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AA Charges Soldier For Overweight Duffel  
User currently onlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3269 posts, RR: 2
Posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 13043 times:

Is this policy or just an overzealous CSA?

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/vi...dier.charged.bag.airline.khou.html


"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
85 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 854 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 13068 times:

I have no idea what AA's policy is. However, members of the armed forces should not expect special treatment.

As a FA I will gladly move someone in uniform to first or business if there is empty space. I might also offer free drinks or other perks. My airline does not have a policy regarding this though, so they shouldn't expect it.

Wasn't there an incident a year ago or so at AA very similar to this?


User currently offlineAeroflot777 From Russia, joined Mar 2004, 2993 posts, RR: 27
Reply 2, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 13067 times:

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 1):
I have no idea what AA's policy is. However, members of the armed forces should not expect special treatment.

Exactly my thoughts on the matter. They are like the rest of us. Some of us fly planes, some do marketing, some are engineers, some are professional athletes. They are soldiers, they signed up for it, in the end of the day it's their job. No special treatment needed.


User currently offlinexpfg From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 633 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 13061 times:

AA's policy is one free bag for members of the armed forces up to 100 lbs. I believe the video also states this...

User currently offlinewn700driver From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 13060 times:

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 1):

Wasn't there an incident a year ago or so at AA very similar to this?

Indeed there was. I think he got his money back though, IIRC

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 1):
I have no idea what AA's policy is. However, members of the armed forces should not expect special treatment

Agreed. I'm often puzzled by this. In this shameless publicity race to wrap themselves in the flag, many companies have completely lost sight of the fact that most members of the military are non-combatants anyway, which makes them... government employees. Nothing wrong with that, of course, but some perspective would be nice. I'm sure there are plenty of construction workers or day laborers, just for example, that work harder, for much less, in more dangerous conditions, to actually better the rest of our lives everyday. No free college, or rent free housing for these lucky fellows. Where's all their free crap, I say.


User currently offlineXT6Wagon From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 3320 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12837 times:

Quoting wn700driver (Reply 4):
most members of the military are non-combatants anyway

Not so much anymore, We have recently decided to outsource everything including shooting people to private companies. So we pay many times more for worse quality of service than if it was still in house.


User currently offlinetxagkuwait From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 1803 posts, RR: 43
Reply 6, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12815 times:

Quote:
Exactly my thoughts on the matter. They are like the rest of us. Some of us fly planes, some do marketing, some are engineers, some are professional athletes. They are soldiers, they signed up for it, in the end of the day it's their job. No special treatment needed.

Soldiers seldom soldier for the money. They do it because they believe they owe something to the country and/or society that has provided them with much. They might like freedom and liberty and see their military service as their contribution to preserve those ideals.

If you were to stop and think.....were it not for soldiers about 65 yrs ago we might all be speaking German and/or Japanese and you wouldn't see very many Jewish people anywhere.

Soldiers don't deserve anything, but they have earned much. They are in no way, shape, or form compensated as well as they should be so any benefits, special fares, privileges that companies wish to grant them is a good deal.

If you have never served, you don't have a clue. You sign up, knowing that you will endure forced separations from your loved ones for lengthy periods of times, knowing that you will have to put up with crummy living conditions, mediocre pay, and people may very well be shooting at you on an ongoing basis. You don't do these things expecting to be rewarded by liberal baggage check policies and military fares. If, however, those things are offered they are welcome and are certainly a small price to pay for what the soldier does for the country at large.

There is something seriously wrong with anyone who would begrudge soldiers a certain amount of preferential treatment. I suppose you also find it unpleasant that some air carriers will move uniformed soldiers in to F if there is space available there with no additional charge.

Sheesh.


User currently offlineiowaman From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4312 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12791 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 1):
However, members of the armed forces should not expect special treatment.

  

While I'm glad these soldiers are fighting for our country and are very brave, I'm getting tired of hearing so much about how sorry we should feel for them and what all we should do for them:

1. This isn't a draft. You signed up for the army or whoever at some point, voluntarily. If signed up before this latest terrorism war, you should of known that there have been and a highly likely chance there will be more wars.
2. Your son/daughter/etc is fighting in a war, and while it's sad a few are killed here and there, this whole war in Afganistan and Iraq hasn't claimed a fraction of the lives that 'nam and the world wars have. Not to mention how much better healthcare is for those injured.

