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Aires 737 Crashes In San Andres: Flight  
User currently offlineRubberJungle From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 39007 times:

As above, from Flightglobal

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...shes-on-landing-in-san-andres.html

125 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSXDFC From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 2352 posts, RR: 21
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 39060 times:

Looks like this is probably the most serious accident with the 737-700. RIP to that person who sadly perished in the crash.


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently onlinesumma767 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 2561 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 38734 times:

I have just heard on the colombian media about this serious crash, who have, as usual, been absolute joke on the reporting, flatly blaming the crash on a lightening strike. They are also not having any qualms in saying that if it had not been for the "pilot's expertise" it would have been a worse outcome. Absolutely embarrasing t make up things like these.

It is good to see the facts as know stated by Flight International.

So we have bad weather, a 737 and a fuselage in 3 pieces. In this respet is sounding similar to the AA in Kingston.


User currently offlinefpetrutiu From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 884 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 38561 times:

Luckly only 1 fatality and 70 people were able to walk away. That says a lot about the plane. Go Boeing!

It was transporting 121 passengers and six crew members. A local air force official says that there is one fatality and 34 people have been hospitalised while another 70 have received local treatment for lighter injuries.


User currently offlinejetfuel From Australia, joined Jan 2005, 2225 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 38581 times:

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/am...tality/#fbid=93S8EZlWzpD&wom=false

News from CNN

"One passenger was killed and 34 were injured when lightning hit an airplane and caused it to split into at least two parts when landing

EDIT - Satellite of airport http://maps.google.com.au/maps?q=GUS...833&spn=0.028356,0.038409&t=h&z=15



[Edited 2010-08-16 05:30:07]


Where's the passion gone out of the airline industry? The smell of jetfuel and the romance of taking a flight....
User currently offlineMIAspotter From Spain, joined Nov 2001, 2775 posts, RR: 24
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 38460 times:

I was reading an article on Caracol (Colombian Media) and it says that the plane was hit by lightning just 80 metres from the runway...

Could it been that lighting struck the aircraft and damaged the electrical systems? or the pilot tried to land even though there were severe thunderstorms in the area and cocked it up.

We will know once the investigators do their job.

The aircraft is HK-4682 (EX U2 G-EZJU) delivered in 2003.

Amongst the passengers there were 3 Brazilians and 1 US citizen.

MIAspotter.



I think, therefore I don´t fly Ryanair.
User currently offlineaerdingus From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 2836 posts, RR: 15
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 38311 times:

Jesus, just heard this on the news.

Can't believe someone died...tragic.

R.I.P.



Cabin crew blog http://dolefuldolegirl.blogspot.ie/
User currently offlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9821 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 38200 times:

This is sad news, I hope all remaining passengers and crew are safe with no further fatalities. RIP to the casualty so far.

A388


User currently onlinesumma767 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 2561 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 38218 times:

A photo (taken with a mobile phone) can be seen here: http://www.elespectador.com/noticias...n-andres-deja-un-muerto-y-114-heri

It must have been a very violent crash judging by the complete separation of the front of the plane, and the way they ended up.


User currently offlineMIAspotter From Spain, joined Nov 2001, 2775 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 38132 times:

Quoting summa767 (Reply 8):
A photo (taken with a mobile phone)

DAMN!

Yup one hell of an impact.

MIAspotter.



I think, therefore I don´t fly Ryanair.
User currently offlineSumma767 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 2561 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 37747 times:

Here another image.
Simply striking




Taken from:

http://www.eltiempo.com/colombia/car...e-de-avion-en-san-andres_7866340-1


User currently offline757MDE From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 1753 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 37702 times:

http://www.aviacol.net/noticias-del-...37-700-de-aires-en-san-andres.html

Yet another photo.



I gladly accept donations to pay for flight hours! This thing draws man...
User currently offlineRL757PVD From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 4674 posts, RR: 11
Reply 12, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 37543 times:

Quoting Summa767 (Reply 10):
Here another image.
Simply striking

Im at a loss for how that could actually happen

1) its such a clean break

2) it takes a lot of force (speed) to break a fuselage and yet the two pieces are so close to eachother

3) no sign of any kind of fire (and yet they still blame lightning)

Should be interesting to find out more details...



