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DTW NW 255 8-16-87  
User currently offlineisitsafenow From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4984 posts, RR: 23
Posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4854 times:

Today was the day NW lost an MD-80 at DTW.
One survivor.
safe


If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMNMncrcnwjr From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4789 times:

I was on that bird the day before in an exit window seat .... no strange noises, slats and flaps all seemed to function properly, it was a very smooth and quiet flight. At the time I was amazed at the lower interior noise level of the DC9 Super 80 than that of the -50s as well as how quiet the Super 80 was as well.. NW255 was a tragedy....


CV340/580DC3DC9super80MD88/90DC10717273747576777A319/20CRJ2/7/9F27AVROJET31CITAT5/7/XSAAB340YS11Dash8E135/45/75
User currently offlineMadDogJT8D From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 398 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4734 times:

Please correct me if I am wrong, I don't believe there was a "problem" with the flaps/slats on NW255. I believe this was determined to be crew error and they did not select the appropriate flap setting for takeoff.

It really was a tragedy - such an avoidable accident...


User currently offlineKarlB737 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3105 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4652 times:

Quoting MadDogJT8D (Reply 2):
I believe this was determined to be crew error and they did not select the appropriate flap setting for takeoff.

Thats the way I remember it as well.


User currently offlineexFWAOONW From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 405 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4497 times:

They selected the correct flap setting for t/o, but had pulled the breaker earlier for the slats and forgot to reset it, so the leading edge slats did not deploy and the takeoff configuration warning alarm did not go off (it was on the same breaker IIRC).

It was eerie when the company radio fell silent that night.



Is just me, or is flying not as much fun anymore?
User currently offlinen7371f From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1734 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4453 times:
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Quoting exFWAOONW (Reply 4):
They selected the correct flap setting for t/o, but had pulled the breaker earlier for the slats and forgot to reset it, so the leading edge slats did not deploy and the takeoff configuration warning alarm did not go off (it was on the same breaker IIRC).

It was eerie when the company radio fell silent that night.

...I don't believe so. Within a few days of the crash investigators noted the flaps were not set for takeoff. And the CVR also revealed no mention of calling for flaps or confirming flap configuration before depature.

Yes, the circuit breaker had been pulled. This breaker would have sounded an alarm to the pilots on their take-off roll that the aircraft was not configured (no flaps) for departure.

Still...the final report revealed, I'm nearly certain, that the captain might have saved the aircraft by lowering the nose at the first sound of the terrain alarm instead of pulling up the nose further.

What a inexplicable disaster. And for years in certain circles within Northwest, it permeated the division between NW legacy pilots and RC pilots (who had many issues they disliked each other on). The MD-80 crew was a RC crew.


User currently offlineexFWAOONW From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 405 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4403 times:

From the NTSB website executive summary:

"The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the flightcrew's failure to use the taxi checklist to ensure that the flaps and slats were extended for takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the flightcrew that the airplane was not configured properly for takeoff. The reason for the absence of electrical power could not be determined."

Wasn't there a practice of deploying the l/e slats in-flight and pulling the breaker to keep them deployed to save fuel?



Is just me, or is flying not as much fun anymore?
User currently offlinestratosphere From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1653 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4362 times:

Quoting exFWAOONW (Reply 6):
Wasn't there a practice of deploying the l/e slats in-flight and pulling the breaker to keep them deployed to save fuel?

I think you are confusing this accident with the TWA 727 incident over Minneapolis in 1979 which went into a dive but recovered at around 5000 ft. It was a theory that the crew was manipulating the flaps in order to save fuel. It was never proven as the CVR was erased after landing which further added speculation that the crew did something wrong. The NW 255 accident circuit braker that was alleged to have been pulled was a takeoff warning horn. In the MD-80 and other series a/c if you taxi with the flaps up and push the throttles any measurable length a horn will sound reminding you "hey dummy drop the flaps" It was a theory that they did this. But the only way I know to drop only the flaps and not slats on a DC-9/MD-80 is on the flap handle there is a knob that you can turn and you can split the flap handle in half left side slats right side flaps. There would be absolutely NO reason to do this especially on a takeoff roll. The conclusion the NTSB came too was a busy night DTW being busy they pulled the c/b for the warning horn did not use the checklist and forgot to set flaps/slats for T/O. Being hot and humid and a full load made it less than optimal conditions for flight add to that no flaps/slats better have some good speed going. Actually if they hadn't hit the light pole in the Avis parking lot it was theorized they might have made it.



