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Should Boeing Buyout Alenia 787 Operations?  
User currently offlineNYC777 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 5802 posts, RR: 47
Posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3155 times:

Given the issues that Alenia seems to have assembling 787 parts the time has come to ask if Boeing should ddo with Alenia what it has already done with Vought and Global Aeronautica. But out Alenia and move the manufacture of these parts back under Boeing's unbrella? I think it should be yes but there is a cost factor involved.

Also read on:

http://www.fleetbuzzeditorial.com/2010/08/18/boeing-787-production/

Here's an excerpt:

The build quality of the horizontal stabilisers, aft and central sections of the 787 produced by Alenia have continued to be the weak link in the production set up and are under almost constant scrutiny as Boeing looks to improve quality. Boeing must bring this work back in house to ensure stability and progress to the 787 program.

[Edited 2010-08-18 07:19:52]

[Edited 2010-08-18 07:20:01]


That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 7097 posts, RR: 46
Reply 1, posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3038 times:

Ultimately I think Boeing would be smart to bring as much of the critical work under its own roof as possible. It certainly seems that Alenia has contributed more than its share of problems, and I would think that if Boeing can afford it they should do it.


The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlinekanban From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 3844 posts, RR: 27
Reply 2, posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2970 times:
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The main issue to bringing the work back in house is where... Boeing would first have to build a facility. that takes time. Although the stabilizers could go to Fredrickson site, there again is a need for building expansion. Would the Japanese take over the contracts (it's an option) however again they are filling their facilities as the rate increases.

The other option is to buy the existing plant, however putting in 100% new top to bottom personnel is both risky and time consuming as they are trained.. not to mention the Italian labor unions resistance.

A better option is to move in a 50 person management team to assist improvements and oversee QA.


User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2606 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2902 times:

On the one hand, it goes against the whole concept that the 7E7 program was based upon.
On the other, Boeing has already said the next new airplane model, whatever it would be, would have much less outsourcing. So maybe they bite the bullet here and bring Alenia under their ownership like they did with Vought.


User currently offlinecosmofly From United States of America, joined May 2009, 649 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2875 times:

Boeing needs to increase capacity anyway. While helping Alenia, a new plan can be built in parallel in the US so eventually Boeing can have in-house capabilities for all key components even if something goes wrong far away.

User currently offlineLumberton From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 4708 posts, RR: 20
Reply 5, posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2644 times:

Quoting SEPilot (Reply 1):
Ultimately I think Boeing would be smart to bring as much of the critical work under its own roof as possible.

I think the keyword is "ultimately" as in sometime between delivery of the 789 and launch of the 737 successor. I don't think now would be a good idea--not with everything else Boeing has on its plate.



"When all is said and done, more will be said than done".
User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 7097 posts, RR: 46
Reply 6, posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2530 times:

Quoting Lumberton (Reply 5):

I think the keyword is "ultimately" as in sometime between delivery of the 789 and launch of the 737 successor. I don't think now would be a good idea--not with everything else Boeing has on its plate.

You are probably right; I do not have any first hand knowledge of how much Boeing could manage at this point, which is why I was vague on the timeline.



The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlinetrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4869 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (4 years 4 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2343 times:
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I would think the Italian government would have a say given they gave what about half a billion euros to Alenia for the 787 project.

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