Experience is what you get when what you thought would work out didn't!
User currently offlineSCCutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5520 posts, RR: 28
Reply 13, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 37541 times:

Lightning strike is almost certainly irrelevant, except to the extent it suggests a landing continued in conditions which may not have been appropriate for landing.


...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineLHRlocal From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2008, 273 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 37488 times:

Only 1 person died in this? RIP to that person, but i find it amazing that figure is not higher looking at these photos.

 


User currently offlinefpetrutiu From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 884 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 37477 times:

Yeah, I think from the pictures we can safely say that's a complete loss of hull and a write-off...  

User currently offlinecygnuschicago From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 758 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 37445 times:

Quoting fpetrutiu (Reply 3):
Luckly only 1 fatality and 70 people were able to walk away. That says a lot about the plane. Go Boeing!

I don't think the family of the victim would agree with you, or feel "lucky". Neither will the 34 people injured and in hospital.

My condolences to the families and the injured victims.



If you cannot do the math, your opinion means squat!
User currently offlinemandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6862 posts, RR: 75
Reply 17, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 36893 times:

Quoting RL757PVD (Reply 12):
Im at a loss for how that could actually happen

Well more pics at
In particular: http://avherald.com/h?article=42fb63a9&opt=0
http://avherald.com/img/aires_b737_hk-4682_san_andres_island_100816_3.jpg
Looks like as if the aircraft just went and hit the runway at significant energy... So...

Quoting SCCutler (Reply 13):
Lightning strike is almost certainly irrelevant, except to the extent it suggests a landing continued in conditions which may not have been appropriate for landing.

The conditions were interesting looking at the METARs but I don't think it was "inappropriate" based on the limited info.
It could have simply been lightning strike just as the crew were looking out for the flare and hence botched it due to flash tempo blindness (whatever it's called)...

Mandala499



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
User currently offlinemrocktor From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 1668 posts, RR: 49
Reply 18, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 36407 times:

Quoting MIAspotter (Reply 5):
Could it been that lighting struck the aircraft and damaged the electrical systems?

It could be, but aircraft are designed to be hit by lightning with no safety effects (and planes are hit by lightning daily all over the world) so this would have to have other aggravating circumstances (design, maintenance or some other issue).

Quoting SCCutler (Reply 13):
Lightning strike is almost certainly irrelevant

While the plane should have survived any lightning strike with no ill effects, the coincidence (if there really was a lightning strike) means it has to be looked at. It could be that the only effect of the lightning strike was to distract the crew - but that could be an important part of the chain of events...


User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4490 posts, RR: 21
Reply 19, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 36070 times:

Quoting mrocktor (Reply 20):
While the plane should have survived any lightning strike with no ill effects, the coincidence (if there really was a lightning strike) means it has to be looked at. It could be that the only effect of the lightning strike was to distract the crew - but that could be an important part of the chain of events...

Or the lightning could have been indicative of other possibly adverse conditions (wind/windshear, heavy rain, hail) that are more than likely the cause of this accident  



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
User currently onlineNavigator From Sweden, joined Jul 2001, 1208 posts, RR: 14
Reply 20, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 35856 times:

Quoting SCCutler (Reply 13):
Lightning strike is almost certainly irrelevant, except to the extent it suggests a landing continued in conditions which may not have been appropriate for landing.

I agree with you completely!! My first thought is wind shear... A lightning strike would not affect an aircraft like this. It is also strange to mention any behaviour from the pilots after a crash like this. We see the result and if it is weather related the pilots should not have been there at all or they made some kind of error. I think it is a bit early to say if they did something wrong or right until we have more details on how this happened. It looks like some kind of landing accident because of wind shear or strong winds.



