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The 747SP-fastest Crusing Commercial Plane?  
User currently offlineDonder10 From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 6660 posts, RR: 21
Posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1463 times:

I was looking at the site www.worldairroutes.com and I found one route from South African Airways.On a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town the 747SP was crusing at .871 mach@43,000 feet.IS this normal for the 747 SP?If so it must be the fastest crusing commerical jet in service surely?Thanks,Alex

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1376 times:

Concorde is faster!
Iain


User currently offlineDonder10 From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 6660 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1364 times:

LOL true but excluding concorde.

User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1353 times:

TU-144!
Iain


User currently offlineSonic99 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1351 times:


Donder,

Ya that's pretty quick, but is that ground speed or air speed. Second, if the pilot caught the jetstream then that plane will be cruising for sure. BTW, I was on an AF flight from YUL to CDG and the speed indicator on the cabin screen showed 1,083 kph (relative to the ground).
That was in a 747-400.

Cheers

Sonic99


User currently offlineAir NZ From New Zealand, joined Jun 2001, 228 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1337 times:

The fastest not supersonic would be the Boeing 727max speed 1017km/h (549kt).

User currently offlineLZ-TLT From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 431 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1295 times:

NOT the 727.

Talking about the fastest subsonic airliners out there:
Convair 880/990
Tu-154(all series)


User currently offlineMr.BA From Singapore, joined Sep 2000, 3423 posts, RR: 22
Reply 7, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1289 times:

I heard the B747SP can cruise at 49,000 feet at the maximum. Is it true?

Best Regards,

alvin



Boeing747 万岁!
User currently offlineN400QX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1266 times:

Well, I believe the B744 barely beats the SP. The 744 can cruise at Mach .90. (I'm about 95% sure of this Big grin )

User currently offlineAmbasaid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1244 times:

Actually all B747's have the same limiting MMO of 0.92, but you won't find anyone flying even close to that speed.

The cruise speed on the 744 will vary according to your cost index, but between 0.82-0.87 would be good. As for the SP, M0.85.

Max Alt for all B747's including the SP as per the AFM = 45,100 feet.


User currently offlineIkarus From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 3524 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1225 times:

Sonic99: If the speed is quoted as Machnumber it can only be airspeed, as the Machnumber varies with altitude!

As far as I know, cruising at M0.85 to M0.9 is nothing special - most modern jetliners do it.

Regards

Ikarus


User currently offlineSonic99 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 1182 times:


Hey Ikarus,

Yeah I hear you. Look, the 744 I was on obviously caught the jetstream and that added to the ground-relative speed. I'm sure the pilot max-ed the throttles to whatever the top speed is - we left YUL nearly 2 hours late but landed in CDG early! That was a quick trip over the pond for me... actually the quickest yet, just a shade under 5.5 hrs.

Sonic


User currently offlineLowfareair From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1172 times:

Iainhol: you are wrong on both posts. The Concorde and Tu-144 are not in service.

User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6296 posts, RR: 33
Reply 13, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1141 times:

Give the kid a break. He was being funny. The Concorde will be back in service though.

Steve  Smile



Damn, this website is getting worse daily.
User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1144 times:

If you read the subject it says 'commercial planes'. Also please note some one mentioned Convairs which are also not in service, but I guess you do not know about them!
Iain


User currently offlineB757300 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 4114 posts, RR: 23
Reply 15, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1146 times:




"There is no victory at bargain basement prices."
User currently offlinePenguinflies From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 989 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1119 times:

getting technical

If you count NetJets as a commerical operator (Part 135), the fastest plane is the Citation X.


User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (13 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1108 times:

Mach is measured by airspeed, not groundspeed, so whether the plane had caught a favorable jetstream or not is entirely irrelavant.

The SP, with much less weight and the same wing as the 747-200 and -300, could fly significantly higher and faster - the limiting factor (depending on the latitudes) was that flying as high as it could (49,000 feet was not unheard of) led to fuel icing problems, as the temperature of the fuel in the tanks dropped below -30 degrees (or is it -40) which is the freezing temperature of Jet A fuel. Normally, exterior temperature is colder than that, -50 or -60 or so, but friction of the air over the wing will warm it up slightly, bringing the fuel temperature back to operating levels.

I read an article written by a former PanAm SP pilot who described such flights quite nicely - I'll try to find the link.

Flying higher also allows you to fly faster, as there is less drag resistance.

The new Polar flights (like JFK-Hong Kong) apparently also have this fuel freezing issue to look out for, and requires extra attention during the flight over the cold polar regions.

Charles


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