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American Airlines APFA To Analysts: What Cost Problem?  
User currently onlineMaverickM11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 17671 posts, RR: 46
Posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 7009 times:

I would have loved to know what the analysts' response was:

http://www.thestreet.com/_yahoo/stor...cm_ven=YAHOO&cm_cat=FREE&cm_ite=NA


E pur si muove -Galileo
38 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineEricR From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1904 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 6966 times:

Ha! Not sure what the analysts response was, but I'm sure they were rolling their eyes. I love the AFA's following comment:

"What's wrong with American is not labor but [rather] its failure to keep pace with its competitors in revenue,"

So what is AA supposed to do? Completely disregard costs? Unbelievable.


User currently offlineakizidy214 From Jamaica, joined Sep 2006, 408 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 6944 times:

That is clearly SJU in the photo... not JFK tsk tsk.. "The Street"

But yes AMR's cost are a factor. Are they as big as senior management says... I don't know.. As some of the other carriers filled for bankruptcy of-course their labor cost are higher... But can a bankruptcy filing really cut that much cost?

[Edited 2010-11-11 14:42:38]


DCA
User currently offlineEricR From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1904 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 6887 times:

Quoting akizidy214 (Reply 2):
But yes AMR's cost are a factor. Are they as big as senior management says... I don't know.. As some of the other carriers filled for bankruptcy of-course their labor cost are higher... But can a bankruptcy filing really cut that much cost?

When you look at the 10Qs or 10Ks you can clearly see AA has a cost problem. Their profit margin is the lowest by far out of all major carriers and they are already the highest yielding domestic carrier so not much upside room here.

Since AA never had an opportunity to restructure in BK, labor is certainly a large factor in their high cost structure.


User currently offlineglobaldude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 237 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 6598 times:

AFA does not represent the Flight Attendants at AA...APFA does.

User currently offlinecommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11752 posts, RR: 62
Reply 5, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 6601 times:

The flight attendants' own numbers speak for themselves.

The APFA's own economist said that AA's flight attendant unit labor costs are the highest among major U.S. carriers.

He offered some explanations, like how AA "overstaffs" (i.e., employs excess flight attendants) its planes and has lots of 3-class-configured aircraft. Some of his explanations are ... questionable.

I, too, would love to hear what Wall Street had to say about this.


User currently offlinethegreatRDU From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2310 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 6570 times:

This isn't surprising....

If only Arpey had a spine, he can end this once and for all...



Our Returning Champion
User currently offlineflyfree727 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 6558 times:

]

Quoting commavia (Reply 6):
Some of his explanations are ... questionable

About the response I would expect from someone who recently stated he was hanging around the halls of AA HDQ...
just saying...

AA ORD


User currently offlineflyfree727 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 6549 times:

Quoting thegreatRDU (Reply 8):
If only Arpey had a spine, he can end this once and for all...

OMG so true!!

He can own up to the employees that their concession are what kept AA out of bankruptcy while AA execs lined their pockets..
But, given the chance, APFA will show who has the spine, yet again.
our YES vote on a strike still stands. There will be no second vote. Once 30 day cooling off is granted, its a contract or a strike.

AA ORD


User currently offlinecommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11752 posts, RR: 62
Reply 9, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 6464 times:

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 9):
About the response I would expect from someone who recently stated he was hanging around the halls of AA HDQ...

Yes - I was walking around CP5 a few weeks back. So what? You really think that is the reason why I question some of the assumptions and conclusions from an economist that the APFA hired. That is the reason.

Seriously?

There are plenty of people who don't exactly buy into the APFA's "analysis" 100%, just as they don't buy into the company's "analysis" 100%. I am one of them. And not all of them "[hang] around the halls" of headquarters (and, by the way, I don't either).

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 9):
just saying...

Just saying what?

I'm just taking the words from the economist that you paid for.

He said AMR's flight attendant labor costs were the highest in America among major airlines. He said that was due to AMR's "overstaffing" and use of 3-class configurations on 777s.

That is "questionable" to me since United flies more 3-class international aircraft than AMR does, and yet its labor costs are lower, and as for the "overstaffing" issue - as I said long ago, I'm still wondering which part, exactly, of that argument the APFA is hoping to win? The part about how they admit AMR's flight attendant costs are the highest, or the part where they say the reason why is because AMR employs so many flight attendants.

