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Feds Considering Banning Peanuts On Planes  
User currently offlineKBUF From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 512 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 1 month 21 hours ago) and read 14212 times:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100611/ap_on_bi_ge/us_peanuts_on_planes

I honestly don't see a point in banning them. Many airlines (such as UACO, US, and B6 to name a few) don't even serve peanuts, so as long as you book you flights accordingly, there shouldn't be a problem.


"Starting today, the Buffalo Sabres' reason for existence will be to win a Stanley Cup."-Terry Pegula, February 22, 2011
101 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3560 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 month 20 hours ago) and read 14203 times:

Typical case of "whats your problem is now my problem"

I ask...whats next? Let's protect everyone and everything until EVERYONE is completely safe 100% of the time

Simplistic view, but I don't care to get into at this hour



A,G,A...nobody rides for free
User currently onlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21423 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 month 20 hours ago) and read 14149 times:

This is utter crap. I like peanuts, and I miss having them on flights. I'm very understanding of allergies, and if there's an allergic passenger on my flight I'd be fine with not serving them. But to ban them entirely is ludicrous.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15692 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 month 20 hours ago) and read 14111 times:

I'm allergic to peanuts, and my allergies are pretty bad in the big scheme of things, but sitting next to someone eating peanuts won't cause me any harm.

This whole thing seems like overkill.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinetennis69 From Qatar, joined Apr 2007, 399 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 month 20 hours ago) and read 14095 times:
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So .6% of the US population has a problem with peanuts and the government wants to ban them from the remaining 99.4% of the population. As soon as this ban comes into effect, you can bet I'll bring peanuts on every flight I'm on and mine will be in the shell so you can imagine the dust flying through the air.

User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13476 posts, RR: 62
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 month 20 hours ago) and read 14088 times:
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What's next? A far higher percentage of the population has mild, moderate or severe allegies to pet dander, yet many airlines have no problem with transporting one or more pets in the same pressurized metal tube with recirculating air as passengers.

Can't see why the government would step in here.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineXT6Wagon From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 3378 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 month 20 hours ago) and read 14054 times:

I wonder how many hundreds (thousands?) of people have breathing problems and they haven't yet banned perfumes, cologne, and other noxious chemicals from planes.

seriously someone needs to sue the peanut brigade to hell and back. Its getting very old the lack of responsiblity they show. Somehow its everyone but thier problem.


User currently offlineAntoniemey From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 1555 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 month 20 hours ago) and read 13940 times:

If the government bans peanuts being served on aircraft I'm bringing a big tin of Honey Roasted peanuts with me on my next flight. I understand people are allergic, but I would imagine anyone so allergic to peanuts that the mere presence of them causes a reaction probably either lives in a bubble or carries medication with them wherever they go.


Make something Idiot-proof, and the Universe will make a more inept idiot.
User currently offlineiceberg210 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 147 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 month 19 hours ago) and read 13917 times:

As someone who is deathly allergic to peanuts I think it says something when even I say that this is just utter insanity. While I'll never eat one, (don't want to die and all) peanuts are not going to come grab me in the middle of the night and kill me while I'm asleep, and the Federal government thus doesn't need to protect me from them. On my favorite airline Southwest they serve peanuts and while buying your ticket you can click a little box under the "Disabilities special services etc" groupings that says you have a peanut dust allergy. If you are really that sensitive to peanuts just click that box and your flight will be peanut free. This seems to me to be the perfect solution, if people need this service offer it, if they don't then let people have their peanuts. To me it'd be a tragedy if the federal government were to ruin one of the great Southwest traditions of flying for peanuts, and then getting them on board.

Don't overstep your bounds Mr. Government, we (peanut allergy suffers included) can take good care of ourselves thank you very much.



Erik Berg (Foster's is over but never forgotten)
User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 month 19 hours ago) and read 13763 times:

Excuse me for my lack of knowledge about peanut allergies, but couldn't someone who suffers from peanut allergies wear a mask for the duration of the flight? These could be stored in the galley and if a passenger requested one the F/As could give a mask to them...


My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3560 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (4 years 1 month 19 hours ago) and read 13742 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 10):
Excuse me for my lack of knowledge about peanut allergies, but couldn't someone who suffers from peanut allergies wear a mask for the duration of the flight? These could be stored in the galley and if a passenger requested one the F/As could give a mask to them...

Maybe, but apparently its a better idea to inconvenience the other 100+ pax because of 1.



