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Do Retro/special/new Paint Schemes Have Any Impact  
User currently offlinekanban From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 3522 posts, RR: 27
Posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3377 times:
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Recently there have been quite a few threads wanting or commenting on new, special or retro paint schemes. Do they really have any impact on ticket sales?

There was a office motivation study years ago that theorized that any change good or bad had a positive effect on personnel. However can that be applied to planes since with new airport security the closest non passengers get to seeing these changes are ads and paying passengers have already laid out their money and probably don't care what the design looks like (plus they are most likely too close).

So is all this a value added activity for anyone other than the advertising agencies that push it?

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineordpark From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 574 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3370 times:
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I don't know what impact a Retro paint job has on the Public, but I can tell you it has a tremendous impact on employees. It sparks the imagination and curiosity of younger employees and takes us old timers back to a more interesting era. We need more of them!

User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15735 posts, RR: 27
Reply 2, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3346 times:

Quoting kanban (Thread starter):
Do they really have any impact on ticket sales?

No.

Quoting kanban (Thread starter):
So is all this a value added activity for anyone other than the advertising agencies that push it?

A little bit of buzz and some employee morale perhaps.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineGeneralAviator From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3264 times:

People tend to want to be apart of something that catches their eye. In my opinion, livery is a form of art and just like other forms of art it inspires an emotional response. This is especially evident in responses to photographs posted on airliners.net. It has been proven that people will be loyal to a brand that makes an impression on them. Southwest Airlines could be used as an example of how livery can be used to improve ticket sales. They have an arrow pointing to the cargo hold. The arrow has text on it that says, "Free bags fly here." This is an innovative way to use livery to express a perk of flying with Southwest that could very likely lead to more ticket sales.

"Southwest Airlines is taking its ‘Bags Fly Free’ advertising a step further by decorating more than 50 aircraft with decals bearing the slogan ‘Free Bags Fly Here’ along with an arrow pointing to the aircraft’s cargo hold."

Found: http://www.airlinesanddestinations.c...s-to-show-that-free-bags-fly-here/

[Edited 2010-10-13 21:31:25]

User currently offlineOwleye From Netherlands, joined Feb 2006, 959 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3112 times:

I agree here with ordpark and GeneralAviator, special schemes (retro, themed, promo) have impact on both personnel and pax. Promo liveries for the airlines themselves (like the Southwest's "free bags fly here" or Virgin's "No way BA-AA") or for advertisors (Southwest Seaworld Shamu planes) can increase ticket sales. Lately I was in Vantaa and saw the retro Finnair Airbus waiting at the gate: that impressed me though I did not book at Finnair. New, better say "re-vitalized" paint schemes could give a boost to the airlines' image which for certain gives more confidence to the public and the airline's personnel. When people turn their heads by seeing an attractive good looking branded aircraft that broadcasts a good brand feeling and/or a triggering message than the livery is already successful.


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User currently offlineMNMncrcnwjr From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 2984 times:

Now IF DL would like to do a Heritage AC (non obvious DC9) then this gem gets my vote ..

From www.hermantheduck.org




CV340/580DC3DC9super80MD88/90DC10717273747576777A319/20CRJ2/7/9F27AVROJET31CITAT5/7/XSAAB340YS11Dash8E135/45/75
User currently offlinekanban From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 3522 posts, RR: 27
Reply 6, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 2826 times:
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so far the gist is "it's good for employee morale" and "it can increase ticket sales".. both are subjective opinions. Is there any documentation that quantifies these opinions? For instance, Alaska spent a ton to do the salmon plane, are the more people actually trying to find and book on that plane as compared to the standard Eskimo flying the same city pair?...

Employee morale is fickle, and doesn't necessarily equate to improved job performance... firing one manager probably has the same effect. ( there was a study where a company fired/transferred one person every month to measure employee moral.. initially it went up each time, then it became routine and no change occurred... Note: the people fired were in on the study)
The placarding (Free bags... etc) is interesting in an advertisement, however who but the baggage loaders actually see it? Then there are the flying billboards (Shamu etc)... has the advertising company (Sea world) seen any gate increase? Like wise how many people say they would rather drive than fly that blah liveried aircraft?


User currently offlinejunction From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 766 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2798 times:

I definitely think the retro liveries are more for employee benefit then anything else. We all know about them and what they mean, but most of the time the general public does not. With the CO 75 year anniversary livery I heard more comments from people just assuming it was a new livery rather then something retro. The US Airways America West retro 319 usually gets the reaction of "I just saw a US Airways plane still in HP colors" more then anything else. And how many people actually know the WN Shamu plane is advertising Sea World?
Don’t get me wrong, I really like all that stuff but pretty sure there is zero effect on ticket sales.


User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15735 posts, RR: 27
Reply 8, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2761 times:

Quoting kanban (Reply 6):
so far the gist is "it's good for employee morale" and "it can increase ticket sales"..

Retrojets aren't really going to increase ticket sales. There is a difference between a scheme that is promoting something (like a paid logojet, a destination like Alaska's leis, or a cause like DL's pink 767) vs. a retrojet which really just promotes a company's history which most of the flying public doesn't know about or doesn't care about.

Quoting kanban (Reply 6):
are the more people actually trying to find and book on that plane as compared to the standard Eskimo flying the same city pair?...

How could someone do that?



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinemayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10398 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2726 times:

Quoting GeneralAviator (Reply 3):
"Southwest Airlines is taking its ‘Bags Fly Free’ advertising a step further by decorating more than 50 aircraft with decals bearing the slogan ‘Free Bags Fly Here’ along with an arrow pointing to the aircraft’s cargo hold."

They only did that so the WN rampers would know where the bags go.  



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlinecatiii From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 3029 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2633 times:

Quoting kanban (Reply 6):
so far the gist is "it's good for employee morale" and "it can increase ticket sales".. both are subjective opinions. Is there any documentation that quantifies these opinions?

Is there any documentation that having anything painted on the airplane serves any business purpose? Why not leave them bare metal with nothing at all on them?


User currently offlinespacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3625 posts, RR: 12
Reply 11, posted (3 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2486 times:

Quoting catiii (Reply 10):
Is there any documentation that having anything painted on the airplane serves any business purpose? Why not leave them bare metal with nothing at all on them?

Been covered many times on this forum. You can't leave the metal bare or it will corrode. Given that, you may as well paint it - it doesn't cost that much more. Most of the cost of painting an aircraft is the downtime, labor and equipment, and you're going to have most of those same costs whether you paint it or just seal it.

As for whether it serves any business purpose, of course it does. Why does any company bother spending any money at all on packaging if it doesn't serve any purpose? Kellogg's could just put a plain helvetica "KELLOGG'S CORN FLAKES" on a white cereal box and it should do just as well in the marketplace, right? Oh, until Post puts something nicer on their boxes... which will force Kellogg's to answer in kind, ad infinitum. This is how branding got started in the first place - it wasn't with highly paid brand consultants, it was one guy who noticed that he could take the same stuff as his competitor, stick a nicer label on it and it'd sell better. Branding is really just common sense. The same is true of airlines. Sure, everybody could just go with sealed (not painted) metal, until one airline decides to spruce it up and then all of a sudden everybody else has to do the same or they'll be left behind by this spiffy-looking fresh face that stands out at the airport and suddenly has its name and logo all over the place.

[Edited 2010-10-14 20:55:49]


I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
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