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Boeing Start Final Assembly Of 1st 747-8I  
User currently offlineNYC777 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 5796 posts, RR: 47
Posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 19900 times:

Boeing announced the start of final assembly of the first 747-8I. Assembly of the wing for the airplane started when Boeing loaded spars and wing skins into an assembly machine at Everett.

"Boeing Begins Assembly of First 747-8 Intercontinental
EVERETT, Wash., May 8 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Boeing (NYSE: BA) today announced it began assembly of the first 747-8 Intercontinental at the factory in Everett, Wash. Late this week, mechanics took the first step in major assembly for the new airplane by loading its wing panels and spars in the assembly tools. The spar is the internal support structure that runs through the full length of the wing.

"This milestone symbolizes the dedication, focus and hard work that our team, suppliers and customers have invested in designing this wonderful airplane," said Mo Yahyavi, vice president and general manager of the 747 program, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. "The 747-8 Intercontinental will provide our customers with increased levels of passenger comfort, greatly improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions and noise."

Deutsche Lufthansa AG was the first airline to order the new, fuel-efficient passenger airplane, contracting for 20 747-8 Intercontinentals, with purchase rights for an additional 20. "We are very pleased to see that the production on the 747-8 Intercontinental has begun," said Nico Buchholz, senior vice president, Corporate Fleet of Deutsche Lufthansa AG. "We are looking forward to welcoming the aircraft in our fleet as it is a component of Lufthansa's strategy to modernize its fleet and increase environmental stewardship. The 747-8 shows our clear commitment to customer orientation."

The new 747-8 Intercontinental is stretched 18.3 feet (5.6 m) from the 747-400 to provide 467 seats -- 51 more than its predecessor -- in a three-class configuration. GEnx-2B engines and a new wing design provide airlines a quieter, more fuel-efficient airplane. The 747-8 is 16 percent more fuel efficient and creates a 30 percent smaller noise footprint than its predecessor. The 747-8 also provides nearly equivalent trip costs and 13 percent lower seat-mile costs than the 747-400, plus 26 percent greater cargo volume.

The 747-8 interior incorporates features from the 787 Dreamliner, including a new curved, upswept architecture that gives passengers a greater sense of space and comfort while adding more room for personal belongings. The architecture is accentuated by lighting technology that provides smooth transitions for a more restful flight.

The 747-8, which includes the 747-8 Intercontinental and the 747-8 Freighter, was launched in November 2005. Boeing has 108 orders for the 747-8 -- 32 for the 747-8 Intercontinental and 76 for the 747-8 Freighter. The first 747-8 Intercontinental is scheduled to deliver in late 2011."



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20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKingFriday013 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 1304 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 18328 times:

Woohoo! About time!  

I can't wait to see it and maybe even fly on it! Best of luck to Boeing.

Will they have to go through all of the tests the 748F went through, like wing break, cold soak, etc.?

-J.

[Edited 2010-05-08 22:08:15]


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User currently offlinejetboy2 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 46 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 18186 times:

Good news... Can't wait to see it in the air.

Does anyone happen to know what the timeframe is for assembly? When will it come off the line?


User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 997 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 17972 times:

Quoting KingFriday013 (Reply 1):
Will they have to go through all of the tests the 748F went through, like wing break, cold soak, etc.?

Boeing won't perform a wing break on the 747-8. It's being certified as a derivative of previous generation 747. As such, a 150% load limit test is not required.


User currently offlinehannahpa From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 128 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 14160 times:
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Quoting jetboy2 (Reply 2):
Does anyone happen to know what the timeframe is for assembly? When will it come off the line?

As far as I know, the latest is, that first flight is going to happen by the end of 2010.
If anyone has any more recent information, please share.

P


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 13624 times:
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Quoting NYC777 (Thread starter):
Boeing announced the start of final assembly of the first 747-8I. Assembly of the wing for the airplane started when Boeing loaded spars and wing skins into an assembly machine at Everett.

"Boeing Begins Assembly of First 747-8 Intercontinental
EVERETT, Wash., May 8 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Boeing (NYSE: BA) today announced it began assembly of the first 747-8 Intercontinental at the factory in Everett, Wash. Late this week, mechanics took the first step in major assembly for the new airplane by loading its wing panels and spars in the assembly tools. The spar is the internal support structure that runs through the full length of the wing.

Just FYI: If Boeing is just now assemblying spars and wing panels then the aircraft is a LONG way yet from FINAL assembly.... Final assembly starts when all the major sections (wing, fuselage sections, etc) are arranged for joining.

[Edited 2010-05-09 05:37:57]


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User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12856 posts, RR: 25
Reply 6, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 12802 times:

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 5):
Just FYI: If Boeing is just now assemblying spars and wing panels then the aircraft is a LONG way yet from FINAL assembly.... Final assembly starts when all the major sections (wing, fuselage sections, etc) are arranged for joining.

Yes, and AFAIK the wings for the -8i are the same as the ones for the -8F so it's a milestone worth mentioning but nothing all that unique or unexpected.