NWA THE TRUE EVIL EMPIRE
User currently offlineFlyNWA727 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 305 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4334 times:

Quoting MNMncrcnwjr (Reply 1):
I was on that bird the day before in an exit window seat .... no strange noises, slats and flaps all seemed to function properly, it was a very smooth and quiet flight.

Not sure where you were getting at with this statement. The cause of the Flight 255 crash had nothing to do with mechanical failure ... the pilots simply forgot to set the appropriate takeoff flaps/slats and the plane stalled on liftoff and the rest is history.

Quoting exFWAOONW (Reply 4):
They selected the correct flap setting for t/o, but had pulled the breaker earlier for the slats and forgot to reset it, so the leading edge slats did not deploy and the takeoff configuration warning alarm did not go off (it was on the same breaker IIRC).

This isn't correct at all. As I mentioned, none of the takeoff flaps/slats were set prior to takeoff. The pilots were in a rush to takeoff due to deteriorating weather conditions and because they were trying to beat the noise abatement curfew in effect John Wayne - Orange County Airport. At the last minute, the control tower instructed Flight 255 to change runways and the crew got lost trying to figure out how to locate the new runway. In all of the confusion of trying to find the new runway, the pilots skipped over an entire section of the pre-flight checklist, and that section just happened to be the checklists for flaps and slats. The breaker had been pulled due to the pilots using a single-engine taxi maneuver, and as a result, the alarm would sound indicating the aircraft wasn't in proper takeoff configuration. To combat that, a lot of pilots did something that is against the rules, and they pulled the breaker so the alarm wouldn't constantly sound. Anyway, that is the gist of it. You really should watch the Air Crash Investigation story of NW255. It was very comprehensive and accurate.

Air Crash Investigation - Northwest 255 - Part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utrS-AnqZ4U

Air Crash Investigation - Northwest 255 - Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tD5A1Xtfn20

Air Crash Investigation - Northwest 255 - Part 3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcVyNx_XQf0

Air Crash Investigation - Northwest 255 - Part 4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9USJFSyydL8

Air Crash Investigation - Northwest 255 - Part 5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbEC_PDVTLs



First flight aboard a Northwest B727-251ADV out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, my hometown airport.
User currently offlineTVNWZ From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 2389 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 4262 times:

Quoting FlyNWA727 (Reply 8):
The pilots were in a rush to takeoff due to deteriorating weather conditions and because they were trying to beat the noise abatement curfew in effect John Wayne - Orange County Airport.

The plane was headed to PHX. Was it continuing on to SNA from PHX? They had a lot of time to figure that out on the way to PHX.


User currently offlineisitsafenow From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4984 posts, RR: 23
Reply 10, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 4211 times:

Quoting stratosphere (Reply 7):
I think you are confusing this accident with the TWA 727 incident over Minneapolis in 1979 which went into a dive but recovered


JFK-MSP flight was a 727-100. The barrel roll was over MBS or Auburn Michigan. Part of an inboard leading edge slat was found in a farm field a few days after the incident.

For the above post...routing was MBS-DTW-PHX-SNA. Due to delay at DTW, it was almost certain the flight would not make SNA because of a late curfew there. The voice recorder had a bit where the crew mentioned"not gonna make the Orange tonight" as they sat at the gate at DTW.
safe

[Edited 2010-08-16 17:48:24]


If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25338 posts, RR: 22
Reply 11, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4185 times:

Quoting MadDogJT8D (Reply 2):
Please correct me if I am wrong, I don't believe there was a "problem" with the flaps/slats on NW255. I believe this was determined to be crew error and they did not select the appropriate flap setting for takeoff.

It really was a tragedy - such an avoidable accident...

Unfortunately, an almost identical accident occurred to a Spanair MD-82 21 years later, when it took off from MAD with flaps retracted, stalled and crashed. In a strange coincidence, the number of fatalities (6 crew and 148 passengers) was identical to the NW accident, although there were 16 survivors on the Spanair flight. That crash was 2 years ago this Friday.
http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20080820-0


User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2825 posts, RR: 45
Reply 12, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4137 times:

Quoting MadDogJT8D (Reply 2):
Please correct me if I am wrong, I don't believe there was a "problem" with the flaps/slats on NW255. I believe this was determined to be crew error and they did not select the appropriate flap setting for takeoff.