A,G,A...nobody rides for free
User currently offlineUAFAN17 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 120 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (4 years 1 month 18 hours ago) and read 13637 times:

This is pretty ridiculous, a good solution I think is what my mom said happened on her flight to NY on B6, they didn't serve peanuts within 4 (or 6) rows of the person that was allergic.

User currently offlinePHXtoDCAtoMSP From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 299 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 1 month 18 hours ago) and read 13626 times:

Quoting Antoniemey (Reply 8):
I understand people are allergic, but I would imagine anyone so allergic to peanuts that the mere presence of them causes a reaction probably either lives in a bubble or carries medication with them wherever they go.

THIS is utter ignorance. While I have mixed feelings about any outight ban of peanuts...this is just an ignorant statement. Peanut dust can be gravely serious to a decent population of people. In most everyday life this level of reaction will not affect them...put them on a small enclosed tube for several hours with a plane full of peanut packages...and yes...it will affect them to where they could have trouble breathing


User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3560 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (4 years 1 month 18 hours ago) and read 13507 times:

Quoting PHXtoDCAtoMSP (Reply 13):
THIS is utter ignorance. While I have mixed feelings about any outight ban of peanuts...this is just an ignorant statement. Peanut dust can be gravely serious to a decent population of people. In most everyday life this level of reaction will not affect them...put them on a small enclosed tube for several hours with a plane full of peanut packages...and yes...it will affect them to where they could have trouble breathing

Thats not the point.

The point is that we might as well cater to everything else that bothers people, since out of a given sample of people, anything is bound to bother anyone. Given your example, we might as well ban perfumes/colognes, since those are airborne products as well...



A,G,A...nobody rides for free
User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15692 posts, RR: 26
Reply 14, posted (4 years 1 month 18 hours ago) and read 13504 times:

Quoting PHXtoDCAtoMSP (Reply 13):
THIS is utter ignorance

Actually, as a matter of fact I do carry medicine with me wherever I go. I have an epinephrine auto-injector (which I have never used) and I almost always have some Benadryl tablets (also useful as a sleeping pill) with me as well. If I am in an environment where there are a lot of nuts or peanuts or accidentally eat something containing nuts or peanuts (I once found nuts in Jello of all things) I just pop the Benadryl and it's business as usual. If it is critical that I am alert, I will try and chase it with a Red Bull or Mountain Dew.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently onlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4924 posts, RR: 19
Reply 15, posted (4 years 1 month 18 hours ago) and read 13481 times:

And people who have peanut allergies also claim that peanut dust or oil on the seats can set their allergies off. They wanted to have all the seats on the plane wiped down before boarding so this wouldn't be a problem.


Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlinecvervais From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 610 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (4 years 1 month 18 hours ago) and read 13457 times:

Believe it or not, there are individuals who can have a severe reaction just coming into contact with anything that has touched a peanut. My toddler daughter is one of them, we have to carry Epipens with us at all times because of this. She has a life threatening allergy to them, so it's serious.

So, it's not as simple as people with allergies just not ingesting them.

That said, when my wife and I discovered her condition we made the decision to not fly with her until she is much much older and capable of avoiding contact with them or anything that has come into contact with them on her own. It seemed the sensible thing to do. So going to Disneyland means for us a good old fashioned car trip. Both of our families live in a 90 mile radius so we don't have to fly to visit family which is also fortunate.

We realize flying is not a right granted to us and we feel we've reacted accordingly and properly. I do not support a wholesale ban on peanuts on aircraft and I applaud airlines that will make accommodations for passengers with this affliction. Especially those that minimize the inconvenience of other passengers while maintaining a reasonable amount of care for the afflicted passenger.

However, it is clear that there is a large amount of ignorance in here about how peanut allergies can affect someone and how they have to deal with it and what's dangerous and what isn't. If people were so informed I don't believe they'd be making some of the "threats" being brandied about. Tolerance needs to work both ways.


User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3560 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (4 years 1 month 18 hours ago) and read 13446 times:

Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 13):
The point is that we might as well cater to everything else that bothers people, since out of a given sample of people, anything is bound to bother anyone. Given your example, we might as well ban perfumes/colognes, since those are airborne products as well...

To quote myself, MY BAD, it has already started:

http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/in...detroit_city_employees_banned.html

  I am about ready to quit



A,G,A...nobody rides for free
User currently offlineAntoniemey From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 1555 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (4 years 1 month 17 hours ago) and read 13421 times:

Quoting PHXtoDCAtoMSP (Reply 12):
THIS is utter ignorance.

