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Icelandair/Alaska To Codeshare  
User currently offlinedrr49 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 30 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5395 times:

I ran across this:

Icelandair on 03MAY10 issued application to the US DoT for approval to codeshare with Alaska Airlines and subsidiary Horizon Air. Proposed codeshare launch date is effective 01JUN10:

Icelandair’s “FI” code to appear on following Alaska/Horizon routes:

Seattle – Anchorage
Seattle – Las Vegas
Seattle – Los Angeles
Seattle – Portland OR
Seattle – Sacramento
Seattle – San Diego
Seattle – San Francisco
Seattle – San Jose CA
Seattle – Spokane
Seattle – Calgary
Seattle – Vancouver
Seattle – Victoria

Docket Number DOT-OST-2010-0109


http://airlineroute.net/2010/05/04/fias-codeshare-dot/


Interesting, as I didn't think FI did much in the way of codeshare operations. Good for AS?

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAirport From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5333 times:

Alaska? Codesharing with somebody? No way!  

Good to hear, I'd love to give Icelandair a try.

Cheers!
Anthony/Airport


User currently offlineThule From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 100 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5296 times:

Just wondering: could someone explain the workings of this codeshare, and how it differs from their current agreement? The original press release from last year says:

Quote:
Additionally, Icelandair will work in cooperation with Alaska Airlines to provide passengers convenient connections to a host of cities including Victoria, Vancouver, Kelowna, Calgary and Edmonton.

...and a number of trips that include legs on AS are bookable on the FI website.

So, does this just mean more equitable revenue sharing?

Thanks


User currently offlineBigGSFO From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2887 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5276 times:

This is great news. I was planning on visiting Iceland this fall (provided the volcano doesn't F it all up) and earning MP miles will make it that much better.

User currently offlinewedgetail737 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 5830 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5076 times:
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The codeshare is great. When is FI going to be a member of Alaska's Mileage Plan??????

User currently offlineDeltAirlines From United States of America, joined May 1999, 8868 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5048 times:

Should help out on their flights to Seattle quite a bit - this really opens up the entire West Coast to them now. Seems more beneficial to Icelandair though getting passengers on their plane than Alaska, but it definitely does not hurt AS at all.

User currently offlineBigGSFO From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2887 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5023 times:

Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 5):
Alaska, but it definitely does not hurt AS at all.

Nope. But it does give their MP members another option to Scandinavia/Europe.


User currently offlinehatbutton From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1477 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4491 times:
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Quoting Thule (Reply 2):
Just wondering: could someone explain the workings of this codeshare, and how it differs from their current agreement? The original press release from last year says:

Quote:
Additionally, Icelandair will work in cooperation with Alaska Airlines to provide passengers convenient connections to a host of cities including Victoria, Vancouver, Kelowna, Calgary and Edmonton.

...and a number of trips that include legs on AS are bookable on the FI website.

So, does this just mean more equitable revenue sharing?

That press release I think only stated their intention to work out a deal. This new request to the DOT is the official attempt to put each other's code on these flights. So that means that a pax can book a flight on either through one or the other website and not have to buy 2 separate tickets.


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24075 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 4194 times:

Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 5):
Should help out on their flights to Seattle quite a bit - this really opens up the entire West Coast to them now. Seems more beneficial to Icelandair though getting passengers on their plane than Alaska, but it definitely does not hurt AS at all.

You don't have to codeshare to interline and sell one ticket for travel on multiple carriers. I would have expected that FI would have been interlining with AS long before now. All a codeshare agreement does is make the connections more visible in the GDS systems. Many people seem to incorrectly think that interlining requires codesharing. Interline ticketing agreements have been widespread since the earliest days of commercial aviation.


User currently offlinedrr49 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 30 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 3478 times:

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 12):
All a codeshare agreement does is make the connections more visible in the GDS systems. Many people seem to incorrectly think that interlining requires codesharing. Interline ticketing agreements have been widespread since the earliest days of commercial aviation.

A codeshare agreement does more than that. While you are correct that interline ticketing agreements have been around for a long time, such an agreement still has you flying on 2 distinct tickets. With a codeshare, you have only one ticket. In this case it would be a ticket on FI for travel on FI to the codeshare city final destination.

