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Will We See More Widebodies Flying For UA Domestic  
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9168 posts, RR: 15
Posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 5954 times:

In the past we had the DC-10, B 767-200 flying for UA domestic routes. With the merger will we see more widebodies flying for UA domestically?

What are the current widebody routes?

27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5771 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5818 times:

My personal opinion is that no, we will not.
The trend toward lower capacity will only continue- one way to achieve this is to limit large aircraft to routes where they're absolutely necessary.
Simply put, you're better off flying two 737-9ER's between ORD and DEN than you are a 777-200ER.
There are, certainly, exceptions. Repositioning flights, high cargo demand, high premium cabin demand. But otherwise, I suspect they'll adapt CO's pattern of operating 737s and a few 753s domestically. UA has a very useful 752 fleet, coupled with also capable A32X aircraft.
I expect some older widebodies to bite the dust, and others repositioned to make the most of their capability.


User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9168 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 5493 times:

But certain routes like SFO-DEN, SFO-ORD, SFO-JFK, LAX-JFK can sustain multiple widebody flights. What about the B 747-400 which is not being upgraded? Will they upgrade it? Maybe the B 767-200s can do the job?

User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16859 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 5442 times:

The usage of Widebodies on Domestic routes will decrease, and the usage of Widebodies on International routes (EWR-MAD, EWR-AMS etc..) will increase. Also I expect the 757-300s to take over some of the West Coast-Hawaii flights to free up Widebodies for International routes.


Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16859 posts, RR: 51
Reply 4, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 5440 times:

Quoting United Airline (Reply 2):
But certain routes like SFO-DEN, SFO-ORD, SFO-JFK, LAX-JFK can sustain multiple widebody flights.

The 757 aircraft UA uses on it's PS services between JFK and LAX and SFO have roughly the same capacity as one of their 737-500s.



Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlineMSPNWA From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 1935 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5317 times:

Quoting United Airline (Thread starter):
With the merger will we see more widebodies flying for UA domestically?

I think more, if there's any significant change at all. Now that might be hard to do since UA already runs a sizable domestic widebody schedule (thank you, UA), but I think the potential for more is there. I say that for two reasons. First, UA hub-to-hub routes between SFO-ORD-DEN-IAD already have a high amount of traffic and see a high frequency--sometimes hourly (I know EWR-IAH is that way too). Adding frequency doesn't seem necessary or even possible unless large jets are still used. And second, if the DL/NW acquisition was any indication, hub-to-hub traffic in general will see an increase. I look at MSP/DTW-ATL as examples. The summer of 2008 saw about 8-9 flights each a day--all of them small mainline jets like DCs, MDs, and Airbuses. This year it was about 10-12 flights a day and the average airplane size went way up. 757s are now common (esp. MSP-ATL), and widebodies are present, particularly the 777 on DTW-ATL.

So to end it, I see capacity and frequency to increase. I don't think more 757s are going to account for all of that.

[Edited 2010-10-16 20:03:52]

User currently offlineDeltAirlines From United States of America, joined May 1999, 8897 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5278 times:

Quoting MSPNWA (Reply 5):
I think more, if there's any significant change at all. Now that might be hard to do since UA already runs a sizable domestic widebody schedule (thank you, UA), but I think the potential for more is there. I say that for two reasons. First, UA hub-to-hub routes between SFO-ORD-DEN-IAD already have a high amount of traffic and see a high frequency--sometimes hourly. Adding frequency doesn't seem necessary or even possible unless large jets are still used. And second, if the DL/NW acquisition was any indication, hub-to-hub traffic in general will see an increase. I look at MSP/DTW-ATL as examples. The summer of 2008 saw about 8-9 flights each a day--all of them small mainline jets like DCs, MDs, and Airbuses. This year it was about 10-12 flights a day and the average airplane size went way up. 757s are now common (esp. MSP-ATL), and widebodies are present, particularly the 777 on DTW-ATL.

I'm going to disagree here.