No, it's not... I have allergies myself (thankfully none to foods). I have to deal with them. I take the proper medication and if I'm going to be in a situation where something I'm allergic to may be present in a greater concentration then normal I either avoid said situation or make arrangements to deal with it.

Quoting PHXtoDCAtoMSP (Reply 12):
In most everyday life this level of reaction will not affect them...put them on a small enclosed tube for several hours with a plane full of peanut packages...and yes...it will affect them to where they could have trouble breathing

As I said, I expect that a reasonable person with an allergy to peanuts would carry medication. I didn't say, ever, that I was going to toss my can of peanuts on them (nor even that I would eat them... just bring it to make the point).

I'm all for making reasonable accommodations for people that need them. Southwest's option to tell them ahead of time that you have an allergy seems to be just such a reasonable accommodation. The federal government mandating that airlines can never serve peanuts on their aircraft does not.

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 14):
Actually, as a matter of fact I do carry medicine with me wherever I go. I have an epinephrine auto-injector (which I have never used) and I almost always have some Benadryl tablets (also useful as a sleeping pill) with me as well. If I am in an environment where there are a lot of nuts or peanuts or accidentally eat something containing nuts or peanuts (I once found nuts in Jello of all things) I just pop the Benadryl and it's business as usual. If it is critical that I am alert, I will try and chase it with a Red Bull or Mountain Dew.

Peanuts in Jell-O is a new one on me... wonder if that was a test flavor.  
Quoting type-rated (Reply 15):
And people who have peanut allergies also claim that peanut dust or oil on the seats can set their allergies off.

In some cases it can. In other cases the level of sensitivity varies as the person ages or based on other factors.

Quoting cvervais (Reply 16):
That said, when my wife and I discovered her condition we made the decision to not fly with her until she is much much older and capable of avoiding contact with them or anything that has come into contact with them on her own. It seemed the sensible thing to do. So going to Disneyland means for us a good old fashioned car trip. Both of our families live in a 90 mile radius so we don't have to fly to visit family which is also fortunate.

We realize flying is not a right granted to us and we feel we've reacted accordingly and properly. I do not support a wholesale ban on peanuts on aircraft and I applaud airlines that will make accommodations for passengers with this affliction. Especially those that minimize the inconvenience of other passengers while maintaining a reasonable amount of care for the afflicted passenger.

Thank you for being both a good parent and considerate of others. Both are a rarity in today's world.

Quoting cvervais (Reply 16):
Tolerance needs to work both ways.

Agreed, but I would also say that banning an item that will not be an issue 99.4% of the time does not equal tolerance... it equals over-legislation.



Make something Idiot-proof, and the Universe will make a more inept idiot.
User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15692 posts, RR: 26
Reply 19, posted (4 years 1 month 17 hours ago) and read 13409 times:

Quoting Antoniemey (Reply 18):
Peanuts in Jell-O is a new one on me... wonder if that was a test flavor

I don't think it was peanuts, but almonds or some other sort of nut. That same Jello also contained celery, so it was bad all around. It was a waste of good Jello really.   



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3560 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (4 years 1 month 17 hours ago) and read 13387 times:

Quoting cvervais (Reply 16):
However, it is clear that there is a large amount of ignorance in here about how peanut allergies can affect someone and how they have to deal with it and what's dangerous and what isn't. If people were so informed I don't believe they'd be making some of the "threats" being brandied about. Tolerance needs to work both ways.

Informed is looking at the number of people affected by peanut allergies in the US, which the Yahoo article failed to mention (I think)...

http://www.nationalpeanutboard.org/nutrition-foodallergy_questions.php

Estimated to be 4% of US adult population, and same for kids.

Now I surmise that at any given time in the air, and this is being conservative, 1% is flying

I don't think making rules for 8% (ON A REAL GOOD DAY) of the population is necessary



A,G,A...nobody rides for free
User currently offlineCXB77L From Australia, joined Feb 2009, 2591 posts, RR: 5
Reply 21, posted (4 years 1 month 17 hours ago) and read 13377 times:
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Quoting iceberg210 (Reply 8):
On my favorite airline Southwest they serve peanuts and while buying your ticket you can click a little box under the "Disabilities special services etc" groupings that says you have a peanut dust allergy. If you are really that sensitive to peanuts just click that box and your flight will be peanut free.