Just saying ...

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 11):
He can own up to the employees that their concession are what kept AA out of bankruptcy

The union concessions are part of what kept AA out of bankruptcy - not all of it.

I honestly think it hurts labor's cause to make comments like that, particularly to the Street, who probably wouldn't be so quick to dismiss all those alleged overpaid, incompetent and/or uncaring fat cat executives (you know, the ones who were supposedly "lining their own pockets") who also have had a role to play in keeping the company solvent.

It's amazing to me how AA's unions - and Glading, Inc. chief among them - still continue to claim 100% of the credit for the good, but place 100% of the blame for the bad on management. So comical.

Labor and management both deserve blame for what has long been wrong at AMR, but they also both deserve enormous credit for what has, despite the challenges, gone right at the company.


User currently offlineflyfree727 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 6228 times:

Quoting commavia (Reply 13):

It's amazing to me how AA's unions - and Glading, Inc. chief among them - still continue to claim 100% of the credit for the good, but place 100% of the blame for the bad on management. So comical.

Call it whatever you want, but in May 2003, AA stated to its employee that unless concessions were granted by 5pm, the "lawyers are on the courthouse steps to file BK."
The concessions were granted and NO bk was filed. Had there been some more compelling reasons to file, AA would have, but because of the employees concession,, they didn't. And I might add, AA got every concession they wanted. Not a penny less. So, yes, AA management can be to blame. If they needed more, they should have asked for it, or filed. simple 'nuff...

And let me yet again point out that any contract on the property, including the "highly inflated labor costs" currenly in place was AGREED to by AA. If they didn't like it, they shouldn't have agreed to it. Same as with the employees.. If we don't like the contracts we currently have, then we seek change. And only when we reach an agreement that WE like, will we sign off on it.

Quoting commavia (Reply 13):
Labor and management both deserve blame for what has long been wrong at AMR

How? AA has agreed to anything labor has. It's managements responsibility to make this airline PROFITable. With over ONE BILLION A YEAR in labor cost cuts, they still can't do it. I recall on a quartly conference call, I believe last year, after AA discussed their plans going forward, one of the analysist actually said to Arpey "thats all you got??"

AA ORD


User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 23148 posts, RR: 20
Reply 11, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 6208 times:

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 14):
And let me yet again point out that any contract on the property, including the "highly inflated labor costs" currenly in place was AGREED to by AA

What difference does that make?

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 14):
It's managements responsibility to make this airline PROFITable.

I think this assertion is the source of the problem. It's everyone's job to make the carrier profitable, from Arpey to the guys who clean out the lavs at DFW. When times are tough, everyone should share in the sacrifice; when times were good, everyone certainly shared in the reward.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlinecommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11752 posts, RR: 62
Reply 12, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 6152 times:

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 14):
Call it whatever you want, but in May 2003, AA stated to its employee that unless concessions were granted by 5pm, the "lawyers are on the courthouse steps to file BK."
The concessions were granted and NO bk was filed.

Precisely. As I already said, labor concessions were part of what prevented bankruptcy. It was part, not all.

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 14):
because of the employees concession,, they didn't.

Because of the employee concessions - among other things - yes.

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 14):
And let me yet again point out that any contract on the property, including the "highly inflated labor costs" currenly in place was AGREED to by AA.

Right, just as the company agreed to continue to pay your salary and not file for bankruptcy, even after competitors slashed wages lower and cut work rules, continued to fund your pension and not file for bankruptcy, even after competitors froze and or dumped their plans, and on and on.

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 14):
If they didn't like it, they shouldn't have agreed to it.

Well, you - as an AA flight attendant - should understand better than anybody that the world changes.

The concessions AMR unions agreed to in 2003 made AMR extremely competitive in 2003. It's not 2003 anymore. Between then and now, four of AA's largest competitors filed for bankruptcy (one twice), and all lower their unit labor costs below AMR's through laying off thousands more people, cutting inflexible work rules, downshifting more capacity to regionals through relaxed scope, outsourcing overhauls and other maintenance, and freezing and/or dumping their defined benefit pension plans.

Thus, given that context of the reality of 2010 - which I doubt you or any other AA flight attendant would dispute - AMR's concessions circa 2003 are no longer as large relative to competitor labor groups as they were almost a decade ago.

