Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Glass Jet Bridges In The US (Historically)  
User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22726 posts, RR: 20
Posted (4 years 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 12526 times:

One of the more glaring differences in airport architecture between the United States and the rest of the world is the fact that we do not use (and, indeed, cannot use) glass jet bridges in this country because of concerns about fire evacuations. I'm aware of that, and had always assumed that no US airport had ever had glass jet bridges. Then, I came across this picture:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Tim Chaloner



Apparently, LGA did have primitive glass jet bridges at one point. When were such bridges installed, and what other airports had them?

[Edited 2010-07-26 17:58:28]


I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAusA380 From Australia, joined Jan 2009, 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 12486 times:

One of the things that I enjoy about flying into the new Adelaide Airport (ADL) - Australia is the glass bridges and the great view.

User currently offlineAV8AJET From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1333 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (4 years 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 12466 times:

KGRK, FT Hood, TX has at least two of the six are glass.


"To fly or not to fly there is no question!"
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 24858 posts, RR: 46
Reply 3, posted (4 years 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 12377 times:

Search and been discussed here before:
Why No Glass Jetbridges In The US? (by Coal Aug 12 2007 in Civil Aviation)

And some technical reasons --
In most cases they cannot meet US National Fire Protection Authority standards.

From NFPA:
"Most bridges are designed and fire tested in accordance with NFPA 415, Airport Terminal Buildings , Fueling Ramp Drainage, and Loading Walkways. When built to the standard, the bridge provides a safe means of egress from the aircraft for a period of five minutes when there is a jet-fuel spill fire on the ramp. There has always been a prohibition on glass, except that a window is permitted in the ramp access door and one in the cab area in order to move the bridge around safely."

more specifically the regulation states;
“There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway.”



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22726 posts, RR: 20
Reply 4, posted (4 years 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 12311 times:

Quoting LAXintl (Reply 3):
Search and been discussed here before:

This isn't my first rodeo... I reviewed that thread, and saw another picture of LGA (also AA gates - would that be Concourse C?) but no further discussion of the history. I'm interested in that history.

Nonetheless, thanks for the condescending response.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineByrdluvs747 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 2351 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (4 years 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 12184 times:

Even if it were allowed, glass jetbridges in PHX during the summer = FAIL !


The 747: The hands who designed it were guided by god.
User currently offlinepnwtraveler From Canada, joined Jun 2007, 2226 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (4 years 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 12119 times:

And beyond the fire issue, they can be saunas in the summer heat and very cold in the winter. Windows frost up and are hard to keep clear in colder areas. So they present a challenge. The metal ones with some insulation are more practical, while being so much more boring.

User currently offlinecrownvic From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 1865 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (4 years 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 11675 times:

Forget about the air-bridges...Just look at the background and ENJOY! Assuming the same PATCO issue occurred today, you would see a bunch of crappy regional jets lined up. Look at how the 727 was the not only the workhorse of the day, but nearly every airline had them. I'm back to reality now...

User currently offlineUSAirALB From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 3037 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (4 years 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 11590 times:

At ALB, at the WN gates, for those that don't know, there are two jetways, one for the rear door, one for the front. The jetway for door 2R is half glass-half traditional jetway material. The glass provides an amazing view of the wing.


E135/E140/E145/E70/E75/E90/CR2/CR7/CR9/717/732/733/734/735/73G/738/739/752/753/762/772/319/320/321/333
User currently offlineCoal From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1994 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (4 years 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 10943 times:

Quoting Byrdluvs747 (Reply 5):
Even if it were allowed, glass jetbridges in PHX during the summer = FAIL !

They are used in Singapore (well, at least for about half of it), which is way hotter than PHX (and more humid)  

Could mention so many more airport around the world that are in very hot places and still use glass jet bridges. Vietnam is another place that comes to mind...

Cheers
Coal



Nxt Flts: VA SYD-CBR-SYD | VA SYD-OOL-SYD | JQ SYD-MEL | VA MEL-CBR-SYD | DL SYD-LAX-ATL-MIA | B6 FLL-DCA-BOS | DL BOS-L
User currently offlinejfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8284 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (4 years 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 10650 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Glass Jet Bridges are popular in Europe, especially at CDG airport.