And penalise the rest of the people on that flight?

I think what should be done instead is schedule certain flights to be peanut free so that people with allergies can pick that flight, while people who like peanuts can choose another flight.



Boeing 777 fanboy
User currently offlinecvervais From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 610 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (4 years 1 month 17 hours ago) and read 13377 times:

Quoting Antoniemey (Reply 18):
Agreed, but I would also say that banning an item that will not be an issue 99.4% of the time does not equal tolerance... it equals over-legislation.

Yup, which is why we are against it.

Quoting Antoniemey (Reply 18):
I have allergies myself (thankfully none to foods). I have to deal with them. I take the proper medication and if I'm going to be in a situation where something I'm allergic to may be present in a greater concentration then normal I either avoid said situation or make arrangements to deal with it.

The problem is there's no "medication" to prevent a allergic reaction in the case of a peanut allergy. All you can do is hope to control the reaction which, is dicey if the allergy is severe. Benadryl MIGHT keep a reaction from becoming life threatening but it's not a guarantee. If it does not the ONLY hope a person would have is the Epipen and even then you need to get to a hospital ASAP and be treated or there is a chance the person will die. Meaning, medical emergency. All the Epipen does is buy you time to get to the hospital.

This is why the decision for us to just not fly was so obvious, you're a ways from a hospital at 35,000 feet.

Unfortunately peanut allergies aren't like pollen allergies which is what makes it dangerous.


User currently offlinecvervais From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 610 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (4 years 1 month 17 hours ago) and read 13361 times:

Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 20):
Informed is looking at the number of people affected by peanut allergies in the US, which the Yahoo article failed to mention (I think)...

http://www.nationalpeanutboard.org/nutrition-foodallergy_questions.php

Estimated to be 4% of US adult population, and same for kids.

Now I surmise that at any given time in the air, and this is being conservative, 1% is flying

I don't think making rules for 8% (ON A REAL GOOD DAY) of the population is necessary

Did you miss where I said we're against the ban? I was more directing my comment at tennis69 and his threat.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19277 posts, RR: 58
Reply 24, posted (4 years 1 month 17 hours ago) and read 13345 times:

I also don't know anyone who would anaphylax if exposed to a hint of peanut dust, but such a patient needs to be on antihistamines at all times. And probably shouldn't fly.

You can't start restricting peanuts from public spaces, that's not right. And it makes no sense because it doesn't guarantee the guy in the next row isn't munching on his own Snicker's.