Thankfully for AMR, and you, post-competitor competitors' labor costs are already rising, and this is only being accelerated through consolidation, so hopefully some of the competitor pressure on AMR - and its labor contracts - will soon ease further.

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 14):
How? AA has agreed to anything labor has. It's managements responsibility to make this airline PROFITable. With over ONE BILLION A YEAR in labor cost cuts, they still can't do it. I recall on a quartly conference call, I believe last year, after AA discussed their plans going forward, one of the analysist actually said to Arpey "thats all you got??"

First, it's quaint (very 1957) to suggest that only management has responsibility for corporate profit and success. In the strictest legal and fiduciary sense, that is true. In reality, labor - any airline's #1 or #2 cost - also has both an incentive, and a responsibility, not to kill their employer with uncompetitive labor costs.

Second, despite the "over ONE BILLION A YEAR" in cost cuts AMR's unions agreed to in 2003, it is stunning that it is still necessary to repeat that the labor unions at other airlines were forced to give up far more - relatively speaking - through bankruptcy.

Did you have to give up concessions in 2003? Sure. Did it contribute dramatically to the company's survival and avoidance of bankruptcy? Absolutely. Would you have done better if AMR had followed all of its legacy competitors into bankruptcy? Of course not.

So yeah, you have sacrificed for the last seven years. We get it - we all get it. And yeah, the company hasn't been dazzlingly profitable during that time - in part, yes, due to labor costs like pensions, work rules, in-house overhauls, and restrictive scope.

But, bottom line, who are we kidding? Which legacy airline flight attendant contract would you rather have preferred for the last seven years? United's? Delta's? Northwest's? USAirways'?

Perhaps some perspective is useful when you and others continually rail against the failure of a management that hasn't necessarily delivered profit, but also hasn't wiped out shareholders and dumped your pension (among other things you would have lost in bankruptcy). Grass is always greener, and some people - like Glading, et al - apparently have absolutely no sense of reality.


User currently offlineLDVAviation From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 1095 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 5993 times:

Quoting commavia (Reply 16):
But, bottom line, who are we kidding? Which legacy airline flight attendant contract would you rather have preferred for the last seven years? United's? Delta's? Northwest's? USAirways'?

Flyfree727, answer this question for us: Which contract would you have rather had for the last seven years?

United? Delta's? Northwest's? Or, US Airways'?

I've even got one more question for you: Which contract of the four would you like to have going forward?

Now choose carefully, because if you choose one that no longer provides for a defined benefit plan you may have to forfeit your plan.

[Edited 2010-11-11 21:11:42]

User currently offlineDelimit From United States of America, joined Jan 2009, 1513 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 5882 times:

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 10):
It's managements responsibility to make this airline PROFITable

Whoa. I am sort of blown away by that statement.


User currently offlinecrosswinds21 From Netherlands, joined Jun 2009, 699 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 5827 times:

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 10):
It's managements responsibility to make this airline PROFITable.

Yes, and as a result, management looks for ways to have revenue exceed costs. If management could have its way, then the FAs would be paid lower than they currently are. This would decrease costs. That would go a long way towards making the airline profitable. There are more than plenty of people willing to work the FA job for much lower pay than the current union FAs are earning.


User currently offlinethegreatRDU From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2310 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 5463 times:

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 11):
OMG so true!!

He can own up to the employees that their concession are what kept AA out of bankruptcy while AA execs lined their pockets..
But, given the chance, APFA will show who has the spine, yet again.
our YES vote on a strike still stands. There will be no second vote. Once 30 day cooling off is granted, its a contract or a strike.

no no no I meant put a a cap in Laura Glading's foul mouth......I hope you guys take industrial action...this is not sustainable....Arpey should got war and earn his stripes...

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 10):
It's managements responsibility to make this airline PROFITable.

That's right they need to get some more labor productivity, outsource all "c" maintenance and above to 3rd parties, loosen up the pilot scope clauses, get rid of MQ etc...



Our Returning Champion
User currently offlineckfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5274 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 4996 times:

The overstaffing issue is ironic. If AA chose to reduce staffing to FAA minimums on all flights, I'm sure that APFA would be mad, sinne that would result in some furloughs.

By the same token, if AA decided to eliminate 3-class service on the 777s and the trans-cons, then APA would be having a fit. I read in the pilots' magazine years ago a diatribe about how MRTC was costing the carrier money. I'm sure they would argue that getting rid of international first would be a bad economic decision.