A few points:
- United's current 767-300 domestic fleet are 767-300ERs, so they can be refitted with an international product and used for additional international expansion pretty quickly if necessary. I wouldn't be shocked to see some of this happen to give some added lift out of EWR.
- The United network is very reliant on double-connections...just take a look at legacy United routing rules - they seem to be the type of airline that doesn't mind a double connection - you fly into your nearest hub, go to another United hub, then to your final destination. With the additions of the IAH/EWR hubs, you might see some of that forced hub-hub connectivity fade away a bit. There will likely still be positioning flights to move equipment around (like you mention with the 777 on DTW-ATL - which is done primarily to get 777s to/from DTW-Asia flying back down to the Atlanta base), but it won't necessitate more hub-hub widebodies for that sake.
- Airplane size is up on MSP-ATL now, but frequencies are about the same. Northwest was running around 5-6 DC-9s/A320s a day on the route; Delta was around 8 daily 737s/MD-80s/CRJ-900s. Now, it's a mix of around 8 150ish-seaters (A320, 737, MD-80/90) and a handful of 757s. There definitely is an uptick in hub-hub traffic, but on the flip-side there's been a decrease in MSP-DTW (9 flights/day now, vs. the 14-15 NW had; gone are the wingtip flights where there would be 2-3 DC-9s/A320s/757s leaving within 10 minutes of each other on the route). MEM-DTW has taken a hit too, down to 3x DC-9 and an A320 as well.


User currently offlineMSPNWA From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 1935 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 5190 times:

Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 6):
- United's current 767-300 domestic fleet are 767-300ERs, so they can be refitted with an international product and used for additional international expansion pretty quickly if necessary. I wouldn't be shocked to see some of this happen to give some added lift out of EWR.

If that happens, then that capacity needs to replaced somehow. It's easy to say "the 763 is going international" and make that a reason. But that doesn't change the route demand. As it stands already, additional frequency options are limited. Aircraft size is sometimes also limited since 757 or larger aircraft are currently common. Like DL has shown, the changes are towards larger aircraft, regardless of frequency.

Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 6):
- The United network is very reliant on double-connections...just take a look at legacy United routing rules - they seem to be the type of airline that doesn't mind a double connection - you fly into your nearest hub, go to another United hub, then to your final destination. With the additions of the IAH/EWR hubs, you might see some of that forced hub-hub connectivity fade away a bit.

I don't see a change happening. It's that way at the new DL, and I don't see any difference coming with the new UA. Airports like ORD, IAH, SFO, EWR, IAD, and LAX are already large and cover many, many destinations. If you were needing a double connect before, I don't see that disappearing now.

Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 6):
- Airplane size is up on MSP-ATL now, but frequencies are about the same. Northwest was running around 5-6 DC-9s/A320s a day on the route; Delta was around 8 daily 737s/MD-80s/CRJ-900s. Now, it's a mix of around 8 150ish-seaters (A320, 737, MD-80/90) and a handful of 757s. There definitely is an uptick in hub-hub traffic, but on the flip-side there's been a decrease in MSP-DTW (9 flights/day now, vs. the 14-15 NW had; gone are the wingtip flights where there would be 2-3 DC-9s/A320s/757s leaving within 10 minutes of each other on the route). MEM-DTW has taken a hit too, down to 3x DC-9 and an A320 as well.

I forgot the DL regionals. So up DTW-ATL to about 12-13 daily and MSP-ATL to 9-10 daily back in 2008. But, like we've said, aircraft size is the difference. Only one regular regional (DTW-MSP). Rarely an aircraft under 142 seats. My rough math says we're looking at 25-33% increases in capacity here. Even MSP-DTW, which has seen about a 33% drop in frequency has retained just as many 757s, increasing the aircraft capacity average. The real loser with NW/DL was a smaller hub like MEM that lost its importance under DL. The only UA/CO hub like that is CLE, and widebodies aren't there anyway.