Per terms of the agreement, AS (Operating Carrier) makes available to FI (Marketing Carrier) a certain number of seats in a specific fare bucket designated for FI to sell to its passengers, to enable travel beyond the FI operated destination, and that seat inventories will be managed by AS in a manner that provides incentive for FI to sell the designated AS seat inventory. This from the agreement:

2.6. Subject to clause 21, the Operating Carrier will determine, independently
and at its sole discretion, the number of seats on its flights (including flights
operated as Codeshare flights) that will be made available in a particular
reservation booking designator. With respect to inventory management on
the Codeshare flights, the parties acknowledge and agree that the Operating
Carrier will manage its seat inventories in a manner that provides an incentive
for the Marketing Carrier to sell the inventory of the Operating Carrier and for
the Operating Carrier to accept the inventory requests of the Marketing
Carrier without subjecting the Operating Carrier to disproportionate risk of
revenue dilution and while preserving for the Operating Carrier the integrity of
its inventory management system in order for the Operating Carrier to
maximize its profitability.


http://www.regulations.gov/search/Re...l#docketDetail?R=DOT-OST-2010-0109


Yes, interline ticketing agreements have been about for decades, but codeshare agreements provide the method and incentive to sell the seat inventory of the codeshare partner as if it was their own, as limited by the terms of the agreement. Much more than just GDS visibility.


User currently offlinedrr49 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 30 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 3163 times:

Perhaps this best explains ticketing and travel, with connecting flights on 2 carriers: first as an interline agreement, and then as a code share. This is the difference:

Example 2 – passenger travelling on a connecting journey

B3.5 In this example, the passenger makes a connecting journey, travelling from the Origin
A, via a gateway destination B, to a “behind point” C. The passenger flies on Blue
Airlines from A to B, and on Red Airlines from B to C. An example would be a
passenger flying on British Airways from London Heathrow to Dallas, and then on
American Airlines from Dallas to Albuquerque.

B3.6 In a normal “interline” situation, the passenger would book onto flight Blue345, and
then Red890. However, in a code-share, the passenger books the whole journey on
Blue Airlines, firstly on flight Blue345 and secondly on (marketing) flight Blue678.

B3.7 Whereas in the interline situation, the through fare from A to C may need to be
“constructed” from the component airline fares, or on interlinable “YY” fares agreed
at IATA, in the code-share case, Blue Airlines will create a fare specifically for the
journey A to C (based on whatever it feels is appropriate for the market in question).

This fare may have a “fare basis” code (e.g. QAPX), requiring booking to a specific
booking class (class Q in the example given).


B3.8 In order for the passenger’s booking to be accepted, seat inventory needs to be
available on both sectors of the journey. For AB sector on Blue345 (operated by Blue
Airlines), the booking system simply checks whether inventory is available in Q class.
For the BC sector, on Blue678, the booking system must communicate with the Red
Airlines system, and check whether inventory is available in L class (the Red class
that maps to Blue’s Q class) on Red Airlines’ flight Red890.



http://ec.europa.eu/competition/sect...sport/reports/airlinecodeshare.pdf


User currently offlinedrr49 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 30 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 3094 times:

I forgot to add that the code share request was approved today, not that approval was in doubt:

DEPARTMENT ACTION ON APPLICATION IN DOCKET DOT-OST-2010-0109

Joint Application of Alaska Airlines, Inc. (Alaska) and Horizon Air Industries, Inc.
(Horizon) (together, the "Joint Applicants") for Blanket Statements of Authorization
to display Icelandair's "FI*" designator code on flights operated by Alaska or
its affiliate Horizon (i) between points in the United States and (ii) between points in the
United States and Canada, for the purpose of transporting Icelandair's Iceland-U.S. and
Iceland-Canada traffic'
(fded April 27,2010)'
Approved under assigned authority (14 CFR §385.13)
Date of Action: May 7.2010


http://www.regulations.gov/search/Re...l#docketDetail?R=DOT-OST-2010-0109

[Edited 2010-05-07 21:47:12]

User currently offlinemhockey31091 From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 81 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2888 times:
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That's a cool deal, it just seems like an awkward match for code share partners, but right on!

User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 25
Reply 13, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2803 times:

Quoting drr49 (Thread starter):
Good for AS?

It's always good for AS. Any codeshare they do is always good for AS and their Mileage Plan customers.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlinewedgetail737 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 5830 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2749 times:
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Quoting mhockey31091 (Reply 12):
it just seems like an awkward match for code share partners,

Not really. SEA is the only west coast destination for FI. With AS being the hub carrier here, it makes perfect sense. I just wish AS would add FI to their MP list of airline partners.


User currently offlineBigGSFO From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2887 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2673 times:

Quoting wedgetail737 (Reply 14):
I just wish AS would add FI to their MP list of airline partners.

I would imagine that would be the next step, yes?


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24075 posts, RR: 22
Reply 16, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 2364 times:

Quoting drr49 (Reply 9):
While you are correct that interline ticketing agreements have been around for a long time, such an agreement still has you flying on 2 distinct tickets.

Sorry, but that is completely incorrect. An interline ticketing agreement permits one airline to issue a ticket that includes travel on any number of other airlines with which it has an agreement. That has been the practice for decades. There is no need to codeshare to do that.


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