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Playboy Model Tries Opening Door In-flight, JBU522  
User currently offlinePlainplane From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 837 posts, RR: 1
Posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 22325 times:

On JetBlue 522 from Orlando to Newark yesterday, a Playboy model had a panic attack and attempted to open the door of the aircraft in flight. She had been arrested.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504083_162-20016087-504083.html

36 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCairnterriAIR From United States of America, joined Jun 2008, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 22061 times:

Silly girl.....she only wanted to go outside for a minute to get a breath of fresh air.  

User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 21963 times:

Didn't realise that cabin service was that bad in the US   

But seriously, I feel sorry for her if she was in such a state of anxiety that she had to break away.

Can the doors actually be opened in flight and, if so, how easy is it to do? Maybe the TSA will say, "don't answer that."


User currently offlineRP TPA From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 852 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 21898 times:

It looks like busty got busted.

User currently offlineoly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6685 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 21688 times:

Quoting Quokka (Reply 2):
Can the doors actually be opened in flight and, if so, how easy is it to do? Maybe the TSA will say, "don't answer that."

In round terms the pressure inside the plane is 12.2psi and, at 35000ft, the pressure outside is 3.5psi. A difference of 8.7psi. For a door, say 6ft x 3ft, that's equivalent to about 10 tons.



wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9155 posts, RR: 29
Reply 5, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 21557 times:

..and she wasn't even blonde...

 

question is, why was she arrested? She had a panic attack, which is not criminal, she is not a criminal, she tried to open a door which is, like everyone knows is impossible. So what's the point of an arrest?



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offline71Zulu From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3060 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 20640 times:

Jay Leno said she tried to open the door but because she was a Playboy bunny she couldn't read the directions on the door so she couldn't get it to open.


The good old days: Delta L-1011s at MSY
User currently onlineFlyingSicilian From Italy, joined Mar 2009, 1294 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 20473 times:

According to news reports she did not try to open the door. She got up after one bout of turb and another hit, she fell into the door and braced her self with the handle all the while chatting with the F/A. Interviewers said afterwords the F/A and model confirmed she did not try and open the door. It was just "quick reacting pax" who jumped her.


Ciao Windjet mi manchi
User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9155 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 19963 times:

Quoting FlyingSicilian (Reply 18):
It was just "quick reacting pax" who jumped her.

Nice quote. The guy took the chance of his lifetime.  I mean, whow often does one have the chance to jump a bunny?  

Now, if someone ought to be arrested in this case, then that guy for sexual abuse.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlinegr8circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3092 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 18533 times:

Quoting PanHAM (Reply 8):
question is, why was she arrested? She had a panic attack, which is not criminal, she is not a criminal, she tried to open a door which is, like everyone knows is impossible. So what's the point of an arrest?

To determine the actual cause of the actions taken by her on the plane, ensure that there was no foul intent and set an example for anyone else who might want to emulate her....


User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 17809 times:

Thanks for the clarification on how easy (or not) to open doors in flight. We see so many Hollywood and "news" programme dramatisations that it is hard to know what is possible and what is pure fiction.
I can understand why she would be arrested. Before a proper investigation, no-one would know what the motivation for her behaviour was. She may genuinely be suffering from a clinical condition and if that is so she can expect sympathetic treatment. But until she has been assessed, who can say what was going through her mind. While she may be charged with an offence, if a genuine medical condition exists (and if my understanding of US law is correct) it is unlikely that any conviction will be recorded and appropriate medical treatment will be recommended. The airlines may keep her name on file, however.


User currently offlineADent From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1358 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 17671 times:

85% of the doors on planes are impossible to open while the plane is pressurized - due to the door swinging in against the air pressure, before they swing out.

The rest have locks to prevent opening during flight - such as the swing out emergency exits on the 737NG.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6527 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 17671 times:

Quoting oly720man (Reply 7):
In round terms the pressure inside the plane is 12.2psi and, at 35000ft, the pressure outside is 3.5psi. A difference of 8.7psi. For a door, say 6ft x 3ft, that's equivalent to about 10 tons.

You have to add that the door is larger than the opening, and that to open them you have to first pull them to the inside and rotate them somewhat, that's what the pressure differential prevent. If that was not the case, the door would be very easy to open because the pressure differential would actually help !



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9155 posts, RR: 29
Reply 13, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 17458 times:

Quoting gr8circle (Reply 18):
To determine the actual cause of the actions taken by her on the plane, ensure that there was no foul intent

There's no need to arrest her for that purpose. The young lady needed medical assistance after which she can be questioned about the incident and that's it.