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User currently offlineflylku From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 826 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 11589 times:

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 5):
mechanics took the first step in major assembly for the new airplane by loading its wing panels and spars in the assembly tools. The spar is the internal support structure that runs through the full length of the wing.
Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 5):
Just FYI: If Boeing is just now assemblying spars and wing panels then the aircraft is a LONG way yet from FINAL assembly.... Final assembly starts when all the major sections (wing, fuselage sections, etc) are arranged for joining.

Someone here will know for sure but I thought that this step is analogous to laying the keel of a boat and is done in the final assembly hall.



...are we there yet?
User currently offlineDelimit From United States of America, joined Jan 2009, 1513 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 11297 times:

Yay! It's going to be the best looking thing in the skies*. The larger engnes...the extended upper deck...   



*unless Concorde somehow flies again.

[Edited 2010-05-09 08:47:04]

User currently offlineORDFan From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 378 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 10520 times:

Does anyone have a good idea what airports can expect to see these lovely -8Is? Would love to see LH and KE bring them to ORD. With 20 ordered, LH can be quite versatile with their -8I fleet, but where are KE planning on using their 5 birds? Will they be relegated to high-density pan-Asian routes?

User currently offlinewarren747sp From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 1169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 10412 times:

Just curious who are the other customes beside LH and KE?


747SP
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31259 posts, RR: 85
Reply 11, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 10021 times:
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Quoting warren747sp (Reply 10):
Just curious who are the other customes beside LH and KE?

They're private business jets.


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 9699 times:
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Quoting flylku (Reply 7):
Someone here will know for sure but I thought that this step is analogous to laying the keel of a boat and is done in the final assembly hall.

No. Boeing builds aircraft in major subassemblies, then moves the subassemblies to the final assembly line. Airbus is very similiar. Reduces the time the aircraft spends in final assembly.

In the 737s case the entire fuselage is built in Wichita before being moved to final assembly in Renton.


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User currently offlineEDICHC From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 9523 times:

Quoting DfwRevolution (Reply 3):
Boeing won't perform a wing break on the 747-8. It's being certified as a derivative of previous generation 747. As such, a 150% load limit test is not required.

I don't quite understand this given....

Quoting NYC777 (Thread starter):
and a new wing design

How can a new wing design bypass the 150% load limit test?


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 9266 times:
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Quoting EDICHC (Reply 13):
How can a new wing design bypass the 150% load limit test?

When it's structure is largely similiar to a wing that has already passed the test. Many times when a manufacture says a derivative aircraft has an all "new" wing they are referring to the aerodynamics, which can be changed with new leading edges, control surfaces, twist, etc without changing the structure in major way.

Quite often when major structures are given ultimate load tests, the test is designed to allow for future growth versions - this way the test only has to be done once. For example the 777 wing went to 154%, as designed, before it broke.



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User currently offlineJacobin777 From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 14968 posts, RR: 59
Reply 15, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 8840 times:

Quoting ORDFan (Reply 9):
Does anyone have a good idea what airports can expect to see these lovely -8Is? Would love to see LH and KE bring them to ORD. With 20 ordered, LH can be quite versatile with their -8I fleet, but where are KE planning on using their 5 birds? Will they be relegated to high-density pan-Asian routes?

LH has stated SFO and possibly ORD are two destinations for the B748I...!



"Up the Irons!"
User currently offlineflylku From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 826 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 5888 times:

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 12):
No. Boeing builds aircraft in major subassemblies, then moves the subassemblies to the final assembly line. Airbus is very similiar. Reduces the time the aircraft spends in final assembly.

Right. What I meant was that the wing box is the first sub-assembly put in place, in the case of the 747 and the rest are added to it as final assembly progresses. See this link:

http://web7.bernama.com/bernama/newspic/bu/062909-K64727-01.JPG



...are we there yet?
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5790 times:
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Quoting flylku (Reply 16):
Right. What I meant was that the wing box is the first sub-assembly put in place, in the case of the 747 and the rest are added to it as final assembly progresses.

Yes. But this is not what's happening with the 747-8i at the moment. What's happening now is that the subassemblies are starting to be built. FINAL assembly - pictured in the link you gave - is a ways off

When you said "laying the keel" I pictured the traditional age old process where the ship is built entirely in the graving dock and the keel laying represents the start of fabrication.

Getty Images



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User currently offlineflylku From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 826 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5680 times:

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 17):

When you said "laying the keel" I pictured the traditional age old process where the ship is built entirely in the graving dock and the keel laying represents the start of fabrication.

True. However the modern aircraft carrier is built in a similar manner to the modern jetliner: large sub-assemblies are brought together in final assembly process. What I don't know is whether they lay a keel, similar to what you showed in your image, and then join the sub-assemblies around it. Anyway, I took the tour of the Boeing plant years ago and saw the final assembly hall. I recall that final assembly starts with the wing box around which all the other sub-assemblies are joined and I was making a comparison between that and the keel of a ship.



...are we there yet?
User currently offlinedeltajfk From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 16 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 5530 times:

http://blog.seattlepi.com/aerospace/archives/205155.asp#extended
a nice article i found on the subject.


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (4 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 5358 times:
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Quoting flylku (Reply 18):
What I don't know is whether they lay a keel, similar to what you showed in your image, and then join the sub-assemblies around it.

There's a keel beam - but it's part of a subassembly. No keel laying in the traditional sense.



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