25 Post contains images Airportugal310 : Not at all. Just throwing in some more facts where the original article casually "omitted" them I actually appreciate your insight into this[Edited 2
26 cvervais : Ah, no worries then. You're right, the article does not give percentages but only says about 1.8M Americans have the allergy. I like percentages bette
27 UAL747DEN : Wow you two look real mature. And when there is someone on the flight who is killed by your stupidity then what? You want to kill someones child beca
28 Aesma : What are the feds doing about the allergy itself ? Financing research, trying to understand why allergies are such a problem now ?
29 Antoniemey : Methinks you missed the point of my post... which, admittedly, I had to clarify some later. I am not going to go out of my way to try and give someon
30 XT6Wagon : Look, people have to take responsiblity for thier own actions. If you have a serious medical condition that can happen at a moments notice, flying is
31 Post contains images PlaneWasted : I don't care. The roasted beans SAS serves tastes better than peanuts anyway. I'm also sure there are lots of other good alternatives.
32 bjorn14 : Sorry but these people can take the train.
33 GolfOscarDelta : I'm allergic to stupidity, so can they please ban the stupid people who get on the planes first and then the stupid people who make such stupid rules.
34 474218 : However, since on a modern airliner here is a complete change of cabin air every five (5) to seven (7) minutes any peanut dust would quickly be deple
35 md80fanatic : Strangely enough, -knowing- your in the presence of peanut dust heightens the allergic reaction significantly. More often than not, the allergy suffer
36 Post contains images ACDC8 : I guess we'll have to arrive at the airport an extra 30 mins early so we can go through the peanut dust sniffer after securtiy ... What if you bring y
37 jetblueguy22 : This is absolutely ridiculous. I have a peanut allergy myself but forcing it on other people is stupid. I understand people are deathly allergic but t
38 CVG747 : Speaking of toxic fumes, I'm suprised airlines still let passengers that smell like poo fly.
39 tim222 : What about other things that contain peanuts like Crackerjack popcorn or mr tom (a peanut and caramel bar in the UK), is the American authorities gonn
40 UA772IAD : Does anyone still serve real peanuts anyway? I recall only being served a cocktail snack bag or a ramekin of mixed nuts, none of which contained peanu
41 EBGflyer : How about going about this in a more proportional manner? Not long ago I was on Scandinavian from ORD to ARN, where we were briefed right after boardi
42 Jetmatt777 : Although I am against this legislation and think the government is overstepping their bounds, I must say the intolerance of others is astounding. My s
43 MCO2BRS : Which US carriers offer peanuts? I don't recall the last time I saw peanuts being offered in-flight! Usually its mini pretzels or some chex-mix type s
44 asteriskceo : Once again, the "gov" tries to fry smaller fish. So stupid.
45 cvervais : I think part of it has to do with the fact that if someone has a severe reaction in a plane the affected person isn't able to get to a hospital in a
46 exFATboy : I'm going to play "devil's advocate" here for a second - while I realize peanuts are a traditional aviation snack, are they really so vital that peopl
47 Post contains images rwy04lga : Instead of peanuts, how about a ban on screaming and seat-kicking brats. THAT group affects a lot more than 0.6% of the population.
48 ckfred : What's next? Banning peanuts from baseball games?
49 bmacleod : Another short-sighted and baseless idea that will never see the light-of-day. I know AC and most US carriers will never agree to it. I don't care for
50 bjorn14 : Because if you read the disclaimer on those nut packages you will find that "these nuts were processed with the same equipment that processed peanuts
51 KaiGywer : DL serves a choice of peanuts, pretzels or Biscoff cookies
52 474218 : That would be less than 0.006% of the of the 310,000,000 Americans have a peanut allergy. So the other 99.994% have to stop eating them. I am allergi
53 dashman : Yea lets have the FAA doe something that really enhances safety in the industry. They are just doing this to look like they are doing something constr
54 Post contains images UltimateDelta : (Puts on flame suit) While I'm sure there are lots of people who enjoy peanuts here, is it so hard to go a flight without them? And aren't there more
55 vegas005 : America---you have lost your way. How about a law that says "though shall not stuff thy face for two hours". I have never seen anyone die of starvatio
56 Post contains images EA CO AS : Years ago when I was a reservations agent, I had a customer whose 9 year old son was traveling to see him (divorced parents shuttling junior back and
57 474218 : ...and I have never seen anyone dye from their peanut allergy in-flight or on the ground!
58 Post contains images BMI727 : I am more pleasantly surprised at the reason of most people, unfortunately none of whom have the power to stop this. Hopefully there is one sane man
59 Antoniemey : No... and if it's an airline's decision not to serve them there's no issue. If it's the government mandating that they can't, that IS an issue.
60 UltimateDelta : Because if it becomes law, then you'd have to. Of course, if they don't pass it, that's fine with me too. I honestly (as mentioned) don't give a crap
61 Post contains images Oshkosh1 : Maybe they'll also ban foul smelling pax...Post a trained dog at the gate to sniff out those with B.O. If the dog "marks" them, force them to take a q
62 Post contains images aerorobnz : I've had passengers with children who have nut allergies come up and ask me to guarantee that the flight had no nuts or nut traces onboard to which I
63 CWAFlyer : It's because the factility that the Jell-O is made in also makes other products and may contaminate the other foods. I've seen peanut contaminate war