While I would certainly be happy to go out of my way to do a favor for a soldier, they shouldn't expect to be treated with extras when company policy doesn't say they should be.


User currently onlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3269 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12679 times:

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 1):
However, members of the armed forces should not expect special treatment.
Quoting Aeroflot777 (Reply 2):
They are soldiers, they signed up for it, in the end of the day it's their job. No special treatment needed.
Quoting iowaman (Reply 7):
I'm getting tired of hearing so much about how sorry we should feel for them and what all we should do for them:

Then I should not feel sorry for pilots/FAs/mxs whining about how hard they work for as little pay as they make...after all they signed up for it.



"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
User currently offlinewn700driver From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12679 times:

Quoting txagkuwait (Reply 6):
If you have never served, you don't have a clue.

And if you've never dug a ditch at AM4 with traffic whizzing by, or waited tables in the bad part of town, than you are equally clue-free. These are also necessary functions of a modern society.

Quoting txagkuwait (Reply 6):
You sign up, knowing that you will endure forced separations from your loved ones for lengthy periods of times, knowing that you will have to put up with crummy living conditions, mediocre pay, and people may very well be shooting at you on an ongoing basis.

All of this can be said about much lower paying, but far more necessary positions throughout the private sector.*

Quoting txagkuwait (Reply 6):

If you were to stop and think.....were it not for soldiers about 65 yrs ago we might all be speaking German and/or Japanese and you wouldn't see very many Jewish people anywhere.

And? If not for people willing to work in incredibly dangerous positions in places like Coal Mines or near power lines, we'd all be huddling around campfires every night. Soldiers do what they do and did what they did ONLY because we in america are fortunate enough to have a huge support network for them to do that with. This is something that is far to easily forgotten nowadays.

Quoting txagkuwait (Reply 6):
I suppose you also find it unpleasant that some air carriers will move uniformed soldiers in to F if there is space available there with no additional charge.

Not at all. I just think it's silly that we now pretty have to fawn over anyone in uniform on pain of being un-pc. As said, they're not the only ones with tough lives, and certainly nowhere near the worst off of that lot. It doesn't anger me, but I sure am puzzled by the whole thing, needless to say.


* I realize that a lot of positions in the private sector do not involve being shot at specifically, but there are plenty of other mortal dangers you can very easily substitute to comfortably make the point.


User currently offlineStuckInCA From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 1922 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12621 times:

Quoting txagkuwait (Reply 6):
They do it because they believe they owe something to the country and/or society that has provided them with much.

Correction: They may do it for that reason. Or, maybe they do it because that's what their fathers and grandfathers did. Maybe they do it because they harbor a desire to kill. Maybe they do it because they don't have any other path forward in life.

I'm sure some percentage of them meet each of these descriptions. Who knows.


User currently offlinefrmrCapCadet From United States of America, joined May 2008, 1688 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12542 times:

As a matter of courtesy baggage needs to be kept within weight guidelines. 100 pounds is already pretty heavy. This is a health issue for baggage handlers.


Buffet: the airline business...has eaten up capital...like..no other (business)
User currently offlineBennett123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7194 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12487 times:

I assume that this is hold luggage.

What is the max allowed, (or is there no limit)


User currently offlinejetsetter629 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 438 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12473 times:

Funny how if it was 2001, everyone would be singing a different tune.

Never forget and God Bless our Troops


User currently offlineiowaman From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4312 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12450 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting bjorn14 (Reply 8):
Then I should not feel sorry for pilots/FAs/mxs whining about how hard they work for as little pay as they make...after all they signed up for it.

  

I have relatives telling me how there are plenty jobs available with the regionals..but what they don't understand is not everyone wants to work for 20k a year in somewhat crappy conditions.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 18675 posts, RR: 58
Reply 15, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12413 times:

Quoting txagkuwait (Reply 6):

Soldiers seldom soldier for the money. They do it because they believe they owe something to the country and/or society that has provided them with much. They might like freedom and liberty and see their military service as their contribution to preserve those ideals.

Almost every member of the armed forces I know went in for various reasons, few of them out of pure patriotism. Now, obviously they all chose to serve, but the perks they get are usually an enticement.

This isn't WWII and there aren't ranks of eager recruits lining up to defend.

Many are in it so that they can get their college paid for. Many are in it for a career. Many are in it for job training that will help them later in life (if you were a tech in the air force, that's going to look good when you finish your service and apply to an airline). Etc.