You are correct. Contributing to the accident was a failure of the takeoff warning system due to lack of electrical power. Whether the CB for the system had been intentionally pulled is a matter of some speculation.

Quoting exFWAOONW (Reply 4):
They selected the correct flap setting for t/o, but had pulled the breaker earlier for the slats and forgot to reset it, so the leading edge slats did not deploy and the takeoff configuration warning alarm did not go off (it was on the same breaker IIRC).

The airplane does not physically work that way. The slats on an MD-80 go to the mid-sealed position (normal for takeoff) without requiring electrical power of any kind; neither do the flaps require any electrical power to work correctly. The flaps and slats were not correctly set because nobody ever moved the handle.

Quoting n7371f (Reply 5):
Quoting exFWAOONW (Reply 4):
They selected the correct flap setting for t/o, but had pulled the breaker earlier for the slats and forgot to reset it, so the leading edge slats did not deploy and the takeoff configuration warning alarm did not go off (it was on the same breaker IIRC).

It was eerie when the company radio fell silent that night.

...I don't believe so. Within a few days of the crash investigators noted the flaps were not set for takeoff. And the CVR also revealed no mention of calling for flaps or confirming flap configuration before depature.

Yes, the circuit breaker had been pulled. This breaker would have sounded an alarm to the pilots on their take-off roll that the aircraft was not configured (no flaps) for departure.

The CVR quickly revealed that flaps/slats had never been called for or actuated, which agreed with what the wreckage revealed.

Quoting exFWAOONW (Reply 6):
Wasn't there a practice of deploying the l/e slats in-flight and pulling the breaker to keep them deployed to save fuel?

No, though there may have been an unauthorized practice of pulling the CB powering the TO warning system to prevent nuisance alerts when taxiing primarily into the gate with a clean wing. If this was the case the accident crew likely did not notice the CB was out when they did their cockpit setup. This is all conjecture, though it does seem certain the system was unpowered at the time of the accident.

Quoting stratosphere (Reply 7):
The NW 255 accident circuit braker that was alleged to have been pulled was a takeoff warning horn. In the MD-80 and other series a/c if you taxi with the flaps up and push the throttles any measurable length a horn will sound reminding you "hey dummy drop the flaps" It was a theory that they did this. But the only way I know to drop only the flaps and not slats on a DC-9/MD-80 is on the flap handle there is a knob that you can turn and you can split the flap handle in half left side slats right side flaps. There would be absolutely NO reason to do this especially on a takeoff roll. The conclusion the NTSB came too was a busy night DTW being busy they pulled the c/b for the warning horn did not use the checklist and forgot to set flaps/slats for T/O.

That is a very good primer on the subject; thanks stratosphere. BTW, what you say about the "knurled knob" and splitting the flap/slat handle works on DC-9's, but the MD-80 handle was redesigned (and is in my experience more cumbersome to use) in a way that takes that ability away from the crew. In an MD-80 if you get flaps with no slats, something is broken. (Big time.) Having said that, you points are all well taken; even if that ability had been present, the crew would certainly not have had any reason to use it. Thanks for your post.

Quoting FlyNWA727 (Reply 8):
Quoting MNMncrcnwjr (Reply 1):
I was on that bird the day before in an exit window seat .... no strange noises, slats and flaps all seemed to function properly, it was a very smooth and quiet flight.

Not sure where you were getting at with this statement. The cause of the Flight 255 crash had nothing to do with mechanical failure ... the pilots simply forgot to set the appropriate takeoff flaps/slats and the plane stalled on liftoff and the rest is history.

Correct. It would likely have been prevented if the TO warning had functioned. This is a classic accident with multiple unlikely links in the chain. By the way, many (if not all) operators now check the TO warning prior to every flight on MD-80 series aircraft today.

Quoting FlyNWA727 (Reply 8):
The breaker had been pulled due to the pilots using a single-engine taxi maneuver, and as a result, the alarm would sound indicating the aircraft wasn't in proper takeoff configuration. To combat that, a lot of pilots did something that is against the rules, and they pulled the breaker so the alarm wouldn't constantly sound.

