantha : You made perfect sense btw. Just asking if you were a geographer cuz we look into stuff like this in planning for cities and stuff.
26 planemaker : What languages do you think the pilots of foreign carrier's speak when landing at JFK or LAX? It depends upon the time horizon. Obviously over the ne
27 AirNZ : I think you'll find quite clearly that the 'ticket counter' is indeed used to purchase/transfer tickets (where else in the airport could it be done?)
28 planemaker : Interesting that National Geographic would post this factoid on their web site about their new show, "Cut it in half", where they cut a 727 in half.
29 Post contains images m11stephen : It amazes me that people will freak out about flying yet; get into a car, not wear their seat belt, and eat, text, and concentrate on everything but
30 Post contains images SWA TPA : Hi! I work on the CRJ, CR7 and CR9 and you have it exactly right. In an evacuation the aft FA is supposed to herd the passengers forward and towards
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