That said, here is something to ponder. When comparing both left seat and right seat, with the same seniority, the typical WN pilot makes $40 an hour more than the typical AA pilot, when comparing 737 pay.

Granted, the typical Southwest pilot probably flies more hours every month than the typical AA pilot. While WN offers profit sharing and a 401(k) plan, AA has 401(k) and a pension plan. Most airlines that went through BK in the past 10 years dumped their pension plans. And I would wager that AA's other benefits (vacation, health, vision, dental, etc.,) are more generous.

This isn't so much an F/A issue as a pilot issue, but when you have a more aircraft types in your fleet, you have to have more reserve pilots. Whereas WN has just the 737, AA has 737, 757/767, 777, and MD-80. If the entire AA fleet consisted of one aircraft type, then it could conceivably have several hundred fewer active pilots.

With more hours per pilot and AA's need for more reserve pilots, WN probably makes up some or all of the difference in pay rates with more favorable costs on benefits and 401(k) contributions.

Put all of those factors together for all of AA's unionized employees, and I can see why AA and the analysts claim that AA has a cost issue with compensation.

It would be interesting to know if the APFA's economists have taken all aspects fo compensation into account, or are they merely focusing on wages?


User currently onlineMaverickM11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 17671 posts, RR: 46
Reply 18, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 4970 times:

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 10):
I believe last year, after AA discussed their plans going forward, one of the analysist actually said to Arpey "thats all you got??"

I remember that vividly. Their plan was "let's just wait for all the other carriers' costs to increase to our level", plus the cornerstone strategy. Everyone was underwhelmed by a plan that was based on AA's competitors doing nothing for years and AA's costs staying flat, neither of which is liketly to happen.



E pur si muove -Galileo
User currently offlineckfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5274 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 4905 times:

One issue that AA has finally addressed is ATI. AA hasn't had ATI with large European or Asian carriers, while DL, UA, CO, and NW have. Now that AA has ATI with BA, IB, and JL, that should work to increase traffic, both coming from overseas, as well as originating in the U.S.

By the same token, AA starting to interline with B6 and West Jet will also help revenue. AA has had a Canadian issue since AC bought CP, as well as a lack of presence north of BOS, since scaling back the old BEX operation.

I sitll think one issue for AMR is Eagle. Eagle's costs are very high, compared to other regionals. The problem for AMR, or so I'm told, is that AA has to pay Eagle for each flight operated, at a rate that guarentees Eagle a profit. Yet, AA can only charge what the market will bear. So, if WN, DL, UA, etc. can afford to charge lower fares, because of their costs, AA has to match those fares, even if the fares don't pay for the cost of an Eagle flight.


User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5676 posts, RR: 10
Reply 20, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 4815 times:

Quoting commavia (Reply 5):
He offered some explanations, like how AA "overstaffs" (i.e., employs excess flight attendants) its planes and has lots of 3-class-configured aircraft. Some of his explanations are ... questionable.

So he's advocating for REDUCING FA staff? Strange.

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 8):
He can own up to the employees that their concession are what kept AA out of bankruptcy while AA execs lined their pockets..

How exactly did AA management "line their pockets"? Are you talking about the stock options that were used as part of their pay to reduce direct costs to the airline? That were offered to the union work force but turned down in?

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 8):
But, given the chance, APFA will show who has the spine, yet again.
our YES vote on a strike still stands. There will be no second vote. Once 30 day cooling off is granted, its a contract or a strike.

Well go for it, strike. I don't think it will be good for the FA's but it is your right.

Quoting flyfree727 (Reply 10):
If they needed more, they should have asked for it, or filed. simple 'nuff...

They are asking for it ("more") because the costs are now again out of sync with the rest of the industry. and if the union doesn't want to agree then it it their right to strike. And it is an option for management to file bankruptcy if that is what is called for.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineFlyMIX From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 31 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4710 times:

Quoting ckfred (Reply 19):
I sitll think one issue for AMR is Eagle. Eagle's costs are very high, compared to other regionals. The problem for AMR, or so I'm told, is that AA has to pay Eagle for each flight operated, at a rate that guarentees Eagle a profit. Yet, AA can only charge what the market will bear. So, if WN, DL, UA, etc. can afford to charge lower fares, because of their costs, AA has to match those fares, even if the fares don't pay for the cost of an Eagle flight.