I know that it is theorized they (or the previous crew) pulled the CB, and it is certain the system was unpowered, but has it been proven the CB was intentionally pulled? I'm not being argumentative here, but I believe that is speculation.


User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2825 posts, RR: 45
Reply 13, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4115 times:

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 11):
Quoting MadDogJT8D (Reply 2):
Please correct me if I am wrong, I don't believe there was a "problem" with the flaps/slats on NW255. I believe this was determined to be crew error and they did not select the appropriate flap setting for takeoff.

It really was a tragedy - such an avoidable accident...

Unfortunately, an almost identical accident occurred to a Spanair MD-82 21 years later, when it took off from MAD with flaps retracted, stalled and crashed. In a strange coincidence, the number of fatalities (6 crew and 148 passengers) was identical to the NW accident, although there were 16 survivors on the Spanair flight. That crash was 2 years ago this Friday.
http://aviation-safety.net/database/...820-0

Viscount: Thank you for mentioning this. I meant to and forgot to bring it up. It is wholly relevant here: flap setting is crucial for takeoff.

Quoting PGNCS (Reply 12):
Quoting FlyNWA727 (Reply 8):
Quoting MNMncrcnwjr (Reply 1):
I was on that bird the day before in an exit window seat .... no strange noises, slats and flaps all seemed to function properly, it was a very smooth and quiet flight.

Not sure where you were getting at with this statement. The cause of the Flight 255 crash had nothing to do with mechanical failure ... the pilots simply forgot to set the appropriate takeoff flaps/slats and the plane stalled on liftoff and the rest is history.

Correct. It would likely have been prevented if the TO warning had functioned. This is a classic accident with multiple unlikely links in the chain. By the way, many (if not all) operators now check the TO warning prior to every flight on MD-80 series aircraft today.

I should have also been more clear, referencing what Viscount brought up: most (if not all) US-based carriers test the TO Warning in MD-80 series aircraft prior to each flight; I can't really address practices outside the US (although I consider it a very sound policy,) as I have not done any contract instruction on the MD-80 for overseas customers for many years now. If we don't learn the lessons of the past, we keep re-learning them, unfortunately.


User currently offlineFlyNWA727 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 305 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4109 times:

Quoting PGNCS (Reply 12):
I know that it is theorized they (or the previous crew) pulled the CB, and it is certain the system was unpowered, but has it been proven the CB was intentionally pulled? I'm not being argumentative here, but I believe that is speculation.


There is no speculation at all. I posted a detailed explanation of why pilots practiced pulling the CB, and I posted five links to an entire episode of "Air Crash Investigation" that featured the crash of NW255. It was stated in the program — on numerous occasions — that the NTSB found out that the pilots of NW255 did, in fact, pull the CB, after an extensive investigation, which included talking to other pilots who admitted that they have CB in the past. You should look at the ACI episode when you have some free time.

[Edited 2010-08-16 18:12:50]


First flight aboard a Northwest B727-251ADV out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, my hometown airport.
User currently offlineFlyNWA727 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 305 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4079 times:

Quoting TVNWZ (Reply 9):
The plane was headed to PHX. Was it continuing on to SNA from PHX? They had a lot of time to figure that out on the way to PHX.

NW255 was a four-leg flight from Tri City/MSB International Airport to John Wayne Airport via Detroit and Phoenix.



First flight aboard a Northwest B727-251ADV out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, my hometown airport.
User currently offlinejlbmedia From United States of America, joined Jun 2002, 622 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4046 times:

Does anyone know how the one survivior (a Baby I think) Is dowing some 26 years latter?


JLB54061
User currently offlinetwinotter From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 201 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days ago) and read 4019 times:

Quoting FlyNWA727 (Reply 14):
There is no speculation at all. . . . It was stated in the program — on numerous occasions — that the NTSB found out that the pilots of NW255 did, in fact, pull the CB . . .

"The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the flightcrew's failure to use the taxi checklist to ensure the flaps and slats were extended for takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the absence of electrical power to the airplane takeoff warning system which thus did not warn the flightcrew that the airplane was not configured properly for takeoff. The reason for the absence of electrical power could not be determined."

Did the pilot pull the circuit breaker? Probably. Is that speculation. Definitely!