Now, this is a serious public relations gaffe by AA. Americans in general love their military. Somehow, the military and patriotism get all mixed up (which is misguided, IMO) and it looks really bad for an airline that uses red, white, and blue cheatlines and bears the name "American" to charge a soldier for his duffel.


User currently offlinecrosswinds21 From Netherlands, joined Jun 2009, 698 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12390 times:

AA's policy on this matter is very clear and publicly stated: For military personnel, three free checked bags are allowed up to 50 pounds each, whether traveling on orders or not, as long as a military ID is presented. One bag up to 100 pounds is allowed only if traveling on orders. The passenger in question was not traveling on orders and therefore was not exempt from the overweight charge. The agent was simply following procedure. Why is this even news?

User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 17, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 12390 times:

Quoting wn700driver (Reply 4):
Indeed there was. I think he got his money back though, IIRC

The Service Member may have to foot the bill up front which happens a lot but he will be re-imbursed when filing his travel claim. This, however, only applies if he is on official travel.



What gets measured gets done.
User currently onlineUnited1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5815 posts, RR: 9
Reply 18, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 12320 times:

Quoting frmrCapCadet (Reply 12):
As a matter of courtesy baggage needs to be kept within weight guidelines. 100 pounds is already pretty heavy. This is a health issue for baggage handlers.

His bag was 64 lbs....hardly back breaking.

Quoting Bennett123 (Reply 11):
2,245 murders in NY in 1990.

Statistically that makes NY quite a bit safer then Iraq.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casualties_of_the_Iraq_War

Quoting crosswinds21 (Reply 17):
The passenger in question was not traveling on orders and therefore was not exempt from the overweight charge.

If he was traveling from the US to Iraq/Afghanistan/Other he would have had orders.



Semper Fi - PowerPoint makes us stupid.
User currently offlinessublyme From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 515 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 12250 times:

Exactly my thought. If he is on official business, then he wasn't billed, the military was. If he wasn't on official business then what's the big deal?

Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 18):
The Service Member may have to foot the bill up front which happens a lot but he will be re-imbursed when filing his travel claim. This, however, only applies if he is on official travel.


User currently offlineprebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6286 posts, RR: 54
Reply 20, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 12196 times:

It seems to me that CNN is becoming more and more desparate to get something on the TV screen.

Since when has it become the task of an airline company to pay for a war? Wars are paid for by taxpayers.

If this soldier wasn't treated the way he deserves, then it's a problem for the military, not AA.

For patriotism, the soldiers deserve all possible respect, fully in line with policemen, firemen and all other professionals who have a risky job to make life safer for society. No more, no less.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlinestlgph From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 9233 posts, RR: 26
Reply 21, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11991 times:

Quoting prebennorholm (Reply 20):
It seems to me that CNN is becoming more and more desparate to get something on the TV screen.

except i can tell you with good reason it's one of the top-viewed stories on their website at the moment. and it certainly is ranking high in pass-along "tweets". and a 1,000 have taken a peak on this website alone at this thread. so....



Eternal darkness we all should dread. It's hard to party when you're dead.
User currently offlineHSVflier From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 118 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11982 times:

Quoting wn700driver (Reply 4):
more dangerous conditions

like?

Quoting wn700driver (Reply 9):
And if you've never dug a ditch at AM4 with traffic whizzing by, or waited tables in the bad part of town, than you are equally clue-free. These are also necessary functions of a modern society

have you done it while being shot at?

i agree that troops(not all military are soldiers), should not expect special treatment. But it is nice to get a perk every once in a while. Especially for those guys(not gender specific) are on their 6th or 7th year long tour in some desert.



Flown DL, UA, CO, WN, LH, TZ, WO, AA, US, LO, HA, PX, NW, KE, AB, QR, LX, EE, 5Y
User currently offlineboeing6594 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 39 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11967 times:

Look I don't want to get on anyone's bad side, nor do I want to start a moral war here, but I believe, that soldiers went and fought for our freedom, they spend very long periods of time away from their families, and they put their life on the line for us. I think that the least an airline can do is give him leeway on an overweight piece of luggage.

User currently offlinejohnyv From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 43 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (3 years 10 months 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 11679 times:

Quoting jetsetter629 (Reply 13):
Funny how if it was 2001, everyone would be singing a different tune.

