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Henan Suspends Flying; Fires GM  
User currently offlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3382 posts, RR: 2
Posted (3 years 11 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2505 times:

Henan Airlines yesterday suspended all flights in response to Tuesday's crash of an Embraer 190 that killed 42 and injured 54 at Yichun airport, which was closed yesterday. The death toll was revised down from 43. CAAC Minister Li Jiayang said Henen's remaining four E-190s would remain grounded pending safety inspections. This was China's first fatal airline accident in more than six years. The last involved a China Eastern Airlines Bombardier CRJ200 that crashed in November 2004.

Meanwhile, the official state news agency Xinhua announced that Henan GM Li Qiang has been relieved of his duties and replaced by Cao Bo on an acting basis. Xinhua said Vice Prime Minister Zhang Dejiang arrived Wednesday at the crash site to help set up an investigation team, which will examine the flight data and cockpit voice recorders, both of which have been recovered, in an effort to determine the cause of the crash. Embraer technicians flew to the site Tuesday to assist in the investigation.

According to Flight Safety Foundation's Aviation Safety Network, the crash marks the first hull loss for an E-190. It said the accident aircraft first flew in 2008.

http://atwonline.com/news/other-headlines/2010-8-26?cid=nl_atw_dn

I thought that the AeroRepublica flight was the first E190 hull loss? Is it standard operating procedure for Asian companies to fire the top guy after a big blunder by the company?


"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinebrenintw From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1610 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (3 years 11 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2479 times:

Quoting bjorn14 (Thread starter):
Is it standard operating procedure for Asian companies to fire the top guy after a big blunder by the company?

Pretty much -- someone has to "take responsibility" for the blunder, and it's usually the person closest to the top of the pile.

News reports here in Taiwan, however, are indicating that at least one other airline has questioned the safety of night landings at the airport.

http://www.chinapost.com.tw/china/lo...0/08/25/270085/Safety-concerns.htm



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlineB2468 From United States of America, joined Sep 2009, 90 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 11 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2410 times:

It's not uncommon in Asia for corporate leaders to step down after a disaster at their company, especially airlines.

China, which does have more of a tendency to over-react to things like this, takes it to more of an extreme, in this case, firing someone before an investigation is underway and the actual cause of the crash is known.

They do this likely to stave off public outrage and make it look like they're doing something. The company lost face and needs to recover their image. The Chinese public is ruthless and impatient if they think something is being covered up or someone is not being held responsible immediately.

A lot of it is for show, as well. Sending a vice premier is a fantastic photo-op and PR move for the government, which is wary of doing anything that might direct public outrage against them. I've lived in China for quite a while...Chinese culture is obsessed with image.

Frankly, it's silly...no aggressive actions should ever be taken until an investigation has been started and there is evidence of wrongdoing, negligence, aircraft deficiency, etc. that can identify the cause and lead to ways to correct it. But, that's the way they do things here, and no one will them otherwise.



Dash-8/ERJ/306/310/319/320/332/333/343/346/388/72S/731/732/733/734/73G/738/741/744/74E/752/762/763/77E/77W/DC9/D1C/M82
User currently offlinecloudyapple From Hong Kong, joined Jul 2005, 2454 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (3 years 11 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2234 times:

Quoting brenintw (Reply 1):
"take responsibility"

Let's be more realistic - take responsibility = be blamed. The blame culture is still dominant in Asia, I mean all of Asia. It does nothing towards fixing the problem.



A310/A319/20/21/A332/3/A343/6/A388/B732/5/7/8/B742/S/4/B752/B763/B772/3/W/E145/J41/MD11/83/90
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24837 posts, RR: 22
Reply 4, posted (3 years 11 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1710 times:

Quoting bjorn14 (Thread starter):
According to Flight Safety Foundation's Aviation Safety Network, the crash marks the first hull loss for an E-190. It said the accident aircraft first flew in 2008.

http://atwonline.com/news/other-headlines/2010-8-26?cid=nl_atw_dn

I thought that the AeroRepublica flight was the first E190 hull loss? Is it standard operating procedure for Asian companies to fire the top guy after a big blunder by the company?

The Aviation-Safety.net webite shows the status of the Aero Republica E-190 as "unknown". As far as I know it's definitenly been written off so the one lost in China is the 2nd hull loss.


User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7595 posts, RR: 32
Reply 5, posted (3 years 11 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1590 times:

Quoting bjorn14 (Thread starter):
Is it standard operating procedure for Asian companies to fire the top guy after a big blunder by the company?

I would not use the wide generalization of Asian companies - but a few Asian nations do have a culture of the top guy is always responsible when something goes wrong. It is kind of like the old ship captain's responsibility - no matter what happens on the ship - the captain is responsible.

I've seen it more from Japan than China - but that concept does exist, and some airline CEOs have resigned after a crash.

Though they lose the top job, though they are usually not out on the street.

But we have seen some very public, very harsh punishments of executives in China in recent years when something goes publicly wrong.


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