747-400/747-200/L1011/DC-10/DC-9/DC-8/MD-80/MD90/A340/A330/A300/A310/A321/A320/A319/767/757/737/727/HS-121/CV990/CV440/S
User currently onlinefrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3766 posts, RR: 11
Reply 21, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 35748 times:

The lightning hit was certainly not the direct reason for the crash and certainly did not break the aircraft in half like the local media seems to suggest. However, lightning means thunderstorm, and thunderstorm means windshears and possibly microbursts which might have contributed to a very hard touchdown... Who knows.


Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineB6A322 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 35660 times:

RIP to the person who perished.
 

Am I the only one who feels like this crash is remarkably similar to one that happened in Africa a few months ago. I can't recall the carrier at present, but I believe it was a Airbus A330 (Thanks, lxlgu) carrying some Tourists from the Netherlands. IIRC, the outcome was the complete opposite, with only 1 surviving, but the same, clean, flameless breakup before landing.
Has any info from that one been released?

[Edited 2010-08-16 07:28:17]


The content I post is solely my own opinion. It is not an official statement by/of/for nor representative of any company
User currently offlineSeeTheWorld From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 1325 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 35560 times:

Quoting B6A322 (Reply 24):
Am I the only one who feels like this crash is remarkably similar to one that happened in Africa a few months ago. I can't recall the carrier at present, but I believe it was a Boeing 767 carrying some Tourists from the Netherlands. IIRC, the outcome was the complete opposite, with only 1 surviving, but the same, clean, flameless breakup before landing.
Has any info from that one been released?

I'm not sure what similarities you are talking about. The Africa crash was at sunrise with no bad weather and a complete destruction of the aircraft. This was in the middle of the night during a thunderstorm. I don't think there are any similarities at all.


User currently offlinerheinwaldner From Switzerland, joined Jan 2008, 2225 posts, RR: 5
Reply 24, posted (4 years 1 month 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 36097 times:

Quoting fpetrutiu (Reply 3):
Luckly only 1 fatality and 70 people were able to walk away. That says a lot about the plane. Go Boeing!

Agreed!

I wonder whether this would be a type of accident where a shattering CFRP fuselage would claim much more casualties...

Seattle Times: 787 Unsafe In A Crash (by rgreenftm Jun 27 2010 in Civil Aviation)