Never forget and God Bless our Troops

Amen, I couldn't agree more!!!!!!


25 CX747 : Spot on. I agree that soldiers shouldn't look to be treated special. With that said, a little respect towards a man who willingly puts his life on th
26 web500sjc : 14 pounds is a bit of leeway on baggage. besides american already gives military personel leeway, thats $155 of leeway. if it really mattered to him
27 Post contains images Crosscheck007 : Exactly. I have seen a ticket agent screw up her back so bad because a bag was not properly marked and was 75lbs that she had to have two surgeries a
28 Trucker : This is a no win deal for the airline. If the weight limit is 50# and they let 55# bags go how long will it take for the word to circulate that 55# ba
29 cic777 : It makes me angry to see those in this thread talking about soldiers deserving no special treatment. I'm speaking as a retired Air Force veteran. In m
30 web500sjc : i am not knocking on him for asking (nothing ventured nothing gained), but the CNN thing is a bit over the top, especially when if he wanted to bring
31 United1 : ...and a hundred pound bag can be easily and safely be moved by a person from point A to point B as long as you don't handle it the wrong way... exce
32 cjpark : On a related note Malaysian Airlines charged me $460 US dollars for a 23kilogram tool box on a flight between KL and Taiwan. The extra baggage charge
33 DocLightning : OK, and I save sick and dying babies for a living. I'm a pediatrician. Should I get free luggage, too? And yes, I do put my life at risk. One needles
34 Crosscheck007 : And so do millions of other travelers. How come they don't get more baggage allotment than employees? They paid too, didn't they? They didn't forget.
35 Aeroflot777 : Nope you shouldn't. The state of our economy nowadays. That's all it is. Be happy you have a job. Exactly. So instead of calling media on this, he sh
36 PWMRamper : BTW, UA's policy is 3 bags up to 70 pounds each...
37 aa43e : As a former paratrooper I'm glad someone gets it.
38 aa43e : Indeed, they and I knew going in that it would be a "Thankless" job but we did it anyway so that all would have the opportunity to live the dream. Be
39 aa43e : Everyone who wears the uniform of their nation ultimately stands in the line. When I was in Saudi Arabia during Desert Shield and Desert Storm there
40 exFATboy : Okay, setting aside the question of whether or not members of the armed forces should receive (or are entitled, have earned, etc.) preferential treatm
41 bjorn14 : According to the grunt's wife he did have traveling papers but the CSA never asked for them.
42 EastAlt : I agree with American Airlines. He should have been charged, and was as per the policy. I truly support our troops, however, I cannot support the curr
43 Post contains images EA CO AS : Incorrect. It's an absolute FACT that fees for oversized and overweight bags - in addition to offsetting extra fuel costs - were also implemented to
44 Crosscheck007 : If it was a big enough deal to go to the news agencies, then why didn't he show the papers? Cheers, 007
45 AFORMSGUY : I retire today after 22 years in the Air Force. In April 2006 I was charged for a heavy suitcase at SLC with Delta, but I was on leave and not in unif
46 tjm321 : I entirely support our troops overseas. I entirely support our factory workers, coal miners, fishermen, and police officers, among many, many others,
47 aogdesk : If I were a CSA (and I'm not, I didn't even stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night), I'd rather err on the side of caution. If a soldier was dressed
48 Post contains images brettdespain : Most of you are all splitting hairs. I spent 13 years in the military, I did it voluntarily and I never expected any special treatment. I'm a veteran
49 FlyDeltaJets87 : As a member of the US military, I'm going to shed some light here: This money will not (or probably will not) come out of the soldier's pocket. He wil
50 Mudboy : Thank you for your service! Thank you for your service, and very well said!
51 United1 : ....ask AA it's their policy. ...and the flip side to that argument was that he wasn't asked for them. I am sure that charging people to check heavie
52 Post contains images fxramper : This isn't news. The soldier deploying should be aware of the policy on revenue non-government transports to his duty station. If he was unwilling to
53 EA CO AS : No, it wasn't just incidental - lowering OJI risk to employees was definitely one of the reasons for oversize/overweight charges in the first place.
54 CX747 : Some of the posts here have truly left me shaking my head. Certain people just don't get it and unfortunately, no matter how long we argue over the in
55 Crosscheck007 : ...and it is AA's policy to charge for overweight bags if not on duty, or not shown the papers. I am not getting into a pissing match with you over t
56 Aaron747 : Sorry, not the case here. That's not a canard one can just wave around when convenient. You didn't expect special treatment because you were a consum