User currently offlineCALPSAFltSkeds From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 2617 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 5110 times:

Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 6):
- United's current 767-300 domestic fleet are 767-300ERs, so they can be refitted with an international product and used for additional international expansion pretty quickly if necessary. I wouldn't be shocked to see some of this happen to give some added lift out of EWR.
- The United network is very reliant on double-connections...just take a look at legacy United routing rules - they seem to be the type of airline that doesn't mind a double connection - you fly into your nearest hub, go to another United hub, then to your final destination. With the additions of the IAH/EWR hubs, you might see some of that forced hub-hub connectivity fade away a bit. There will likely still be positioning flights to move equipment around (like you mention with the 777 on DTW-ATL - which is done primarily to get 777s to/from DTW-Asia flying back down to the Atlanta base), but it won't necessitate more hub-hub widebodies for that sake.

Exactly:

With more hubs, there is more overflying of current hubs. Markets connecting especially through ORD and DEN may connect at IAH and EWR, then overfly the middle of the country. And, UAs high density 763ER have only about 25 more seats than CO 753s while the international 763ER have 40 fewer seats. It is counterproductive to fly the 763ER and 772 in international config on domestic routes as they give away 60 to 80 seats per departure.

CO is receiving 739ERs, which can sub for the 753s (with added frequencies if needed), to sub for 763s, freeing widebodies for the routes they are built to handle.

Sure widebodies are great to fly on, but in this age of trying to make a profit and fuel is very expensive, Fying widebodies isn't efficient, even if it does allow more empty seats for NRs, of which I'm one.

The new UA should choose a strategy for international F service, which I think will be F on Asia and selected European markets, then convert some of the UA widebodies to meet the numbers needed for international and Hawaiian demand. The 772A model works OK to Hawaii, mostly from ORD and should continue.

I see IAH-HNL maybe being downgraded from 2 764s to one 772A Hawaiian configured aircraft, several West Coast-Hawaii going 753 vs. 763/772 and removal of international widebodies from domestic service. I'm not sure if the 772A can make it EWR-HNL, so it may continue as a 764. I see HNL-GUM-NRT going with a UA high density 763ER.

The new UA could use the 2 764s from IAH-HNL and 2 more form HNL-GUM-NRT to open several EWR and IAD Europe markets. The 772A for IAH-HNL and 763s for HNL-GUM-NRT could from from from hub-to-hub UA services and selected Hawaiian flights which would go to 753 aircraft.


User currently offlinewashingtonian From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 5110 times:

How many domestic 763s does United have? Since the international fleet was recently renovated, I expect the domestic 767s to be the first to be refurbished and put on EWR-Europe flights as 2-class aircraft. United also has a lot of flexibility to decide now what to do about 2-class versus 3-class since most of the 777s haven't been renovated yet...

User currently offlinewashingtonian From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 5095 times:

Also, are United flights to Hawaii exclusively on the 2-class 767 and 777s (except for the HNL-NRT flight?)

User currently offlineADent From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1376 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 5047 times:

If you want more domestic wide bodies, which international wide bodies are you going to reallocate?



UA didn't have any widebodies currently in production on order - nothing arriving soon.

CO is the same, except they have some early slots for the 787. Those already have international routes waiting for them, but should see some limited domestic service.


User currently offlineVC10er From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 2885 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 5035 times:
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While UA p.s. Is great for many trans-con pax over anything else, it seems p.s. Really serves premium pax from SYD or many, many UA flights coming in from Asia and can continue 5 to 7 hours to New York. Before that we had 747's at JFK!
looking foreward may we see internationally configured 767's to fly the p.s. Routes? The gravy being UA attracts a large celeb crowd from LAX/JFK/LAX route much more. It's easy to see Paula Abdul and Clive Davis buying FF First among thousands more. And if intl configured 767's are connecting many more cities (IAD comes to mind as well as ORD - Boston?) even then from IAD or EWR to LATAM.
i see a luxury UA widebody doing a few more routes. Wouldn't be surprised if UA being #1 from Boston, NY, DC, ORD etc to SYD, China, Vietnam, Bijing do to a continued lux wide body from LAX & SFO.
(better lounges 'showers and lounge chairs in quiet rooms)



The world is missing love, let's use our flights to spread it!
User currently offlineCALPSAFltSkeds From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 2617 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 5013 times:

Quoting washingtonian (Reply 9):
How many domestic 763s does United have? Since the international fleet was recently renovated, I expect the domestic 767s to be the first to be refurbished and put on EWR-Europe flights as 2-class aircraft. United also has a lot of flexibility to decide now what to do about 2-class versus 3-class since most of the 777s haven't been renovated yet...