You would be mistaken. Fee for Departure is the standard way to pay for regional feed, with few exceptions. Every DL, UA, US etc regional flight that departs is paid for in a way that guarantees the regional airline a profit. In fact, while the profit made by RP etc goes right out the door of the contracting airline, the fee paid to Eagle stays in AMR...goes right back to the bottom line.

Additionally, while most regional airlines' labor costs are going up, Eagle's will be coming down due to the fact that many of the senior-most pilots (over 200) will most likely leave for AA in the next few months as AA recalls crew, and they will be replaced by much more junior (and therefore cheaper) pilots. Other, structural problems such as aircraft size/scope limits would apply to any regional carrier, and not just Eagle.


User currently offlineFlyMIX From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 31 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4676 times:

Quoting EricR (Reply 3):
Since AA never had an opportunity to restructure in BK, labor is certainly a large factor in their high cost structure


It is sad that filing for BK is was/is seen as "an opportunity"....I heard someone say that there was once a time that an executive would sneak in the back door of his country club and hide out of shame on the day that his company filed for bankruptcy. Now, it seems that some would walk in the front door bragging about it and how they can now shed those pesky contracts that were now too expensive.


User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4619 times:

Quoting tugger (Reply 20):
So he's advocating for REDUCING FA staff? Strange.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong but I believe the MD-80s, 737s, and 757s, all operate with the minimum number of F/As. I think there may be 8 F/As on the 763, 9 on the 762, and 9 or 10 on the 772... I'm not sure where they could make cuts since other airlines use similar F/A staffing levels.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineEricR From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1904 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (3 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4588 times:

Quoting FlyMIX (Reply 22):
It is sad that filing for BK is was/is seen as "an opportunity"....I heard someone say that there was once a time that an executive would sneak in the back door of his country club and hide out of shame on the day that his company filed for bankruptcy. Now, it seems that some would walk in the front door bragging about it and how they can now shed those pesky contracts that were now too expensive.

Well, in all fairness, everyone can look back today and say AA made a mistake by not entering BK to restructure their costs.

However, back then, AA was praised for being the only legacy to avert BK. If AA knew back then that they were going to be a such a competitive disadvantage due to their high labor costs, they might have opted for BK.


25 SPREE34 : File, gut the retirements, toss the contracts, and then they will have cost on par with the competition. APFA won't like that either. The AA employee
26 LAXtoATL : He never advocated for cuts. That's just some people taking liberties. Anyway, I don't remember his exact presentation, but the gist is that AA's f/a
27 PlanesNTrains : Sounds like you'd completely understand if they asked for more......but you'd nonetheless refuse to sign unless YOU felt it was good enough. Interest
28 LAXtoATL : I will tell you who else won't like that... the INVESTORS! AMR and the airline industry in general is too healthy to even discuss a bankruptcy filing
29 LAXtoATL : Neither will happen anytime soon. Bankruptcy is nowhere in the cards for AA right now and if the f/a are released into a cooling off period AA would
30 dartland : This whole thing does confirm one question I always had: Are the unions politically savvy or just delusional? I always assumed politically savvy -- th
31 Post contains links commavia : The video is here. The recognition of industry-high flight attendant costs is at time 4:44 (he even says "this makes the company's argument"), and th
32 PlanesNTrains : I would agree with that, but I would also then say to the APFA that management is indeed working on creating a revenue premium. If they think AA mana
33 LAXtoATL : Well, we have to disagree on this one. The industry have a positive outlook for the first time in a long time, and AA in particular has just received
34 PlanesNTrains : No need, though, because you may very well be right. I just wonder if AA can afford to stay the course for years to come? I am not advocating for a s
35 ckfred : As explained to me by an AA pilot, if AA bid out RJ flying, the bids would be for some kind of formula, that takes into account distance flown, landi
36 LAXtoATL : Which really doesn't matter since AMR owns both AA and Eagle. Eagle could charge AA $1 per flight and it would change the financial results since nei
37 Post contains images commavia : Precisely. AMR Corporation has two primary subsidiaries - American Airlines, Inc. (AA) and AMR Eagle, Inc. AMR Eagle, Inc., in turn, has two primary
38 GlobalCabotage : Dont't the FA's like the $100 check they recieved yesterday (before taxes)?
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