57 CoachClass : If I had been the CSA, I would have checked the bag without saying anything other than, "thanks for your service." The next time s/he sees him may be
58 web500sjc : thats you, but maybe you don't know what has happened to that CSA, s/he could have been just repremanded for allowing over whieght bags... once on a
59 utapao : Then they shouldn't. They should find a career that pays them what they need to lead a comfortable life. There is no edict that says YOU MUST WORK FO
60 Post contains images isitsafenow : And old guy now weighs in.......... Put your self in the agents shoes and how did this incident go down? You get into conversation with a G.I(pax)abou
61 spacecadet : Actually, there's not. You're in a country that exists right now because of those in the military. He's going to be in a hospital bed someday tended
62 JohnKrist : BS. My brother served with the US Navy and his ship mates all asked what the heck he was doing there since he came from "a good family". All of them
63 macsog6 : I am a former US Army officer and feel that any soldier in uniform should be given any discretionary break he/she can get. Back when I wore the green
64 tjm321 : I find the bottom part of that almost as ridiculous as you would likely find my saying that the military is financed, and therefore "supported," by p
65 Post contains links and images FlyDeltaJets87 : Sometimes the airline(s) will waive it and sometimes they won't. Lately DL hasn't been waiving it for military without orders. Not sure about other a
66 magyar : This is because there were equally dedicated fouls on the other side (Germany, Japan) who also believed they "owe much to their countries ans societi
67 Post contains images UH60FtRucker : Whoa. Sorry for getting to the discussion so late, but some people need to calm down. Look, as someone who goes TDY OCONUS/CONUS frequently, the gove
68 isitsafenow : Repeating AA dropped the ball. One of the news carriers reported that the G I told the agent he was going to Iraq and the agent replyed SO? (kinda li
69 DocLightning : I get a name change, yes. But I don't get any special treatment on airplanes unless I assist in a medical emergency. And I don't WANT special treatme
70 dldtw1962 : I'm appalled at the thinking on this site. Our soldiers are not looking for any special benefits. Yes, they did sign up for this duty. Yes, they know
71 Post contains images Crosscheck007 : A voice of reason has finally arrived to this discussion! UH60, thank you (for everything, not just being the voice of reason!) Cheers, 007
72 dl767captain : You're kidding right? They are like the rest of us? you realize it is because of men like him that we are able to fly our planes, for me to type this
73 StuckInCA : Sigh. Why don't you go empty your bank account, drive to the front of an army base, and start handing out your money. Clearly you think that every si
74 dl767captain : That's not at all what I said and I'm not sure how you got that form my statement. It's not a big deal for an airline to give a member of the armed f
75 afrikaskyes : While I'm glad these soldiers are fighting for our country and are very brave, I'm getting tired of hearing so much about how sorry we should feel for
76 dl767captain : I understand they are not the only part, but he is being shot at in Iraq while the business executive who is helping build up our country sits in his
77 Post contains links UH60FtRucker : Why? That would be madness. Like I said: we are 100% reimbursed for any expenses incurred during travel. There is no reason to get special treatment,
78 Post contains links and images FlyDeltaJets87 : When I took the Oath of Office, I didn't do it because I was looking for free handouts or special treatment from anyone. Do I like and appreciate the
79 SANMAN66 : Reading some of these. I have to look at both sides. I am a combat veteran who served two tours in Iraq. I have saw some things that I'd rather not se
80 L410Turbolet : While you are at it, shaking hands and extending thanks... wouldn't it be nice to include cops, firemen who put themselves in harms way in no lesser
81 ElmoTheHobo : Not overzealous. He must not have presented his orders. I get, when traveling on orders, two bags at 50lbs when traveling within the 48 contiguous sta
82 UH60FtRucker : I'm not saying that it isn't possible.... but can you highlight one post that you think is military bashing? I haven't seen it yet.
83 DocLightning : It is correct. They are not ENTITLED and should not feel ENTITLED. However, AA policy does entitle them to some special treatment and I hope that CSA
84 Aeroflot777 : You know what the saddest part about this is? No one bashed the military. It's not how it all began. A few members in including myself simply stated
85 srbmod : At this point, this thread has veered well away from the original topic and is being locked.
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