User currently offlineKPHXFlyer From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 413 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (4 years 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 10044 times:

Quoting Coal (Reply 9):

They are used in Singapore (well, at least for about half of it), which is way hotter than PHX (and more humid)

Anything can be conquered with A/C and low-E glass, right? If they can do it in DXB, they can do it in PHX.

Having said that, until NFPA is modified to allow more glass in the jet bridge, you're not going to see glass jetbridges in the US.

Quoting LAXintl (Reply 3):

From NFPA:
"Most bridges are designed and fire tested in accordance with NFPA 415, Airport Terminal Buildings , Fueling Ramp Drainage, and Loading Walkways. When built to the standard, the bridge provides a safe means of egress from the aircraft for a period of five minutes when there is a jet-fuel spill fire on the ramp. There has always been a prohibition on glass, except that a window is permitted in the ramp access door and one in the cab area in order to move the bridge around safely."

more specifically the regulation states;
%u201CThere shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway.%u201D

A lot of regulations in building codes and fire codes come about because of lessons learned. According to the online journal for NFPA (http://www.nfpa.org/itemdetailjournal.asp?categoryID=1361&itemID=32697), it comes down to psychology. People will not likely try to exit a burning aircraft via the jet bridge if they can see the flames through the glass. Afterall, you're told during the safety briefing to look out the window before opening an exit.


User currently offlinejfr From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 227 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 9587 times:

All the loading bridges at KUL are completely glass-walled.

I don't understand the fire issues. The bridges and finish materials are non-flammable, and there are exits at both ends.

Compared to many PLB's I've seen, the glass-walled bridges do away with the possibility of installing flammable adverts on the side walls, like I see in so many of the all-metal units.

I always thought there weren't more glass PLB's because the glazing is so much heavier than the all-metal standard ones; and the extra weight puts more strain on the suspension and drive systems, and because more aircon/power is required to cool them.


User currently offlinejfklganyc From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 3382 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (4 years 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 9435 times:

The Glass Bridges you are looking at are on the D concourse at LGA's CTB.

Up until recently (and it might still be there for all I know) D2 still had that 50 year old jetway on it with the glass windows if you can believe that!

Midway used the gate when they were in business. AA Fokkers and later MD80s parked there. But it is a tow in gate so it is operationally a pain in the a**.

Eagle occasionally parked an ERJ there, but the jetway was so old that it didn't move up and down so they deplaned via airstairs and a stairwell to gate D1.

Like I said, this info is all 2 years old. Since then they eliminated D1 to make room for an expanded security checkpoint and airside connector to C for AA pax. Unfortunatlely, the airside connector was never built.

But with the decrepit state of the CTB at LGA, that jetway may still be there.

On another note, when I see all the 737s and 727s at LGA in that photo from 1981, and I see all the crap that is there now, I can't help but think how that picture exemplifies how backward we have moved in aviation in the past 30 years.

Long live the Regional Jet! Yea!


User currently offlineKPHXFlyer From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 413 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (4 years 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 9227 times:

Quoting jfr (Reply 12):
I always thought there weren't more glass PLB's because the glazing is so much heavier than the all-metal standard ones; and the extra weight puts more strain on the suspension and drive systems, and because more aircon/power is required to cool them.

Glazing is also more expensive than a non-flammable metal wall. Especially if you need any kind of fire-rated glazing.

I just can't see airlines or airport authorities embracing this issue enough to try to get an amendment to the NFPA regulations.


User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 3845 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (4 years 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 9011 times:

Oslo Airport Gardermoen in Oslo, Norway also has glass briges. Looks and works great !



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Planecatcher



User currently offline727tiger From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 263 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (4 years 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 8813 times:

SGF's new terminal presents a hybrid of both airbridge styles at each gate. Each gate extends from the terminal as a glass bridge to a certain distance, then converts to a standard enclosed airbridge.



User currently offlineSSTsomeday From Canada, joined Oct 2006, 1276 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (4 years 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 8344 times:

Quoting jfk777 (Reply 10):
Glass Jet Bridges are popular in Europe, especially at CDG airport.
Quoting Coal (Reply 9):
Could mention so many more airport around the world that are in very hot places and still use glass jet bridges. Vietnam is another place that comes to mind...