It looks like 14 of the 35 are in the high density configuration, which fly heavily to Hawaii and hub-to-hub. Additionally, there are 6 in high density 772A aircraft, which are quite capable of flying European routes. there are 36 in International configurations, undergoing conversion to upgraded seating.


User currently offlineOH-LGA From Denmark, joined Oct 1999, 1436 posts, RR: 19
Reply 14, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 4972 times:

Quoting washingtonian (Reply 10):
Also, are United flights to Hawaii exclusively on the 2-class 767 and 777s (except for the HNL-NRT flight?)

No. Although the majority are flown by the 2-class 767s and 777s, a fair smattering of ETOPs 757-200s operate some of the flights to Hawaii, mainly the SFO/LAX-LIH flights and usually the late evening SFO-HNL departure as well (which turns for a late red-eye back to SFO).



Head in the clouds... yet feet planted firmly on the ground.
User currently offlinewashingtonian From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4673 times:

Quoting OH-LGA (Reply 14):
No. Although the majority are flown by the 2-class 767s and 777s, a fair smattering of ETOPs 757-200s operate some of the flights to Hawaii, mainly the SFO/LAX-LIH flights and usually the late evening SFO-HNL departure as well (which turns for a late red-eye back to SFO).

I should have said ETOPS 757-200s as well. But there are no 3-class 767s/777s on Hawaii flights right?


User currently offlinescorpy From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 400 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4620 times:

Quoting CALPSAFltSkeds (Reply 13):
there are 36 in International configurations, undergoing conversion to upgraded seating.

UA have 46 International 777 for a total of 52.


User currently offlineOH-LGA From Denmark, joined Oct 1999, 1436 posts, RR: 19
Reply 17, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4500 times:

Quoting washingtonian (Reply 15):
I should have said ETOPS 757-200s as well. But there are no 3-class 767s/777s on Hawaii flights right?

Not regularly. You'll see a 3-class 777 or a 747-400 subbed in on rare occasion. It gets a little messy if it's a 3-class 777 subbed in for a 2-class 777 though - considering you lose 115 Economy seats and add only 25 premium seats.



Head in the clouds... yet feet planted firmly on the ground.
User currently offlinedrerx7 From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5173 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4496 times:

Quoting washingtonian (Reply 15):
I should have said ETOPS 757-200s as well. But there are no 3-class 767s/777s on Hawaii flights right?

Correct - as far as I know. I believe that the domestic widebodies will continue just as they have. There are some routes that could benefit from upgauging from 753s like IAH/EWR-LAX/SFO. Those freed up 753s could go to relieve some (not all) Hawaii 767s. Any CO route insiders have a preview of some schedules?



Third Coast born, means I'm Texas raised
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9607 posts, RR: 52
Reply 19, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 4383 times:

Quoting United Airline (Reply 2):


But certain routes like SFO-DEN, SFO-ORD, SFO-JFK, LAX-JFK can sustain multiple widebody flights. What about the B 747-400 which is not being upgraded? Will they upgrade it? Maybe the B 767-200s can do the job?
Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 6):
The United network is very reliant on double-connections...just take a look at legacy United routing rules - they seem to be the type of airline that doesn't mind a double connection - you fly into your nearest hub, go to another United hub, then to your final destination.

SFO-ORD, ORD-DEN, IAD-ORD, IAD-DEN & DEN-LAX will stay around with widebodies. UA needs these for maintenance availability. SFO is the main maintenance center, but no 3 class 767 flights leave from there, so domestic tags are required. Similarly, DEN does maintenance on 777s. For these reasons, UA will continue to rotate planes domestically. IAD has a large international network, but since it is the newest hub, it does not even have a hangar.

Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 6):

- United's current 767-300 domestic fleet are 767-300ERs, so they can be refitted with an international product and used for additional international expansion pretty quickly if necessary. I wouldn't be shocked to see some of this happen to give some added lift out of EWR.