Quoting gr8circle (Reply 18):
and set an example for anyone else who might want to emulate her....

wow. such remarks leave me almost speechless. I could understand if you had said that someone might want to emulate the guy who jumped on the lady, but emulate a medical disorder? Set an example? OMG.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineCharlieNoble From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 16629 times:

Quoting PanHAM (Reply 22):
There's no need to arrest her for that purpose. The young lady needed medical assistance after which she can be questioned about the incident and that's it.

Maybe, maybe not.

Only in hindsight would it be obviously a medical issue vice foul play. Initial (erroneous) reports were probably that "some lady tried to open the door"...that's illegal, I imagine.

If the police asked her to stick around for questioning regarding a potential crime and she declined, arrest would be their only option. Even if the officers were concerned about her safety or theirs she'd end up in cuffs. I believe that is technically an arrest.


User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6129 posts, RR: 30
Reply 15, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 16129 times:
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Quoting Quokka (Reply 2):
But seriously, I feel sorry for her if she was in such a state of anxiety that she had to break away.

Well, I actually feel sorry that she is a Playboy model and has to fly Jet Blue. What mag do yo need to be a model of these days in order to fly another carrier´s F? What do Penthouse models fly? I suppose the ones from Hustler take Greyhound?



MGGS
User currently offlineaveugle From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 65 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 15829 times:

So I know that at cruising altitude, a typical aircraft cabin is pressurized to the equivalent of around 8000ft. Out of curiosity though, is the cabin pressurized more than the surrounding atmosphere up to the height of 8000ft? Because it would seem that if one were to try to open the cabin doors, it could work just as long as the aircraft was at a low enough altitude where there wasn't such a huge pressure difference.

User currently offlinePanman From Trinidad and Tobago, joined Aug 1999, 790 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 14633 times:

Quoting ADent (Reply 15):
85% of the doors on planes are impossible to open while the plane is pressurized - due to the door swinging in against the air pressure, before they swing out.

85%? Really? Where did you get that figure from? Because there are lots of Airbuses (read thousands) and Embraer's flying around that don't open in and swing..... (Both types which Jetblue uses)

Well I haven't worked on any Embraers, but from the picture below, it would appear that the Embraer opens using the same principles as Airbus doors and the only airbus I have not worked on is the A318. You lift the handle (exterior or interior) and the door comes out slightly, then up slighty and then translates forward. No swinging/rotating involved.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Normando Carvalho Jr.



Just questioning the 85% figure....

pAnmAn


User currently offlineMNMncrcnwjr From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 14383 times:

Quoting aveugle (Reply 20):
So I know that at cruising altitude, a typical aircraft cabin is pressurized to the equivalent of around 8000ft. Out of curiosity though, is the cabin pressurized more than the surrounding atmosphere up to the height of 8000ft?

Question?? When does the Flght deck pressurize and de pressurize a cabin on a normal flght? and how much discretion do they have to the cabin pressure settings?



CV340/580DC3DC9super80MD88/90DC10717273747576777A319/20CRJ2/7/9F27AVROJET31CITAT5/7/XSAAB340YS11Dash8E135/45/75
User currently offline413X3 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1983 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 13476 times:

Quoting Panman (Reply 25):
No, not all...

Once again, Airbus and Embraer.....

You don't seem to understand what it means to fall. Even if the door swings out, it first falls inside towards the person opening it up then swings out. That's how it stays sealed.


User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 13056 times:

In the case of rapid cabin depressurization...is it plausable that fake boobs would blow?...  Wow!  

User currently offlinemusang From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2001, 861 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 12934 times:

Quoting MNMncrcnwjr (Reply 22):
Question?? When does the Flght deck pressurize and de pressurize a cabin on a normal flght? and how much discretion do they have to the cabin pressure settings?

Typically the cruise level and the landing altitude are dialled in by the pilot(s), and if the system's in auto mode, it schedules the pressurisation itself. After engine start when air con packs are turned on, the interior starts to pressurise slightly (the 737 classic goes to approx 200 feet below its actual elevation) to ease the pressure transition during the take-off climb. At this stage flight deck windows are openable but I doubt the doors (never tried) . Even with that slight differential the door would be plugged in place. See post 7. Some types have pressure switches inside the doors which effectively lock the mechanism if there's any pressure differential at all.

If the pressurisation's not in auto mode, the crew may have to operate it manually, i.e. resetting the diff. every few thousand feet. Its a distraction one can do without, and everyone knows if we don't get it exactly right! I last had to do that, for four sectors, in approx 1999. We pretty much had it figured out by the end of the day though!

Other than that there would be no reason I can think of, in normal ops, for the pilots to want to bias the pressurisation.