To my way of thinking, the most beautiful airports are the expansive ones that use as much glass as possible so there are unobstructed views of the airplanes. They are less claustrophobic and feel less like malls or convention halls, and don't feel as crowded. For a long while my favorite airport was NCE, because of the glass bridges.

Apparently international airports do this sort of thing safely all the time. I would think that transparent jet bridges at the beginning of a fire are very helpful to authorities because they can know exactly where people are, what direction they are going, what the conditions are inside (Is there smoke?) etc. Looking at a metal bridge, it's very difficult to know what is going on inside.

On the other hand, working on special events usually in Los Angeles, I often see unusual safety protocols in Europe at large gatherings in terms of lack of egress, obstructions, materials used, large numbers of people in an enclosed area, etc; things which I know would simply not be allowed by an American fire marshal. There are definitely different standards.

I concede I am not a safety expert, but glass bridges are one of my favorite things.



I come in peace
User currently offlineFWAERJ From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 3722 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (4 years 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 8284 times:

ITO was installing brand-new glass jet bridges when I was there in 2007 as part of their terminal upgrade project. Lucky for me, TZ's gate had them.

The glass windows were tinted, but you could still see through them.



I don't work for FWA, their tenants, or their ad agency. But I still love FWA.
User currently offlineByrdluvs747 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 2351 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (4 years 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 7474 times:

Quoting Coal (Reply 9):
which is way hotter than PHX (and more humid)

More humid yes, but not hotter.



The 747: The hands who designed it were guided by god.
User currently offlineFLLspoter From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 314 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (4 years 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 5777 times:

ACY still has two jet bridges with at least part glass sections

Joe



FLL justs gets better and better!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
User currently offlineatcsundevil From Germany, joined Mar 2010, 1147 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (4 years 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 5375 times:

Quoting Coal (Reply 9):
They are used in Singapore (well, at least for about half of it), which is way hotter than PHX (and more humid)

I live in Phoenix and unless Singapore commonly hits 110-115F, then it's definitely not hotter. It was 118F about two weeks ago.

Quoting Byrdluvs747 (Reply 19):
More humid yes, but not hotter.

Yes, the only time it's humid is now in monsoon season. Last month we had a day with 2% relative humidity! Either way when it's well over 110F and every single day is over 100F with lows in the 90s it doesn't matter what the humidity is, it's just damn hot.

It's hard to say if a glass jetway would work in PHX putting all the regs aside. A lot of the architecture here has a limited amount of glass for obvious reasons, especially on parts of a building -- like facing north, for example -- that get sun for much of the day. Even low-e glass only does so much. So even if glass jetways were permitted in the US (which I do think they look great), Phoenix is probably not a good place to install them.



1954 1974 1990 2014 -- Los geht's!
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7137 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (4 years 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 5344 times:

Quoting pnwtraveler (Reply 6):
And beyond the fire issue, they can be saunas in the summer heat and very cold in the winter. Windows frost up and are hard to keep clear in colder areas. So they present a challenge. The metal ones with some insulation are more practical, while being so much more boring.

OSL has glas jetbridges, in summer it's can easily top 30 degrees and in winter it's often -10 or worse, I've not noticed any of the problems you mentioned.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Longest CRJ-200 Flight In The United States? posted Tue Dec 5 2006 20:37:33 by B737-112
Google's 767-200 Registered In The United States posted Thu Jun 15 2006 05:42:46 by UA777222
Too Many Airlines In The United States? posted Sat Jun 19 2004 19:41:44 by Yanksn4
Using The Tu204 In The United States posted Sat Aug 23 2003 23:34:23 by WGW2707
Inflight Service In The United States/Coach Class posted Fri Jun 29 2001 23:42:33 by Co LITE
Lakefrong (Downtown) Airports In The United States posted Tue Nov 7 2000 05:27:14 by TWA902fly
Comair To Sue The United States Government posted Tue Aug 14 2007 00:20:22 by KarlB737
Shortest Mainline Jet Flight In The U.S. Is? posted Mon Oct 10 2005 02:05:57 by PanAm747
Snowfall In The United Arab Emirates posted Thu Dec 30 2004 20:07:51 by JoKeR
The United States Airline Industry posted Tue Nov 16 2004 22:24:14 by Planespotting