25 lxlgu : Hi B6A322 The aircraft was a 332 of Afriquiyah Airways-crashed short of the runway in Tripoli on a flighr from JNB
26 B6A322 : Then I'm remembering it wrong, but there was definitely a crash somewhat recently that was remarkably similar. Maybe it was the Turkish Airlines one?
27 KC135TopBoom : Was the landing gear down? I cannot tell, but pictures of the nose section seem to suggest the nose landing gear doors are closed and that gear is ret
28 SKAirbus : Gosh, this reminds me of the Gottröra SAS crash in 1991 when ice hit the engines of the MD-80 and it had to crash land in a field, breaking up the fu
29 CFBFrame : Was not the Libya one, it was a A300 from something like Yemani Airlines landing at an island off of Eastern Africa. The plane had left Orly, stopped
30 Navigator : This crash has no similarities to that Gottröra crash at all. Gottröra happened after total loss of power at low altitude after take off. The pilot
31 okie : I am with you KC but can not tell if the gear was ripped off or never down, even looking at the wing area does not look that the MLG is extended alth
32 hotplane : All those years easyJet had it and no major problems......
33 FlyHossD : The only other 737-700 fatal crash that I can think of at the moment, was the Southwest crash at Midway. Any others?
34 F9Animal : Lightning? Highly doubt that. I am very suspicious of microburst. Looking at the debris and the way the plane is destroyed, it appears to have been a
35 A388 : That sounds plausible but than again, I'm no aircraft accident expert (yet) so I'm looking forward in reading the final report on this one. I'm also
36 rfields5421 : The Yemani aircraft did not takeoff from France. It was a flight from the Yemen capital to the Comoros Islands - but many passengers were from France
37 fsnuffer : As for the lightning, it in itself may not have had a material effect on the actual aircraft but I was on a flight approaching ORD when we got hit and
38 ER757 : Since the entire crew survived, I'd think they'd be able to provide some valuable info to the investigators. Hopefully will help determine the cause m
39 ACES320 : Back in 1991 I had the chance (if you can call it that), to land in San Andres under very bad metheorological conditions. Thunderstorms and crosswinds
40 mtnwest1979 : I'll say microburst slamming it onto the runway. If one were to stage a movie set exactly like this, most would say "it looks fake". I am amazed and s
41 Post contains links thrufru : I just received this from my airline's safety officer. It provides quite a bit more information than most of the other information posted to date. htt
42 kaitak : My thoughts exactly; the forward fuselage seems to have broken "vertically" - no stringers or fuselage sections connecting it. I've never seen that i
43 av757 : Looks like a descending downdraft microburst or windshear associated with weather caused by severe thunderstorms in the vicinity of the airport. Weath
44 Post contains links asuflyer : Colombian Media is reporting that the woman who passed away, had a heart attack, while being transferred to the hospital, not due to injuries sustaine
45 jigarciar : According to media information, the pilot informed the ATC about the lightning issue within 200 feet from the threshold of ADZ's runway 06. Which wil
46 Speedbird555 : Certainly does. Interesting aerial shot showing where the aircraft touched down & came to a rest. My immediate though is that due to the sections
47 fca767 : Why do 737's keep breaking into 3? are they not built as strong, such as the 777 that crash landed in one piece and an A320 on water
48 BD338 : Amazing that only one person was killed. No fire was probably a large contributor to the low number of fatalities.
49 readytotaxi : Appears to be little if any fire damage, hope that played a part in so many people getting out okay.
50 474218 : In the third (3rd) picture of the "avhearld" article you can see the NLG doors are missing and the wheel well appears to be empty.
51 Post contains links KC135TopBoom : Actually, a young boy was killed when the WN B-73G crashed through the MDW airport concrete fence and onto street traffic. IIRC, this was WN's first
52 Maverick623 : You guys need to calm down a bit. Of course the family of the person that died is going to feel somewhat differently than most of us, but I'm sure ev
53 MSPNWA : Sad to hear there was a fatality, but at the same time thankfully no one else was killed. I keep looking at the pictures in amazement that all but one
54 type-rated : I'm really surprised by the amount of damage to the a/c that they only had one fatality. That's amazing. Those were some pretty lucky people. I agree
55 Post contains links Summa767 : In this picture you can see what looks like the snapped off nose landing gear: http://www.caracol.com.co/images//11991_g_4_imgg.jpg Given the surroun
56 Post contains images parton87 : No one knows the cause of the crash so I think he meant the look of the accident-site and the damage to the aircraft Look a little bit similar, I thi
57 A388 : In accidents such as this (impact with the ground) the fuselage always breaks up this way, due to the fuselage sections being joined to each other th