User currently offlineFlyNWA727 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 305 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days ago) and read 3981 times:

Quoting twinotter (Reply 17):

"The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the flightcrew's failure to use the taxi checklist to ensure the flaps and slats were extended for takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the absence of electrical power to the airplane takeoff warning system which thus did not warn the flightcrew that the airplane was not configured properly for takeoff. The reason for the absence of electrical power could not be determined."

Did the pilot pull the circuit breaker? Probably. Is that speculation. Definitely!

You can post that until you crash the site. I'm not sure if some of you all are choosing to be really dense or you can't understand plain English. Again, for the third or fourth time, I have posted VIDEO evidence supporting my claims. I am not speculating or posting personal beliefs. If you all are questioning the validity of an international program like "Air Crash Investigation" and are saying that their facts are flawed, then take that up with the creators of the program. Reiterating for the third or fourth time, in ACIs feature on NW255, there was an entire section of that hour long program, devoted to how it was determined that the pilots pulled the CB that actuated the warming sounds on the MD-80. I refuse to say this again.



First flight aboard a Northwest B727-251ADV out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, my hometown airport.
User currently offlinetwinotter From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 201 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (4 years 1 month 5 days ago) and read 3951 times:

Quoting FlyNWA727 (Reply 18):
You can post that until you crash the site. I'm not sure if some of you all are choosing to be really dense or you can't understand plain English. Again, for the third or fourth time, I have posted VIDEO evidence supporting my claims. I am not speculating . . .

At 7:32 in the "Part 4" video you posted, the plain English commentary is:

"Investigators suspect that the crew of flight 255 tripped the breaker to avoid the irritating takeoff warning."

A pulled breaker would be one reason for the lack of power the NTSB investigation discovered. That is the speculation.


User currently offlineacidradio From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1874 posts, RR: 10
Reply 20, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3870 times:
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Quoting jlbmedia (Reply 16):
Does anyone know how the one survivior (a Baby I think) Is dowing some 26 years latter?

She was 4 yrs old at the time so that would make her about 25 yrs old now. From what I read she was taken in by family members in the BHM area. I somewhere read that she went on to successfully graduate from the University of Alabama with a BA in Psychology. I won't go on because she deserves privacy. No human being deserves to go through that let alone a young girl. If you Google NW255 I'm sure you can find plenty about her. Wherever she is I hope she is doing well and I get the feeling that us and this humongous community of airplane people would do our best to help her in any way we could.

As a kid this was the first airplane crash that really hit home. I'm from MSP. Growing up lots of people in my community worked for NW doing everything. Pilots, F/A's, mechanics, gate agents, ramp agents, managers, IT people, lots of kids I knew growing up had parents who worked for NW. When you hear about something like this happening at NW this was something that happened to the home team. We needed to know that everyone was OK. Unfortunately a lot of people weren't.



Ich haben zwei Platzspielen und ein Microphone
User currently offlinen7371f From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1734 posts, RR: 11
Reply 21, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3870 times:
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Quoting FlyNWA727 (Reply 18):
there was an entire section of that hour long program, devoted to how it was determined that the pilots pulled the CB that actuated the warming sounds on the MD-80. I refuse to say this again.

...and didn't the report (the NTSB one) mention a history of the crew (the captain I believe) not adhering to strict cockpit procedures? I do know it was reported that the pulling of that certain circuit breaker was common among MD-80 crews. In fact I recall the design of the breaker (the incessive alarm sounding during one engine taxi-outs) was one of the lame attempts of ALPA at the time in attempting to defend the pilots in the final report.


User currently offlineF9Animal From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 5053 posts, RR: 28
Reply 22, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3833 times:

Quoting acidradio (Reply 20):
She was 4 yrs old at the time so that would make her about 25 yrs old now. From what I read she was taken in by family members in the BHM area. I somewhere read that she went on to successfully graduate from the University of Alabama with a BA in Psychology. I won't go on because she deserves privacy. No human being deserves to go through that let alone a young girl. If you Google NW255 I'm sure you can find plenty about her. Wherever she is I hope she is doing well and I get the feeling that us and this humongous community of airplane people would do our best to help her in any way we could.

She also does not remember anything about that day. She said she might come out one day, and share her story. I would love to just see her all grown up. I think she should write a book or do an Oprah show.

NW 255 changed my life. It was a crash that I will never forget.