64 CWAFlyer : The investigation is not complete. The recommendations from the NTSB and subsequent FAA mandates are not in place yet. Wait. The rest and duty time r
65 Antoniemey : Actually, based on the poster's later comments on the matter I'd guess it's because someone decided to make one of those nasty "Jell-O Caserole" mons
66 ThePointblank : Not only that, some people who may have peanut allergies may actually have a full blown general nut allergy. It really depends on the person.
67 474218 : However, on the other hand: People that are allergic to peanuts should take their own precautions and not be so demanding of people without the aller
68 Post contains links normie999 : Apparently the US is behind the curve here - most European carriers dropped peanuts some time ago. http://insidetraveller.co.uk/blog/?p=1028
69 ebj1248650 : What ever happened to the saying, "Just say no!"? If you're offered peanuts and you're allergic to them, kindly decline. It's pretty bad when an entir
70 CWAFlyer : Pretty hard to take precautions against cavalier behavior like the guy on an earlier post that suggested he would ignore the ban and bring peanuts in
71 Post contains images BMI727 : It wasn't contaminated. Someone actually purposely put almonds and celery in their Jello. As I recall it was cherry flavored so I couldn't tell what
72 474218 : There are 85,000 alcohol related deaths (excluding traffic accidents) annually in the United States, maybe alcohol should be removed from airliners?
73 Antoniemey : Based on the number of traffic-related deaths each year, perhaps we should ban driving to and from the airport as well?
74 cvervais : Please read some of the posts in here or some sites on peanut allergies. People with this allergy don't need to ingest them to have a severe reaction
75 ThePointblank : Unlike alcohol related deaths, which are totally dependent upon the actions of a person, a person has no choice if they have a peanut allergy. Unless
76 cvervais : One other thing I'd like to point out about this and again, don't take this post as support for a ban imposed on the airlines by the government. The p
77 OEH68 : Is eating peanuts on planes a human right? I don't think so. There are plenty of other snacks that airlines could serve instead of peanuts, and they d
78 BMI727 : Of course, neither is an environment with no allergens. If we banned everything that people were allergic to, we would have nothing left.
79 OEH68 : As long as there are plenty of other snacks that can be served, why do people insist on eating the one snack that actually can kill other people that
80 9252fly : Read an article not too long ago that suggested that in the general population,those that live in urban enviroments have a greater chance of developi
81 Airportugal310 : That may be so, but since 6.8% of the world's peanuts are grown right here in the US of A, its readily abundant and cheap (source: wikipedia)
82 ThePointblank : From your reasoning, US airlines can serve tortilla chips, since 42.3% of the world's corn crop is grown in the US. Or, how about dried cranberries?
83 Airportugal310 : Sure. Works for me
84 Antoniemey : I've seen this first-hand, actually... Also, part of it is the level of mobility we have today. You will generally be naturally inoculated against al
85 ThePointblank : Alright, how about a couple of pieces of good old fashioned plain chocolate fudge? At most, a person could have a milk allergy, which most people gro
86 exFATboy : The disclaimer is there mainly for legal protection in case of accidental cross-contamination. In normal processing the machines are cleaned after ea
87 TOLtommy : I've been on a few flights in the past years that were delayed while the aircraft was cleaned because of peanut allergies. I'd love to know if there h
88 aerorobnz : A few years a passenger traveling YVR-AKL diverted to RAR or NAN due to a severe reaction caused by seafood allergy from a SFML special meal served e
89 BMI727 : Such diversions are sufficiently rare, that the costs of such events are almost certainly dwarfed by the magnitude of cleaning planes and keeping pea
90 aerorobnz : Precisely. The bill of course could be sent to the passengers who require the extra treatment. As per a meda passenger who requires continuous oxygen
91 XT6Wagon : Thats what airlines already do. You have to pay them money and get a specific prescription for the flight if you need oxygen for your flight. Its one
92 DocLightning : Let's just do a little napkin calculation: Let's assume 1.9 million Americans have peanut anaphylaxis. Now, let's assume that the prevalence of "dust
93 aerorobnz : II know, hence the 'as per' bit - I work for an airline.. They have to be approved by the company medical dept. who issue a meda certificate for trav
94 CWAFlyer : No. I was simply making a point to those on here that claim this is not a serious allergy and that no one has ever died from an allergic reaction. Ne
95 CWAFlyer : Taking an antihistimine ahead of time does not minimize an allregic reaction or prevent it. All that and an epi-pen do is give the person time to get
96 Post contains links 474218 : From: Atlanta Journal-Constitution newsletter 6/23/2010. Peanut ban on planes sacked: The U.S. Transportation Department is backing off from a proposa
97 thegreatRDU : Of course..it was just a dumb proposal...can anybody be as clueless as Ray Lahood?
98 contrails : My thoughts exactly. I haven't seen any peanuts on planes in a long time. Banning something that doesn't exist any more is absurd. What I'd like some
99 jetpixx : How about banning people allergic to peanuts from flying, since they constitute about .005% of the American population? And it's doubtful ALL of them
100 580fa : Admittedly, I have not read every post in this thread. Sorry if I am repeating others' thoughts: About 5 years ago, I had a passenger come up to me du
101 peanuts : Good grief, a "peanut free" environment? What's next? Bureaucracy gone nuts. Stop attacking the Peanuts already!!!
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