It's possible to switch them, but Hawaii is an important market and UA is number 1. CO operates 767s to Hawaii and has them with the international configuration which means that they have fewer seats than possible. I see the 767 domestic fleet staying as it is and having the CO 767-400ERs pulled out of Hawaii. The Hawaii/Micronesia configured 767-400ERs only have 12 more seats than UA's domestic 767 300s. Unless having BusinessFirst really creates a positive return on yield, pulling these planes out of Hawaii could be a good thing. The 767 domestics operating within the lower 48 could easily be replaced by 757-300s. That would give EWR the additional lift to Europe necessary.

Quoting CALPSAFltSkeds (Reply 8):
It is counterproductive to fly the 763ER and 772 in international config on domestic routes as they give away 60 to 80 seats per departure.

As I said earlier, it is counter productive, but at a minimum it is needed for maintenance positioning during peak season. In the winter schedule when the international schedule is pulled down, they have the extra planes which is why DEN-ORD has so much widebody planes.

Quoting VC10er (Reply 12):
While UA p.s. Is great for many trans-con pax over anything else, it seems p.s. Really serves premium pax from SYD or many, many UA flights coming in from Asia and can continue 5 to 7 hours to New York. Before that we had 747's at JFK!

P.S. does have some connectivity to the Asia bank in SFO, but the vast majority of the passengers are O/D. If it was dependant on international connections, then other flights at the Asia bank to cities like IAD & BOS would see 3 classes of service.

Quoting CALPSAFltSkeds (Reply 13):

It looks like 14 of the 35 are in the high density configuration, which fly heavily to Hawaii and hub-to-hub. Additionally, there are 6 in high density 772A aircraft, which are quite capable of flying European routes.

The 777s to Hawaii are some of the oldest in the UA network and can fly IAD-Europe but still can't operate longer routes. However, having a plane with 348 seats for routes to Hawaii is a big money maker. The 777s go out filled to HNL & OGG. They are money makers where they are. UA is the largest airline between the mainland and Hawaii and it is because they operate large planes. Having 4 daily SFO-HNL flights (over 1100 seats) with widebodies is more efficient than operating 7 757s.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineCALPSAFltSkeds From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 2617 posts, RR: 9
Reply 20, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4203 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 19):
It's possible to switch them, but Hawaii is an important market and UA is number 1. CO operates 767s to Hawaii and has them with the international configuration which means that they have fewer seats than possible. I see the 767 domestic fleet staying as it is and having the CO 767-400ERs pulled out of Hawaii. The Hawaii/Micronesia configured 767-400ERs only have 12 more seats than UA's domestic 767 300s. Unless having BusinessFirst really creates a positive return on yield, pulling these planes out of Hawaii could be a good thing. The 767 domestics operating within the lower 48 could easily be replaced by 757-300s. That would give EWR the additional lift to Europe necessary.

CO has two configurations and almost exclusively flied the more dense version on Hawaii. There could be more seats, but my count would add just 11 seats. CO has 5 across up front vs. 6 and there could be an added Y row if BF went back to 36 inch pitch.
That being said, I agree with you that the 764 is better used on Europe and the domestic 763s could be flown on Micronesia and routes like EWR-HNL. I think UA will sub a 772A on IAH-HNL, replacing 2 764s. I'd hope that UA would pull a few 763s in domestic config off hub-to-hub routes and selected Hawaii rotues - these aircraft could go into EWR-HNL-GUM-NRT service (3 would do it) and UA would not have to change configs on the 763ERs, which would be a plus.
The 764s in Hawaiian config could be either easily changed from 20/326 to 35/200 or fl;own on European tours with higher Y demand. Conversion to 35BF would not include moving walls and the conversion could take place wen the lie-flats are added.