I Am A Different Animal!!
User currently offlineFlyNWA727 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 305 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3831 times:

Quoting twinotter (Reply 19):
At 7:32 in the "Part 4" video you posted, the plain English commentary is:

"Investigators suspect that the crew of flight 255 tripped the breaker to avoid the irritating takeoff warning."

A pulled breaker would be one reason for the lack of power the NTSB investigation discovered. That is the speculation.

You're absolutely correct with that. It has been a while since I've seen that program so I forgot those minute, yet, very important small details. At the end of the day, neither one of us were proven right or wrong. What we do know, is that someone did indeed pull that circuit breaker. Whether or not it was the flightcrew of flight 255, will never be known, but as the investigator said, odds are the flightcrew of NW255, did indeed pull the breaker.

Quoting n7371f (Reply 21):
...and didn't the report (the NTSB one) mention a history of the crew (the captain I believe) not adhering to strict cockpit procedures? I do know it was reported that the pulling of that certain circuit breaker was common among MD-80 crews. In fact I recall the design of the breaker (the incessive alarm sounding during one engine taxi-outs) was one of the lame attempts of ALPA at the time in attempting to defend the pilots in the final report.

I'd be lying to you if I told you I knew. I have never read the full NTSB report on the accident, what I do know is based on books, publications, and video I've seen. I wouldn't be surprised if what you state is true. Even the investigator in the documentary I posted, strongly suspects the pilot of NW255, did pull that switch. And he said that was based on actual investigation.



First flight aboard a Northwest B727-251ADV out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, my hometown airport.
User currently offlineacidradio From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1874 posts, RR: 10
Reply 24, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3807 times:
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Quoting F9Animal (Reply 22):
She also does not remember anything about that day. She said she might come out one day, and share her story. I would love to just see her all grown up. I think she should write a book or do an Oprah show.

If and when she does I will be excited to see what she says as will we all. If and when she is ready. And if it isn't the right thing I hope that nobody ever finds her or intrudes on her. I can't imagine something as tremendous as being the sole survivor of a major airplane crash. She lost her entire family around her. She deserves all the privacy she can afford. For her sake I hope that whatever she is doing is going well.



Ich haben zwei Platzspielen und ein Microphone
25 F9Animal : She was our baby after that crash. The world took her in their arms. She will come out one of these days, I hope. It would be very interesting to hea
26 isitsafenow : That would be a three legger 1.MBS-DTW 2.DTW-PHX 3.PHX-SNA. safe
27 WA707atMSP : A couple of years ago, I read that she is on Facebook, but has her privacy settings configured so that nobody can find her. Apparently, she has remai
28 n7371f : I got a hold of the NTSB report... I did not know this, but it makes sense now having just gone through the NW/DL merger, but the flight was actually
29 Post contains links PGNCS : It is speculation. Please read the NTSB report. I have, several times. The NTSB always trumps television journalism in a credibility battle. If you d
30 freakyrat : Two years previous to this accident (First week of August 1985) Capt. John Maus who was the pilot of NWA255 flew me to Chicago O'Hare from Houston Hob
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DL / NW Fleet Updates 10/16/09 posted Fri Oct 16 2009 10:08:13 by PSU.DTW.SCE
DL/NW LHR-DTW-LHR = 767-400? posted Thu Sep 24 2009 06:44:36 by BHXDTW
DL/NW Upgrades CMI-DTW To CRJ posted Tue Sep 8 2009 11:58:51 by IlliniCMI
Any NW Airlink Emb 170-175 Flying Into DTW? posted Sat Jul 18 2009 13:55:09 by 727LOVER
Delta (NW) 2371 DTW-OMA Delay.... posted Mon Jun 15 2009 08:46:34 by Rj777
OAG Changes 10/16/09: AA/CO/DL/FL/NW/UA/WN/ZK posted Fri Oct 16 2009 18:34:07 by Enilria
DL / NW Fleet Updates 10/16/09 posted Fri Oct 16 2009 10:08:13 by PSU.DTW.SCE
DL/NW LHR-DTW-LHR = 767-400? posted Thu Sep 24 2009 06:44:36 by BHXDTW
DL/NW Upgrades CMI-DTW To CRJ posted Tue Sep 8 2009 11:58:51 by IlliniCMI
Any NW Airlink Emb 170-175 Flying Into DTW? posted Sat Jul 18 2009 13:55:09 by 727LOVER