About doors. Someone described the traditional Boeing sequence where the door moves inboard on opening, then rotates slightly, the top and bottom panels fold making the door smaller than the aperture, so it can be moved outward edge first. As far as I remember, on 767, 777, DC-9 series, Airbus, BAC-111, 146 and Concorde doors, there is no appreciable inward movement. The first movement is upward by a couple of inches, which relocates a series of fixed bolts on the door clear of their respective lugs (correct term?) around the door frame. This type of door is not smaller than the aperture, but it doesn't pass through it so it doesn't matter.

On closing, the door is swung into a position in the doorway, but too high by a couple of inches, and the final movement of the door is almost vertically downward, so those bolts wedge behind their "lugs". Wish I could remember the technical terms.

The door effectively becomes a plug type door, as pressurisation forces it against the fittings and movement is impossible.

Regards - musang


User currently offlinegr8circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3092 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 10486 times:

Quoting PanHAM (Reply 17):
Quoting gr8circle (Reply 18):
and set an example for anyone else who might want to emulate her....

wow. such remarks leave me almost speechless. I could understand if you had said that someone might want to emulate the guy who jumped on the lady, but emulate a medical disorder? Set an example? OMG.

You seem to be taking my comments totally out of context....while having a medical disorder on a plane is completely understandable, trying to open doors in midflight is not acceptable behaviour....I quite fail to understand why you've twisted my comments to make it look that way....I think it was quite apparent to all else who've read my post, that I was referring to the door opening and not the medical disorder....


User currently offlineGlobalCabotage From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 602 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 10302 times:

Just let us law abiding citizens with a CHL (thorough background check by State's, Fed's, etc.) carry on board legally and this crap wouldn't happen. We would save taxpayer money on sky marshalls and do a better job. Of course, this will open a whole new can of worms. But I see no reason why a certified passenger (or crew member) can not carry on board. Heck, you can board an local train, bus, or AmCrap and carry. Give the law abiding citizens and crew members the right to carry, and we will stop this s*^(!

User currently offlineElevated From United States of America, joined Feb 2010, 296 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 9325 times:

Quoting GlobalCabotage (Reply 31):
Just let us law abiding citizens with a CHL (thorough background check by State's, Fed's, etc.) carry on board legally and this crap wouldn't happen. We would save taxpayer money on sky marshalls and do a better job. Of course, this will open a whole new can of worms. But I see no reason why a certified passenger (or crew member) can not carry on board. Heck, you can board an local train, bus, or AmCrap and carry. Give the law abiding citizens and crew members the right to carry, and we will stop this s*^(!

Right because when people carry down on the ground all this (insert your expletive) is really much more under control.

I am sure a Concealed Handgun License is the answer...I can just imagine a F/A being the first to get attacked by some crazy CHL person going off and refusing compliance and ending up shooting off rounds.

How many people with guns lately have gone bananas and killed scores of people? How does that make anyone more sane with a "clean" background? What a joke.

Do you read what you write? I am not sure which is scarier, your words or her actions. At lest she has a serious condition and it's evident.


25 EMBQA : Just because the door opens outward does not mean it can be opened in flight. I have tried to open a cabin door at just 0.4 deltaP after ground testi
26 aviateur : From my book... It seems that a week can't go by without hearing the latest story about a passenger who went cuckoo and tried to yank open an emergenc
27 flyorski : What? How will you stop this? Shoot her?
28 PanHAM : Nice joke. Now, let's rain brain and define "law abiding citizens" - is that someone who thinks that he's right and the other guy is wrong? Seriously
29 Panman : Please. Don't argue the point. You are WRONG. I've had to rig the type of door I am talking about, I have had to change the door guides. They do NOT
30 Panman : 767 doors move inwards and then upwards into the fuselage (spring drum assisted). Don't ever open the door without a slide raft attached or a ballast
31 tavong : There are psychiatric disorders where people "emulates" illness, and many people just for caughting attention would try to "emulate" this girl, is no
32 musang : Quite right Panman. That was what's known as a brain f@rt. Scrub 767 from my list of recollections! But see my list in reply 21. Spoke to our mainten
33 Aloha717200 : Looks like no one else managed to see this comment. While she may have panicked because of the turbulence it doesn't appear she INTENDED to try and o
34 Delimit : Shows at 3:00 and 6:00. Enjoy the buffet!
35 Aesma : Shooting a gun in a plane is clearly a hazard, however a bullet hole into the door would not cause any accident, it would not even depressurize the p
36 dazeflight : I guess he would either blame it on her behaviour or not say anything because he blew a few holes in the plane with the expected results. What a moro
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