Summary Suggestion:

CO 764ERs, 5 units released for new European service or upgrading existing flights (with or w/o high density config)
2 from IAH-HNL, one from EWR-HNL, one from HNL-GUM and one from GUM-HNL

CO 753: 4 units reallocated to a fraction of UA hub-to-hub and Hawaiian routes from CO routes to be replaced by new 739ER deliveries

UA 763ER 3 domestic config units freed form domestic or selected Hawiann service by subbing CO 753s :
1 to EWR-HNL, 1 to HNL-GUM, 1 to GUM-NRT

UA 772A 1 unit released from domestic or Hawaii to fly IAH-HNL

I don't think UA is required to operate as many 763s on domestic service for maintenance. At a minimum CO does maintenance in HNL & GUM.

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 19):
The 777s to Hawaii are some of the oldest in the UA network and can fly IAD-Europe but still can't operate longer routes. However, having a plane with 348 seats for routes to Hawaii is a big money maker. The 777s go out filled to HNL & OGG. They are money makers where they are. UA is the largest airline between the mainland and Hawaii and it is because they operate large planes. Having 4 daily SFO-HNL flights (over 1100 seats) with widebodies is more efficient than operating 7 757s.

I am not calling for a wholesale removal of 763ERs from Hawaii. But, note that UA's 763ER has only 26 more seats than a 753 and a combination of a 763 and 752 has fewer seats than 2 753s. There will always be peak flights where you need more seats and those should stay with 772A or 763ERs, but there are others where a 753 would do just fine. SFO may be a special case due to UA dominance and the hub, but LAX-HNL could go 753s in lieu of 763/752 and provide more seats to Hawaii while nettin 764ERs for European service. The same could be said for outer island service where a 753 is real close to 763 capacity.


User currently offlineRamblinMan From United States of America, joined Oct 2010, 1138 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3889 times:

As much as I love snagging a ride on a widebody on a domestic or Caribbean route, it doesn't make a whole lot of economic sense, aside from the network reasons mentioned above. The fact is, planes like the 753 and the 321 can move a whole lot of people on these segments. It makes more sense to use these planes and free up a widebody for an international route.

The US is nowhere near the point of actually needing domestic widebody flights a-la Japan. Busy routes like ORD-ATL see a lot of RJs.


User currently offlineCarlisle From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 271 posts, RR: 5
Reply 22, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 3645 times:

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 1):
I expect some older widebodies to bite the dust

If this is the case, I surely hope they don't scrap N777UA. Being that it's an older piece of metal, perhaps they could continue to use it on domestic routes?

Jeremy Carlisle



"CLEAN PLANES AND DIRTY MARTINIS" (Delta)
User currently offlineNASCARAirforce From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3178 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3535 times:

Between the hub cities I am sure we will see the widebodies continue to fly

DEN-EWR,
SFO-ORD
IAH - ORD
LAX -EWR
IAD-IAH
etc

We still see the occassional Continental 767-200/400, or UAL 767-300 at MCO from their hub cities. Of course TPA will see its share of UAL/COA widebodies with Pemco there.

Delta is doing it more it seems, as someone else said between ATL, DTW and MSP - but also we have been seeing a lot of A330s from DTW and MSP lately, as well as a 747-400 from DTW, as well as it almost seems daily 767-300 from ATL.


User currently offlineDC8FanJet From United States of America, joined exactly 8 years ago today! , 397 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (3 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3475 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 19):
The 777s to Hawaii are some of the oldest in the UA network and can fly IAD-Europe but still can't operate longer routes. However, having a plane with 348 seats for routes to Hawaii is a big money maker. The 777s go out filled to

Not at all accurate. The domestic 777's were purpose ordered, are relatively new among the UA 777's.

They are identical performance wise to the 777-2000='s that fly ORD & IAD to Europe. Range with full pax/bags
and a little cargo is +/_ 5000 miles. (ORD/GRU at 5200 is about the longest segment flown with the non ER 777)


25 drerx7 : When will the Jan schedules be uploaded for UA/CO? There may be some changes occurring then...
26 RoseFlyer : UA prefers to ferry its widebodies to PEMCO rather than operate them as scheduled routes. I stand corrected. They were deliveries number 31-38 except
27 drerx7 : IAH-IAD is going 4x752 and a couple of regionals.
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