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European Carriers And The 757?  
User currently offlineoverloaduk From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2009, 69 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2700 times:

Why did most the european 757 carriers pick the 757 with RB211's and not the PW engine there some sort of proformace benifits from the RB211

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEA772LR From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2836 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2652 times:

Quoting overloaduk (Thread starter):
Why did most the european 757 carriers pick the 757 with RB211's and not the PW engine there some sort of proformace benifits from the RB211

I think many European carriers ordered 757s earlier in the 757 program and PW was having issues with the PW2000. This was also before the A321 was introduced in the early 1990s which is why orders for the 757 dried up so quickly in Europe.



We often judge others by their actions, but ourselves by our intentions.
User currently offlineRJ111 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2597 times:

Most airlines worldwide picked the RB211 because in the early days it was the most reliable and cheap to maintain of the 2 choices.

UK airlines were also inclined to order RR.

Of course, it makes the best noise too and i like to pretend that factored into it.  

[Edited 2010-07-01 14:02:03]

User currently offlineLAXDESI From United States of America, joined May 2005, 5086 posts, RR: 47
Reply 3, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2518 times:

Quoting EA772LR (Reply 1):
I think many European carriers ordered 757s earlier in the 757 program and PW was having issues with the PW2000. This was also before the A321 was introduced in the early 1990s which is why orders for the 757 dried up so quickly in Europe.

This supports Keesje's point that a lighter and lower range aircraft is more suitable for the European market.


User currently offlineFlyCaledonian From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2101 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2466 times:

Don't forget that a number of European carriers also opted for the A310-200, so the need for the 757 didn't exist in their fleets.

AF, AZ, LH - all were 727 operators but they never got the 757. IB got the 757 to replace the 727 quite late, but then the 757 never stayed in the fleet that many years. BA was joint launch customer for the 757, and it replaced the fuel guzzling Trident.



Let's Go British Caledonian!
User currently offlineAirbusA6 From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 2022 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2360 times:

Well the RB211 gained a lot more customers worldwide than the PW2000, mainly due to it's better reliability I guess, so it's not just a European thing. The overall sales are skewed by the large US fleets, with only AA having a large ~100 fleet of RR powered birds.


it's the bus to stansted (now renamed national express a4 to ruin my username)
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15810 posts, RR: 27
Reply 6, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2330 times:

Quoting LAXDESI (Reply 3):
This supports Keesje's point that a lighter and lower range aircraft is more suitable for the European market.

Oh, it is. I think that the 757 was a plane definitely tailored for the American market.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineseabosdca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5757 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2306 times:

Quoting LAXDESI (Reply 3):
This supports Keesje's point that a lighter and lower range aircraft is more suitable for the European market.

Definitely, except possibly for some of the British and Scandinavian charter operators regularly flying 6+ hour flights in high density configurations.

European operators can't get much TATL flying out of the 757, and for the most part they don't need it to cross a huge continent either.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15810 posts, RR: 27
Reply 8, posted (4 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2301 times:

Quoting seabosdca (Reply 7):
Definitely, except possibly for some of the British and Scandinavian charter operators regularly flying 6+ hour flights in high density configurations.

I forgot to mention that, but yes, the 757 is very good for charter carriers. It has a pretty good capacity, while operating relatively efficiently both to sunspots on the Med as well as destinations in the Middle East in Africa, plus the hot and high capabilities didn't hurt either.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
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