58 SEPilot : Any aircraft will break up if it hits hard enough. The 777 was just barely a crash; it almost made the runway. While the vertical velocity was probab
59 jigarciar : Actually, this is a picture of one of the main landing gears. According to what has been said by Aerocivil (Colombian CAA) in the news, the aircraft
60 Post contains links and images RICARIZA : This image explains a lot:
61 7673mech : Airframes are designed to break like this.
62 USAir330 : Amazing that more weren't killed. My condolences to the family of the one that was. Just speculating but looks like windshear could have been a factor
63 Summa767 : That image has already been modified since it was originally posted, as Avherald had the touchdown originally in runway 24. Now they have the wreckag
64 jigarciar : In addition, engines have been found together with the main landing gears, before the threshold of runway 06.
65 93Sierra : Thats because 737 have a break-away seem in 3 places along the fuselage that breaks upon impact allowing passengers the opportunity to jump free and
66 Post contains images okie : If you go by what the Avherald has and the locations they listed then the fuse is practically a mile from the nose gear. Not buying that one. If you
67 trigged : I see the FA's had the well-developed instinct and training to deploy the forward slide, assuming they did and not the rescue/fire personnel. Probably
68 kimberlyrj : Hey hey An aircraft hitting the water is never smooth, however the stresses on the fuselage are quite different to that of an aircraft slamming into a
69 Post contains links ferengi80 : I'd be inclined to agree. Looking at the way the airframe has broken apart, it reminds me so much of the crash of British Midland flight 92, on Jan 8
70 Aesma : Even if they lost all instruments it would not explain this crash. The controls are hydraulically operated so lighting wouldn't render the A/C more d
71 bikerthai : Yes, I think the FA would need to take the extra step of dis-engaging the girt bar if they want to open the door without deploying the slide. bikerth
72 trigged : That was sort of the point I was making. Instead of just running out of the end of the aircraft, the FA instincts kicked in and he/she opened the doo
73 Aesma : There is at least an FA seated at that door so it does not seem logical for him/her to go for the hole.
74 Post contains links Viscount724 : It was an A310-300. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20090630-0
75 A388 : You qouted my post and yes I know a landing on water isn't smooth but I think we can all agree that the US A320 landing was perfectly executed with l
76 Bogota : The crew did a fantastic job, there were small fires that the crew were able to identify and prevented them to open 1R and 2L. Regardless the 4 girls
77 KC135TopBoom : Judging fro the size of the man in that pucture, that is one of the MLG. The NLG wheels on a B-737 are much smaller. DL-191 did not hit the ground in
78 Post contains links 474218 : No change in the riveting. Hot bonded doublers were added to the lap joints, along with replacing a cold bond adhesive with corrosion inhibiting seal
79 flybynight : Most definitely. Probably saved most of the lives in fact. Similar to the Turkish 737 a couple of years. Hats of to Boeing.
80 spacecadet : Looks like microburst/windshear to me. Thunderstorms in the area, plane hits hard short of the runway. It's the most likely explanation. Good thing th
81 RCS763AV : What was the tail number on this bird? Is it ex-Easyjet or ex-Aeroméxico? RIP to the passenger who passed away.
82 Navigator : Eastern lost a 727 on final to runway 22L at JFK many years ago because of wind shear. Since then this has happened many times for instance in DFW wit
83 757MDE : HK-4682 ex EasyJet.
84 EBGflyer : Reminds me of the One-Two-GO flight 269 that crashed in Phuket back in 2007 due to windshear. Obviously pilots shouldn't be landing in such weather c
85 MarkHKG : I think this is an incredible testament to the seats and floor attachments as well. I am fairly sure this aircraft was equipped with 16G seats to com
86 SeeTheWorld : This would be very interesting to find out. I was thinking about how hard this plane must have hit the ground and realizing how remarkable it was tha
87 Woof : ...and would go to show how serious a fraud Koito Industries committed in falsifying their test data. It would be somehow ironic if the seats in this
88 rfields5421 : Neither comparison is valid due to the much lower stress levels and G-loads. Any large aircraft will initially break into three pieces if it hits har
89 Post contains images fca767 : All True points I understand now I didn't realise also that they are designed to break in 3 I don't know any of the background...What does this mean
90 WNwatcher : Technically, the one fatality was due to a heart attack en route to the hospital, she had minor injuries, but the stress must have gotten to her. R.I.
91 affirmative : IIRC all hospitalization and or fatalities up to 48 hours after the crash will be counted as due to the crash according to FAR (NTSB 830 IIRC) in the
92 Woof : Neither just yet. I was trying to tie the comments about seat certification with Koito's fabrication of the very same. If 16G seats are shown to have
93 777jaah : I thought of that too, but maybe at such low altitude, pilot reported the lightning strike at 80 m AGL there wasn't much time to react. Probably 200
94 WNwatcher : Just speculation, but could a lightning strike knock out the wind-shear protection system?
95 Post contains images fca767 : ah I see thanks I'm not clued up on seats but it's an interesting point if a certain design of them has saved lives.
96 Post contains links Summa767 : Here is a link to a very interesting video obtained by colombian tv Caracol: http://www.caracoltv.com/noticias/na...cion-el-accidente-aereo-san-andres
97 Post contains images affirmative : I read 80 meters from the threshold, which would mean a bit lower then 80m.. But no matter what, with a stable approach you should have engines spool
98 affirmative : I would love an english translation of that video.. If I'm not mistaking you don't "cut" (retard) the engines until about 5-10ft above ground, so why
99 Maverick623 : 30 days, actually.
100 777jaah : He said he "cut" power when they called landing....he repeteadly said they were landing, and not like the whole proceedure, but more like wheels down
101 Il75 : In the video by Caracol the copilot simply says that they were almost touching down when the airplane sank rapidly. They couldn't level it, they could
102 affirmative : Thank you for the interpretation. Still seems strange that he called to "cut" the power just after he called the landing decision. On a VOR/DME appro
103 eisenbach : After reading the comments of the pilot and looking at the weather situation it sounds to me (as a meteorologist) like a classical windshear accident
104 Post contains links RCS763AV : It seems that the woman who lost her life in the crash did not die of a heart attack: http://www.eltiempo.com/colombia/occ...abria-muerto-por-infarto_
105 comorin : You can't have a downburst that low because the airflow would deflect parallel to the ground, resulting in a headwind followed by a tailwind. If the
106 MarkHKG : This is not unexpected in a rapid deceleration accident. It happens to people in high speed car accidents as well and as you can imagine, is not surv
107 eisenbach : @ comorin: yes, you are right. For sure the downburst is not going INTO the ground, but you can have the downward component really near the ground as
108 ltbewr : I also wonder about visability with the combo of a middle of the night landing in heavy rain/thunderstorms and at an airport that may not have the mos
109 tdscanuck : Aircraft designers spend a *lot* of effort into minimizing fuel leakage and fire in the event of a crash. Unless you tear open the wing box (and a lo
110 comorin : Thanks for the explanation, especially about the returning air flow. Interestingly, the pilot is quoted as saying 'The Forces of Nature' were too str
111 okie : With all due respect, if all landings and take-offs were to be stopped when rainstorms were near an airport the air transportation system would come
112 comorin : Appreciate your comments. It just seems there's a crash every month now, while we used to have years when there were no major transport aircraft faci
113 Post contains links and images PlymSpotter : This accident reminds me in some ways of the Britannia 757 at GRO back in 1999, not just that the only fatality was a survivor who had a heart attack.
114 Summa767 : This seems unlikey. In the video (poted above) of the immediate aftermath the first officer who was the pilot flying, talks of "hundimiento", so they
115 XT6Wagon : Headwind that turns into a tailwind is very deadly. Say you are cruising 20mph above stall into a 20mph headwind. It suddenly reverses and now is a 2
116 Kaiarahi : Airspeed is what generates lift - groundspeed has nothing to do with it.
117 XT6Wagon : Groundspeed is what your momentum is. Airspeed is lift. Airspeed can rapidly change without changing your momentum. Which is why headwind to tailwind
118 Post contains links affirmative : Actually, I checked it out because I had the same notion as you, it can. In the maturing stages a cell pushes the air down and before it hits the gro
119 Post contains links spacecadet : What years were those? I don't remember them. Also, the big difference now is that we get news from around the world instantly. 20 years ago, you mig
120 WNwatcher : I thought that the 737s were equipped with Microburst warning systems.........
121 spacecadet : Woops, somehow my link is getting caught in some sort of "anger filter" or something here... oh well, my reply 119 was supposed to have a link in it,
122 tdscanuck : The OEM's, all combined, are cranking out over 1000 aircraft per year. Not nearly that many retire. Thus, if the accident rate per flight hour stays
123 comorin : Thanks. It just seemed that we would hear of certain years where there were no fatal crashes. Spacecadet, my comments are purely subjective. I agree
124 Post contains links Summa767 : Another video has emerged of the immediate aftermath: At least one fire was being put out by the fire brigade. http://www.canalrcnmsn.com/content/p...
125 Summa767 : Second death as a result of Aires 737 crash Maria Camila Angarita, an 11 year old girl who had been in a critical condition, has died. This brings to
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